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Watched Last Night

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  • The Other Side of the Door (2016)

    Anglo Indian horror flick, essentially a re-run of Pet Semetary with none of the style. Director Johannes Roberts uses loud noises to make up for any genuine build up and Sarah Wayne Callies is the suitably distraught parent. It's all very 'oh hum' but Tigon Man take note, it's a considerably better than The Uncanny!

    Comment


    • Dangerous Davies -The Last Detective- (1980)

      The great Bernard Cribbins plays Leslie Thomas hapless sleuth, with a script co written by the author himself.
      Poor old Dangerous gets a kicking from every passing villain he meets and in the amusing opening scene puts a metal bucket on his head when facing down a deranged tenant (Roy Stewart).
      Charged by Chief Joss Ackland to track down local heavy Cecil Ramscar, Dangerous reopens the case a of young girl, who went missing fifteen years earlier.
      With Bill Maynard, Cindy O'Callaghan, Frank Windsor.
      Good solid entertainment from Jack Gill at ITC.

      Comment


      • A Tale of Five Cities (1951). Amnesiac soldier Bonar Colleano searches for five women in five cities, Gina Lollobrigida in Rome, Eva Bartok in Vienna, Karin Himboldt in Berlin, Anne Vernon in Paris and, kind of, Lana Morris in London, to find out who he is, with Barbara Kelly lusting for him in the meantime. Really quite tediously drawn out, the film could've done with a whole lot more humour, and it's rather mortifying to see the post-war devastation in Vienna and Berlin as Bonar gets to do location work around Europe.

        Comment


        • Lost (1956). Enjoyable baby kidnapping/police procedural thriller from Janet Green extensively photographed on location in crisp Eastmancolor by Harry Waxman. David Knight and Julia Arnall are the distraught American parents whose 18 month son disappears outside Joan Hickson's chemist shop in London and David Farrar, Anthony Oliver, Eleanor Summerfield and Meredith Edwards lead the Scotland Yard babyhunt. There's some humour too plus cameos from the likes of Thora Hird, Everley Gregg, Joan Sims and Marianne Stone (Peter Noble was the associate producer!) and director Guy Green keeps it quite pacy. Julia's anguish which ratchets up to hysteria, though understandable, does get a bit wearing and even her husband tells her to shut up at one point, but it's slickly made and a morale booster for the Met.

          Comment


          • The Late Edwina Black (1951). David Farrar again, but this time perhaps not on the side of the angels in this gothic Victorian melodrama with echoes of Rebecca and The Tomb of Ligeia as the baleful influence of the title character affects those who remain in the house: David as her widower, Geraldine Fitzgerald as her companion and Jean Cadell as her loyal, Mrs. Danvers-like housekeeper. Roland Culver plays the cor-blimey police inspector who suspects foul play and director Maurice Elvey racks up the tension, the crumbling relationships between the characters, the shadows in the house and the tinkling of the glass windmill. Highly enjoyable entertainment well played by the small cast.

            Comment


            • The Vulture (1967)

              A family curse strikes a Cornish (American family) and they are subsequently terrorised by a half human, half bird like creature.
              Robert Hutton walks stiffly into another grade z horror, ably assisted in woodenness by Diane Clare as his Missus, with Robert as a nucleur Physicist or something, trying to destroy the creature before it snuffs out the rest of the family.
              Howlingly inept in every department, If the Uncanny had paws, The Vulture has claws! Huge plastic talons, which descent and ascend in a sort of avian VTOL, usually carrying some hapless bit parter away of off the set.
              Lawrence Huntington's last film and not one for which he would wish to be remembered.

              Comment


              • Simon and Laura (1955). Quite amusing satire of early television with "perfect couple" Simon and Laura having their idyllic home life translated into a daily soap opera. But the perfect couple and the idyllic home life is anything but, especially when they have a dithering producer and corny scriptwriter about who have romantic issues of their own. S is Peter Finch and L is Kay Kendall and they do sterling stuff as do Ian Carmichael and Muriel Pavlow as the production team, with Richard Wattis as "CT" their boss and Maurice Denham and Thora Hird as the domestics. Based on a play and thereafter a TV adaptation by Alan Melville that starred Roland Culver and Coral Browne, a newspaper article briefly shown at one point seems to be about those rather than the TV series in the film! The TV studios appear more like a film studio and of course having this in VistaVision and Technicolor, the naughty Rank Organisation could show the thing in a way the BBC never could then.

                Comment


                • I sat through Churchill (2017) last night but I had to have my ears covered. The actor playing Churchill (Brian Cox) shouted continuously and the Dolby soundtrack amplified his over-breathy rumbling voice to twice human level volume . And there was an orchestra playing CONTINUOUSLY fighting to be heard over his doubly-loud voice. It was one of those Disney movie kind of soundtracks which told you what to think because this was very much a Disney style movie where all the characters (including Miranda Richardson as Clementine Churchill) were reduced down to one-dimensional cartoonish characters. The omni-present orchestra with celestial choir were bellowing away in one scene to accompany Churchill dressing himself. The script was written to be all perfectly PC with an ersatz Morgan Freeman character in the shape of Field Marshal Jan Christiaan Smuts. Avoid at all costs or wear ear plugs.

                  Comment


                  • The Balloon Goes Up (1942). Another feeble wartime comedy from E. J. Fancey written by Val Valentine, who should have known better. Essentially a vehicle for that cut-price Gert and Daisy, Ethel Revnell and Gracie West, it's Ronald Shiner (who has next to nothing to do) and Donald Peers (singing most of the songs) who get top billing and in fact Gracie gets no credit at all. Their co-stars are a battalion of barrage balloons, who probably give the best performance. There's a tiny of notion of a plot about "stolen papers" from a RAF base, but it's really just a series of variety sketches and songs barely adequately performed. The balloons ejecting air would have been more amusing.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                      The Late Edwina Black (1951). David Farrar again, but this time perhaps not on the side of the angels in this gothic Victorian melodrama with echoes of Rebecca and The Tomb of Ligeia as the baleful influence of the title character affects those who remain in the house: David as her widower, Geraldine Fitzgerald as her companion and Jean Cadell as her loyal, Mrs. Danvers-like housekeeper. Roland Culver plays the cor-blimey police inspector who suspects foul play and director Maurice Elvey racks up the tension, the crumbling relationships between the characters, the shadows in the house and the tinkling of the glass windmill. Highly enjoyable entertainment well played by the small cast.
                      Out of idle curiosity, Gerald, do you have all these movies on disc or are you downloading them?

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                        The Late Edwina Black (1951). David Farrar again, but this time perhaps not on the side of the angels in this gothic Victorian melodrama with echoes of Rebecca and The Tomb of Ligeia as the baleful influence of the title character affects those who remain in the house: David as her widower, Geraldine Fitzgerald as her companion and Jean Cadell as her loyal, Mrs. Danvers-like housekeeper. Roland Culver plays the cor-blimey police inspector who suspects foul play and director Maurice Elvey racks up the tension, the crumbling relationships between the characters, the shadows in the house and the tinkling of the glass windmill. Highly enjoyable entertainment well played by the small cast.
                        Out of idle curiosity, Gerald, do ŷou have all these movies on discs or are you downloading them?

                        Comment


                        • Watched The Shout last night,shown in April on TPTV.Pretentious twaddle.It shows how artistic prevention can ride roughshod over common sense.

                          Comment


                          • "Blood Orange" 1953

                            A private investigator gets involved with a jewel robbery in the fashion industry.

                            Tom Conway plays.........Tom Conway ex FBI now a P.I .

                            Eric Pohlman. Naomi Chance. Mila Parely & Andrew Osborne in this routine but fast paced thriller.

                            One of the early Hammer productions directed by Terence Fisher.

                            Familiar faces Richard Wattis, Michael Ripper, Eileen Way, Delphi Lawrence & Roger Delgado are along for the ride.

                            Not bad but Tom Conway must have been sick of playing the same world weary P.I by this time!
                            Last edited by wadsy; 3rd June 2017, 02:01 AM.

                            Comment


                            • Silver Dream Racer another truly awful Rank film,recently shown by TPTV

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by John Hamilton View Post

                                Out of idle curiosity, Gerald, do you have all these movies on disc or are you downloading them?
                                I have these on disc, John.

                                Comment

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