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  • The Old Dark House (1963).

    An American car salesman in England takes up his flatmates offer & spends a night at the family mansion, where murders abound!
    Tom Poston, Robert Morley, Janette Scott, Mervyn Johns, Fenella Fielding, Joyce Grenfell & Peter Bull.
    A William Castle/Hammer collaboration. This is gimmick free & has some funny moments.
    Tom Poston plays his usually befuddled hero well & the supporting cast seem to be having a great time.
    Nice to see Peter Bull in a substantial role(s), he plays twins & Fenella is delicious!

    Last edited by wadsy; 1 July 2020, 10:07 AM.

    Comment


    • Allen Leighton
      Allen Leighton commented
      Editing a comment
      As it happens, I watched this recently. I can't say I like it much - the humour is mild indeed, and it serves mainly to remind you how much better a film the 1932 one was. It's fairly harmless but that's about as enthusiastic as I can get.

  • Airline (1982) - Roy Marsden

    We have not watched this series for years,so thought it was time to dust off the DVD's and have a nostalgic watch

    With Polly Hemingway,Richard Heffer and Sean Scanlan.

    RAF Pilot Flight Sergeant Jack Ruskin is demobbed from the RAF in 1946 with a bit of a chip on his shoulder (more like a hundredweight bag of spuds on each shoulder - AKA a 'balanced personality'),and starts his own airline with an ex RAF DC3/C47 Dakota.
    Locations ID'd so far are - Rufforth Airfield (yorks),Keithley Railway Station,various Malta locations inc RAF Luqa/Safi and ex RAF Hal Far as Jack struggles with black marketeers,dodgy contracts and British bureaucracy.
    Excellent series - it is a shame that the writer (Wilfred Greatorex ) got into dispute with yorkshire TV and the series was chopped at 9 episodes,it was originally planned to carry on up to the 1970's.

    Comment


    • Bonekicker
      Bonekicker commented
      Editing a comment
      I also understand that, as a period series which included the services of a DC3, it wasnt the cheapest programme to film.

      I have fond memories of it - In the first episode seem to remember Anthony Valentine and his crew crashing a C47 into a German farmhouse, before the whole thing goes up. My dad thought that wasnt very convincing (and the effects werent exactly fantastic), but I then showed him a photo of a C47 that had managed to crash on takeoff onto an actual house.

      Might have to go on the list - which is, sadly, is pretty long already!

    • BVS
      BVS commented
      Editing a comment
      It is worth watching just for the aviation locations etc and of course is itself now a snapshot in time,I thought Roy Marsden did a pretty good job in the role of Jack Ruskin TBH

  • The Violent Enemy (1968)

    Veteran Republican Coln O'More (Ed Begley), recruits London hardmen Austin and Fletcher (Jon Laurimore and Michael Standing) to break out republican hero Sean Rogan (Tom Bell), from a British jail.
    O' More wants Rogan to blow up an electronics factory for the cause, but the London firm have a different plan.
    Politics aside, this is an efficient thriller, with solid direction from Aussie Don Sharp.
    Tom Bell is excellent as Rogan, who wants a quiet life, but is forced back into troubles. Ed Begley does his usual over acting and Susan Hampshire sports a wobbly Oirish accent as the love interest.
    With Noel Purcell, Catherine Finn and Philip O'Flynn.

    Comment


    • The Legend of Tarzan® [sic] (2016). I'm not the greatest fan of jungle films but perversely still like some of the earliest Tarzan epics. This update from director David Yates has not had a great press, but I quite enjoyed it. Inevitably, 19th century characters are given 21st century attitudes and the animals are now CGI, but Christophe Lambert lookalike Alexander Skarsgård is a decent Lord of the Jungle (CGI torso and tree-swinging notwithstanding) and Christoph Waltz is nasty villain after the diamonds of Opar and indulging in slave trading for the King of the Belgians. Samuel L. Jackson is there for the American perspective and Margot Robbie is a determined though sassy Jane plus Jim Broadbent pops up briefly as a chubby W. E. Gladstone. And we do get a new Tarzan yell late on ("sounds different than I thought" mutters Waltz) and it has a little bit of Johnny Weissmuller's yodel in it.

      Comment


      • tv horror
        tv horror commented
        Editing a comment
        I also thought it was a decent attempt and in my opinion one of the better Tarzan films.

    • The Darkest Hour (2011) was screened on telly a couple of nights ago, it's a Russian/American sci-fi film filmed entirely in real-life Moscow during an alien invasion, it wasn't bad but I watched til the end mostly out of curiosity to see if they'd escape.
      SPOILER ALERT- the ending was a crock because they boarded a rescue submarine in the Moscow River and the final scene showed them sailing into the open Atlantic.
      HUH? since when is the Moscow River connected to the Atlantic? Certainly not on any map I've seen..

      Comment


      • The Camp on Blood Island (1958)

        Male & female captives in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Malaya struggle under the oppressive regime of a sadistic commandant.
        Andre Morell, Barbara Shelley, Carl Mohner, Walter Fitzgerald, Phil Brown, Michael Gwynn, Edward Underdown & Michael Goodliffe are
        amongst the prisoners. Marne Maitland, Wolfe Rilla, Ronald Radd & Michael Ripper are unlikely Japanese soldiers.
        I really enjoyed this (harrowing at times) Hammer entry. Marne Maitland really enjoys himself as a cruel Japanese officer & Ronald Radd as
        his superior officer has what must've been the easiest role of his career by spending most of his time muttering some Japanese & eating noodles!

        Comment


        • Originally posted by wadsy View Post
          The Camp on Blood Island (1958)

          Male & female captives in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Malaya struggle under the oppressive regime of a sadistic commandant.
          Andre Morell, Barbara Shelley, Carl Mohner, Walter Fitzgerald, Phil Brown, Michael Gwynn, Edward Underdown & Michael Goodliffe are
          amongst the prisoners. Marne Maitland, Wolfe Rilla, Ronald Radd & Michael Ripper are unlikely Japanese soldiers.
          I really enjoyed this (harrowing at times) Hammer entry. Marne Maitland really enjoys himself as a cruel Japanese officer & Ronald Radd as
          his superior officer has what must've been the easiest role of his career by spending most of his time muttering some Japanese & eating noodles!
          It always amazes me that Ronald Radd was only 47 when he died (in 1976).

          Comment


          • Where Has Poor Mickey Gone? (1964)

            Poor Mickey, is John Malcolm the leader of a gang of yobbos, him team consisting of dim Ray Armstrong, dimmer John Challis and posh hanger on Christopher Robbie.
            After being chucked out of a nightclub for unspecified reasons, the crew then break into the premises of fairground prop maker and magician Warren Mitchell, but get more than they bargained for.
            A real curio this one. Made by Carlton Hill Films (me neither), it's lasts barely an hour, in which not much really happens at all.
            John Malcolm sports a pork pie hat and a fast talking Ben Elton manner and like most gang leaders, is basically a chicken, letting his henchmen do the work.
            Warren Mitchell, uses his cod Italian accent from the Saint.
            The torchy singer, who sings the title song in person over the opening and end credits, is probably the best performer in the film.

            Comment


            • starofshonteff
              starofshonteff commented
              Editing a comment
              Mickey was designed primarily for a quick sale to US television as part of a syndication package, hence its one hour length (according to the book The Shrieking Sixties, it was still screening on local stations in the States in 1970). It was also released to independent UK cinemas by Compton Cameo as a support to I Married A Werewolf (US: Werewolf In A Girl's Dormitory), with a great colourful quad poster carrying the tag "For people with nerves of iron only".
              Director/producer Gerry Levy (The Body Stealers) went on to form Leap Film Productions the following year, a minor rival to Compton Cameo distributing dubbed Euro imports and American re-releases. Walton Films also picked Mickey up for release on 8mm where it was promoted in their catalogues as "featuring Warren Mitchell (star of 'Til Death Us Do Part')". For many years apparently, it was only available as the shortened 37 minute Walton version.
              Last edited by starofshonteff; 5 July 2020, 07:15 PM.

          • Cross Channel (1954). Very minor "B" from Republic Pictures with likeable Wayne Morris the imported star who is trapped in a double and triple cross smuggling affair. He has time for romance in France with Yvonne Furneaux before returning to Britain to deal with villains Patrick Allen, Carl Jaffé and Michael Golden. Arnold Marlé plays Yvonne's papa and Peter Sinclair is in the Michael Balfour role as Wayne's semi-comic sidekick. Only 61 minutes long, there's nevertheless a fair bit of action in what is perhaps a slightly unlikely project for western specialist director R. G. Springsteen.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by wadsy View Post
              The Camp on Blood Island (1958)

              Male & female captives in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Malaya struggle under the oppressive regime of a sadistic commandant.
              Andre Morell, Barbara Shelley, Carl Mohner, Walter Fitzgerald, Phil Brown, Michael Gwynn, Edward Underdown & Michael Goodliffe are
              amongst the prisoners. Marne Maitland, Wolfe Rilla, Ronald Radd & Michael Ripper are unlikely Japanese soldiers.
              I really enjoyed this (harrowing at times) Hammer entry. Marne Maitland really enjoys himself as a cruel Japanese officer & Ronald Radd as
              his superior officer has what must've been the easiest role of his career by spending most of his time muttering some Japanese & eating noodles!
              With you mentioning the "Japanese" soldiers being played by these actors I was also reminded of The Terror of the Tongs and thought with all of the PC shaming in the film and tv industries, that films like these might become banned in the near future through no fault of their own.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by tv horror View Post

                With you mentioning the "Japanese" soldiers being played by these actors I was also reminded of The Terror of the Tongs and thought with all of the PC shaming in the film and tv industries, that films like these might become banned in the near future through no fault of their own.
                Let's hope not!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by tv horror View Post

                  With you mentioning the "Japanese" soldiers being played by these actors I was also reminded of The Terror of the Tongs and thought with all of the PC shaming in the film and tv industries, that films like these might become banned in the near future through no fault of their own.
                  They would have to ban a few early James Bond films then. Dr.No was on ITV over the weekend, complete with whites playing orientals and Bond's somewhat dismissive treatment of black characters ("get my shoes").

                  Comment


                  • I agree it has became a madness of sorts, I can understand the hurt it causes yet I also think that it whitewashes history into pretending it never happened. I believe that the highlighting of such unintentional racists traits should stop as I think that it causes more controversy, the answer should be let's move on and make sure it does not happen again. I'm sorry if this sounds political as I can assure you it is not, only an observation.

                    Comment


                    • Now and Forever (1956)

                      Vernon Gray, Janette Scott, Kay Walsh, Pamela Brown & Jack Warner.

                      A young mechanic (Gray) elopes with 17 year old rich girl Janette Scott (who wouldn't?) & a chase involving police & parents ensues.
                      A beautiful film to look at in lush colour & some gorgeous scenery. The story & leads are a bit lightweight but I did enjoy the film not least
                      because of the marvelous supporting cast. Too many to mention but among them were Ronald Squire, Wilfred Lawson, Henry Victor, Marjorie Rhodes
                      & in a really funny part Hattie Jacques.
                      A typically breezy pleasant 50's romantic comedy.
                      It was Miss Scott's first adult film part & her mother Thora Hird had a tiny part as a maid.
                      I wonder why Vernon Gray's career didn't develop? He was a nice looking, cheery sort of actor & after 1960 he faded from the scene .
                      Last edited by wadsy; 7 July 2020, 07:30 PM.

                      Comment


                      • What I watched today:
                        The Slipper and the Rose (1976) because I'm a soppy old romantic and it is a very soppy but very romantic story, very well told

                        Steve

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