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  • The Spider and the Fly (1949). Philippe de Lodocq is a gentleman bank robber, as suave and cultured as you can imagine, and he is in a constant game of cat and mouse with chief of police Fernand Maubert. Philippe's alibis are always ingenious and he foils Maubert at almost every turn. His schemes are nearly thwarted, however, when the beautiful adventuress Madeleine Saincaize wins his heart, but after the First World War descends upon France, Maubert decides robbers can have other uses, unfortunately with unexpected outcomes.
    It's deliberately not clear who are the title characters in this slightly overlong and occasionally plodding thriller, but stick with it and it's intriguing enough and has a sting in its tail. Atmospherically lit by Geoffrey Unsworth and directed by Robert Hamer, Eric Portman stars as Maubert with Guy Rolfe as Philippe and Nadia Gray as Madeleine, plus there's Edward Chapman, Maurice Denham, George Cole, John Carol in two roles as brothers, and even Arthur Lowe as a pompous town clerk.

    Comment


    • Another Time Another Place (1958)

      During the last days of World War II, an American reporter has a romance with a BBC radio reporter.
      Artificial romantic drama with Lana Turner and Sean Connery both woefully miscast as the star crossed lovers.
      Big Sean is supposed to be Cornish, when he mentions in his Edinburgh burr being born in 'Shaint Giles' it was hard not to laugh..
      Lana isn't much of an actress and the sight of her clattering round Cornish village streets in heels and a fur stole is equally amusing.
      Terence Longdon fares better in a larger role than usual, as Sean's radio producer and Glynis John's is good as Sean's Missus.
      With Barry Sullivan, Sid James and Martin Stephens.

      Comment


      • The Last Chance (1968)

        A journalist (undercover spy) gets caught up in international intrigue.

        Tab Hunter, Daniela Bianchi, Michael Rennie & lots of Italian character actors appear in this complete mishmash.
        Hunter & Bianchi make a good looking couple but that's about all this film has going for it.
        I have no idea what it was about or what the numerous subplots meant.
        Hunter was pretty bad & the film was awful!

        Comment


        • I watched Pulp Fiction for the 100000th time.
          I guess I don't even need to make a synopsis about it.

          Comment


          • Without a Clue (1988)

            In which Dr Watson has invented Sherlock Holmes and needs someone to portray him in the flesh as a figurehead, whilst the good Doctor actually solves the crimes.
            Ben Kingsley is Doctor Watson and Michael Caine is Sherlock Holmes or Reginald Kincaid, ham actor and drunk.
            A would be comedy, that is about as funny, as having a hansom cab run over your foot.
            With Lysette Anthony, Jeffrey Jones, Paul Freeman (as Moriarty) and Nigel Davenport.

            Comment


            • Zardoz (1973). What this trippy and pretentious fantasy film by John Boorman is about, maybe it's the inevitability of death, but otherwise as a character says near the beginning, "It's pointless". Although it's got adult references, nudity and fetish sex, it's quite difficult to know what kind of audience this was expected to entertain rather than puzzle. Geoffrey Unsworth's photography is of course splendid as it struggles through the arty direction. Sean Connery is all pony tail, hairy chest and nappy and Charlotte Rampling looks wonderful but is clearly puzzled about what the hell is going on while John Alderton walks through it totally bemused. Not one I will watch for the 100000th time.
              The voice of the Tabernacle is down as belonging to David De Keyser, but it sounds to me rather like the slightly lighter tones of Richard Bebb.

              Comment


              • I just watched the final episode of 'Survivors (1975) on DVD but am still just as puzzled by the final scene as I was when I first watched it on the box over 40 years ago.
                Everybody has just bust a gut getting a power station up and running, yet when the Laird (Ian Cuthbertson) sits down for an evening meal, his ladyfriend comes in to join him and switches off the electric lights and plonks a candelabra on the table. They then raise a glass to each other by the candlelight and smile as if to suggest "We don't need no steenkin electricity".

                Comment


                • King Creole (1958). For my money the best film that Elvis made. Taken from the book A Stone For Danny Fisher it tells the story of the rise to fame of night club singer Danny (Elvis) in the face of blackmail by Walter Matthau aided by his hanger on Vic Morrow. Dean Jagger and Carolyn Jones are along for the ride. Some great music including Trouble, Dixieland Rock, Hard Headed Woman and of course King Creole. Directed by Michael Curtiz.

                  Comment


                  • The Alphabet Murders (1965). Belgian detective Hercule Poirot is determined to investigate a series of murders where the victims' initials follow the alphabet despite the determination of the British Secret Service in the guise of the redoubtable Captain Hastings, aided by local police inspector Japp, to have him deported.
                    This David Pursall and Jack Seddon comedy/mystery stablemate of their MGM Miss Marple films is nowhere near as enjoyable despite imaginative and cartoonish direction by Frank Tashlin. For starters, the screenplay is quite untidy and muddled: if Agatha Christie disliked the Marple films, she probably hated this. However, the main problem is the casting of Tony Randall as a slimline and energetic Poirot whose characterisation is just annoying and his wandering accent is worse than Inspector Clouseau's - he can't even pronounce his own surname most of the time. A large, bumbling Hastings is played by Robert Morley and Maurice Denham plays Japp as a standard dim-witted copper. Anita Ekberg floats in and out of the film along with Guy Rolfe, James Villiers and Julian Glover and sadly Richard Wattis only gets one scene. Also appearing even more briefly are Margaret Rutherford and Stringer Davis in their Marple and Stringer personae and a previous Poirot, Austin Trevor, pops up too as a butler.
                    The best thing is the make-up on Randall by an uncredited Stuart Freeborn comprising an excellent false note and a totally convincing balding pate.

                    Comment


                    • I watched my "Moulin Rouge" (1953) DVD again but was disappointed because the sound track is not too clear and I was constantly having to rewind to try to hear T-L's witticisms, eg-
                      Zsa-Zsa- "Don't you wish you were tall Henri?"
                      T-L- (swigging cognac)- "After two more of these I will be".


                      And to make matters worse all the actors spoke a shade too fast for my taste, compounding the problem, and there were no subtitles available, drat!
                      Also the M.Rouge itself looked too much like a dry film set because the air wasn't smoky enough, and the lighting was bland and had no atmosphere.
                      Not one of John Huston's best, but in fairness to him maybe the poor sound quality is because I've got a wonky DVD or something.
                      Last edited by Eyeball; 22nd May 2020, 02:25 AM.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Eyeball View Post
                        I just watched the final episode of 'Survivors (1975) on DVD but am still just as puzzled by the final scene as I was when I first watched it on the box over 40 years ago.
                        Everybody has just bust a gut getting a power station up and running, yet when the Laird (Ian Cuthbertson) sits down for an evening meal, his ladyfriend comes in to join him and switches off the electric lights and plonks a candelabra on the table. They then raise a glass to each other by the candlelight and smile as if to suggest "We don't need no steenkin electricity".
                        The way you describe the scene, the meaning is as clear as daylight. Am I missing something?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by narabdela View Post

                          The way you describe the scene, the meaning is as clear as daylight. Am I missing something?
                          Well my interpretation of the scene is that people were beginning to realise that their new post-apoc world was more peaceful without any mod cons..

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Eyeball View Post

                            Well my interpretation of the scene is that people were beginning to realise that their new post-apoc world was more peaceful without any mod cons..
                            ...er, no, that's not what I had in mind.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by narabdela View Post

                              ...er, no, that's not what I had in mind.
                              Ok let's try another interpretation- the woman switched off the electric lights because she and the Laird preferred romantic candlelight to set the mood for some serious shagging later..

                              Comment


                              • The Great Raid (2005)
                                Benjamin Bratt plays Lt. Colonel Mucci, who puts his faith in young Captain Prince (James Franco) to plan and lead a dangerous mission to rescue Allied POWs held by the Japanese on Luzon. With Joseph Fiennes,,Connie Nielsen and Craig Mclachlan (fresh from some Aussie Soap ).
                                Filmed in Australia.
                                Based on the true story of a raid by U.S. Army Rangers and Local guerillas, who attacked the Japanese POW camp at Cabanatuan and rescued more than 500 prisoners, At least 500 Japanese were killed in the surprise attack (the true figure varies).
                                The Film seems to stick to the facts fairly closely,it is not full of CGI and has no shaky camera effects etc and the story has not been over dramatised like many war films.
                                As a wee bonus you also get a couple of low passes by a Genuine Lockheed Hudson Bomber

                                Comment


                                • Bonekicker
                                  Bonekicker commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  When you mentioned a Hudson, I had to find out how one survived in flying condition, and there is an article about Aussie Hudsons here https://www.australianflying.com.au/...dson-survivors

                                  I knew they werent common (which is surprising for such a widely used and useful type), but the Aussie one is seemingly the only flying example in the world. And I had totally forgotten that Japan produced a variant of the Super Electra under licence, which apparently did cause confusion on one occasion.

                                  And I found this thread which sounds like an interesting job for anyone who likes both planes and films - https://www.key.aero/forum/historic-...electra-sought

                                • BVS
                                  BVS commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Yes - Hudsons are ultra rare BK - unfortunately the key.aero forum is a shadow of its former self,I have been a member on there for 15 years - it is so sad that the last 'Update' just killed it,key publishing decided not to use an off the shelf forum solution and handed the job of designing the new 'improved' forum to a local company - the resulting mess has very little functionality.

                                • Bonekicker
                                  Bonekicker commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Yes, the old Flypast forum was far better - much easier to use
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