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  • Straight on Till Morning (1972)

    A plain girl goes to London & moves in with a strange, handsome young man who turns out to be a serial killer.
    Rita Tushingham, Shane Briant, Katya Wyeth, James Bolam, Tom Bell, Clare Kelly & Annie Ross.
    A truly weird film from Hammer directed by Peter Collinson. It starts off like a kitchen sink drama then
    turns into a slasher flick.
    Rita Tushingham is very good as the plain, mousy girl looking for love & Katya Wyeth looks stunning as her dolly bird friend.
    Tom Bell & James Bolam have little to do & only appear in the first half of the film. The second part is dominated by
    Shane Briant as the good looking but disturbed Peter. I always considered Shane Briant an odd sort of actor.
    A sort of English Helmut Berger. Handsome but a bit on the strange side. In this film he is perfectly cast!

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
      The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965)
      Long, flatulent and very boring attempt to recreate Tom Jones from the Defoe novel.
      Flatulent? does she fart a lot?

      Steve

      Comment


      • narabdela
        narabdela commented
        Editing a comment
        Maybe it just stank?

      • Tigon Man
        Tigon Man commented
        Editing a comment
        I meant the production was rather windy and overblown, not that poor Ms Novak had bottom burps.

    • Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)

      Excellent quality for youtube, it's about the real-life kidnapping of a German general by British special forces in Crete.
      The character development gives them a three-dimensional quality that raises it above most other war films.
      Below- "Sweet music to my ears" says the General (Marius Goring) as they hear the sound of German search planes-



      https://youtu.be/9ahvCt9r4R4
      --------------------------------------


      A few titbits from WIKI-
      • Goring replaced Curt Jürgens, who was the original choice to play the part of General Kreipe.
      • Christopher Lee and David McCallum have small parts: Lee as a German officer in the dentist scene, and McCallum, in his film debut, as a sailor on the ship that picks up the group. Lee's part was edited out of the 1959 American re-release of the film..
      • A "John Houseman" in the cast does not appear to be the well-known actor and director John Houseman.

      PS- I honestly can't see what good kidnapping the General did, as the Germans simply replaced him with another General.
      Same with the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich in Czechoslovakia, the Germans simply replaced him too, and slaughtered innocent Czech civilians as a reprisal.
      Last edited by Eyeball; 20 July 2020, 12:30 PM.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Eyeball View Post
        Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)A "John Houseman" in the cast does not appear to be the well-known actor and director
        That's why the IMDb lists him as John Houseman (II) in Ill Met by Moonlight, the "well-known actor & director" is listed as John Houseman (I).
        The IMDb lists people with the same name with different Roman numerals in parentheses after their name. The Roman numerals are no indication of the relative importance of the people, they just reflect the order in which they were submitted. The IMDb covers all time (when films & TV shows were made) and all countries so there are often "clashes" with multiple people with the same name.
        Some people appear under their own name rather than a "stage name".

        The Trivia for John Houseman (II) says:
        Former SOE member, he and his wife played themselves in that movie.

        Steve


        Comment


        • Originally posted by Eyeball View Post
          Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)

          PS- I honestly can't see what good kidnapping the General did, as the Germans simply replaced him with another General.
          Same with the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich in Czechoslovakia, the Germans simply replaced him too, and slaughtered innocent Czech civilians as a reprisal.
          With both of them, it just showed that the allies could do it.

          Steve

          Comment


          • orpheum
            orpheum commented
            Editing a comment
            The Allies never attempted another assassination due to the consequences of the Heydrich assassination.

        • Catholics TV (1973)

          In the near future, where traditional Catholicism has been been superseded by a more progressive approach, including the exclusion of the Latin mass, a small island off of the cost of Ireland becomes a meeting place for those who want to maintain a more traditional worship.
          Outraged, the Vatican exerts pressure by sending an envoy to the Island .
          Powerful drama, from the novel by Brian Moore.
          Trevor Howard is excellent as the Abbot, trying to contain an increasingly agitated group of monks, as is Martin Sheen as the envoy.
          Jack Gold, keeps a tight reign on proceedings as Director.
          A rare treat.

          Comment


          • agutterfan
            agutterfan commented
            Editing a comment
            I take it that was YouTube rather than the DVD?

        • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
          The Trivia for John Houseman (II) says:
          Former SOE member, he and his wife played themselves in that movie.

          Yeah JH (II) in the film must be another JH; I watched the whole film through and never spotted the famous JH director/actor in it.

          Comment


          • Stargate Universe (2009-2011 TV series, 40 episodes)



            It's a joint US/Canadian show, but as Scotland's Robert Carlyle is one of the two central stars I think we might include it here.
            It was never screened on Brit terrestrial TV (as far as I know) and I only recently discovered it by accident when an acquaintance suggested I check out a few clips on youtube and was pleasantly surprised by its subtle depths, so I bought the boxed DVD set.
            What sets it apart from run-of-mill scifi is that the two main characters (the shady computer scientist Dr Rush (Carlyle) and his hardass co-star Colonel Young (Louis Ferreira)) hate each others guts.
            SPOILER ALERT- they've had at least two fist fights and in one episode Carlyle tries to frame Ferreira for murder, and in another Ferreira deliberately maroons Carlyle on a hostile planet.
            Ah, they don't make leading characters like that any more..
            Below: here's a clip from the marooning episode, Ferreira confronts Carlyle about why he tried to frame him and rejects Carlyle's lame excuse, so he beats him unconscious and abandons him on the planet, and exits safely back to the ship through the stargate.
            "Where's Carlyle?" ask the puzzled crew.
            "He didn't make it" replies Ferreira, later claiming a rock fall got him.

            https://youtu.be/fsSnHzRxmOo
            Last edited by Eyeball; 22 July 2020, 02:59 PM.

            Comment


            • Frieda (1947) on TPTV this afternoon.
              A great film about an RAF pilot (David Farrar) who is saved by Frieda (Mai Zetterling). To thank her he marries her & brings her back to England, while England is still at war. The small-minded voices start against her.

              Frieda seems to be doing well and getting accepted. Then Frieda’s unrepentant Nazi brother turns up...

              Steve

              Comment


              • I also recently got the Blu-Ray of the combined The Wild Heart / Gone to Earth delivered the other day & I’ve just played it.

                I started with The Wild Heart as that’s the main title on the box. It starts with a bit of an overture (and some exit music at the end) and then the opening narration. Followed by Hazel running home with Foxy. There’s a plethora of inserts showing things like her Mam’s book of spells and then a fast cut to Much Wenlock where we don’t see her buying her new dress but instantly go to see cousin Albert trying to sell margarine to Mr. James. Then she’s picked up on the way home by Jack Reddin and after an initial struggle for her virtue she runs out & spends the night with Vessons. Quite a lot more fast cutting and labelling of everything (like the sundial) and then we’re off to the Chapel Social with Hazel almost falling into the mineshaft.

                They changed Hazel’s Mam’s spell at the Devil’s chair. It’s no longer about her hearing the faerie music (really her dad’s harp on the wind) but is now just if the shawl gets blown about in the wind.

                Then we eventually get to that final chase where they apparently wanted more close-ups of Jennifer Jones but it seems that they couldn’t find a tame fox in Hollywoodland so she’s carrying what is obviously a stuffed toy fox.

                With all all of the cuts and then all of the inserts & notices stuck on things everywhere to explain things to those who don’t understand subtle & discrete messages there’s really not a massive difference in the running times between the two films. But I reckon that Selznick certainly didn’t think much of his audience.

                Steve

                Comment


                • Odeonman
                  Odeonman commented
                  Editing a comment
                  When this was shown on TV by the BBC (it seems the first screening was Dec. 30th 1961), it was The Wild Heart version throughout the sixties (in black and white of course). It seems that Gone to Earth wasn't shown until 1990 (on BBC-2).

                • Steve Crook
                  Steve Crook commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Confusingly & misleadingly The Wild Heart has often been shown & released on video or other media, as Gone to Earth. And vice Verda, Gone to Earth has often been shown or released as The Wild Heart.

                  The best & simplest way to tell them apart is that The Wild Heart starts with a shot of the Selznick mansion. They should both be shown & seen in glorious Technicolor of course

                  BTW they aren’t versions of the same film. The Wild Heart has enough differences (& a different director) to be considered as a different title. It was made from Gone to Earth when Selznick sued (& lost to) P&P when he wasn’t happy with their version. But he retained the right to remake his own film from P&P’s original for the US market. The IMDb used to list them as different films but have recently merged them. I’ve asked them to split them again.

                  Steve

              • Just watched 'The Quiet Earth' (1985) on DVD, a New Zealand film but they had a small union jack in the corner of their flag the last time I looked so perhaps it qualifies to be in this Brit film website?



                It's sci-fi and opens in classic sci-fi style with a bloke waking up one morning in NZ to find everybody on earth has vanished.
                That's a great hook to make us keep watching as he goes around looking for survivors in the spookily deserted city.

                SPOILER ALERT- The mass disappearance was caused by a big science experiment that went wrong, causing "glitches" in the fabric of the universe, and right at the end the poor bloke gets glitched onto another planet (see artwork above) and the credits begin to roll, so we don't know what happened to him after that.

                WIKI- "The precise meaning of the final scene is left to the audience"
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Qu...rth_%28film%29

                Comment


                • Permissive (1970)

                  Suzy a young girl from the provinces moves in with a friend in London, whose boyfriend is the bass player in a band.
                  After initial rejection, she quickly becomes the bands inhouse groupie, usurping her friend.
                  Gritty and nasty look at the music scene and the low life's who frequent it, in the immediate post hippie era.
                  Tiny, whey faced new comer Maggie Stride does a pretty good as the initially innocent, but later knowing Suzy.
                  With Gay Singleton and Gilbert Wynne.
                  The letdown is perhaps the band themselves. Alan Gorrie and Onnie McIntyre later went on to better things with The Average White Band, but their proto prog rock band Forever More, are pretty crap. They are not exactly the Rolling Stones either, so it's hard to see what any self respective groupie would see in the this bunch of hairy arsed no hopers.
                  Titus Groan also perform a song, which isn't much better.
                  If you can largely ignore the music, this is impressive stuff from director Lindsey Shonteff. it's a pity more of of work isn't available on general release.

                  Comment


                  • Just finished Law &Order (BBC 4X80mins Colour), G. F. Newman's four interrelated plays about the (rotten) state of British justice told from the point of views of The Detective, The Villain, The Brief, and The Prisoner. I remember watching this when it was first broadcast. It caused quite a furore, especially about police corruption, which was historically justified by "Operation Countryman" that showed the inherent and intrinsic corruption in the Met. Brilliant late 70s social realism TV style, with great naturalistic performances from Derek Martin as the D.I. who reckons its time a villain (played by Peter Dean) was sent down so fit him up for a crime, with Ken Campbell as the solicitor. The final part deals with the brutality of prison life, and ends this examination of the British judicial system on a despairing note. Brilliantly written, directed, and acted. Long overdue for a BBC4 repeat, especially as the DVD is OOP and expensive (got mine cheap secondhand). Newman later went on to cast a jaundiced eye on the NHS in 1983's The Nation's Health.
                    Last edited by agutterfan; 27 July 2020, 09:46 PM.

                    Comment


                    • Two For The Road (1967)

                      Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney
                      I have never been very keen on Albert Finney and therefore had never watched this film before,to say it is told in a non linear fashion would certainly be an understatement as it shuttles constantly backwards and forwards (11 years ?) in the relationship between husband and wife Finney and Hepburn.Finney and Hepburn actually portray their parts extremely well and we get to see some lovely cars and delicious scenery between Kent and St Tropez.We only watched this film as we love 'road' movies but it was a very enjoyable film although the constant time shuffling is irritating to say the least .

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
                        The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965)

                        A servant girl uses her charms to to to break into high society.
                        Long, flatulent and very boring attempt to recreate Tom Jones from the Defoe novel.
                        Kim Novak in the title role looks good, but doesn't offer much else by way of acting.
                        The rest of the star cast including Richard Johnson, Angela Lansbury, George Sanders and Leo McKern merely look embarrassed.
                        Indeed, an overlong Tom Jones rip-off, but at least it has the grace of admitting "Any similiarity between this film and any other film is purely coincidental" and I thought Leo McKern seemed to be enjoying himself, although Peter Butterworth was wasted. Kim Novak appears to be out of her depth at times, but it's a handsome production ably directed by Terence Young.

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