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  • Jig-Saw (1943). Another wartime "careless talk costs lives" short, this one featuring bloody idiots with big mouths and the loss of H.M.S. Hibernia and Jimmy Hanley.

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    • Legend of the Witches (1970)

      A documentary on the origins of witchcraft in the UK & how it is still followed in modern times.
      This was shown on Talking Pictures TV late at night & I found it fascinating but definitely on the weird side.
      If nudity & chicken entrails are your thing then this is for you.
      A bit racy for it's time I would have thought.
      Narrated by Guy Standeven.

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      • Travelling Man (1984-85)
        Leigh Lawson
        A 13 part series produced by Granada TV - the plot is based on an Ex Police Drugs Squad Inspector who was framed and given a two year prison sentence.
        Upon his release he finds his wife has emigrated to Canada ,his son has disappeared and all he has left is his narrow boat which he uses to solve the puzzle of his 'Frame Up' and locate his missing son
        Much of the location work was done in the north west of England - including the Chirk and Marple Aqueducts and some lovely canal scenes - quite an enjoyable series so far - we are 3/4 way through it and it is great snapshot of the early 80's.
        Quite a few familiar faces - last night included John Bird.

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        • Originally posted by BVS View Post
          Travelling Man (1984-85)
          Leigh Lawson
          A 13 part series produced by Granada TV - the plot is based on an Ex Police Drugs Squad Inspector who was framed and given a two year prison sentence.
          Upon his release he finds his wife has emigrated to Canada ,his son has disappeared and all he has left is his narrow boat which he uses to solve the puzzle of his 'Frame Up' and locate his missing son
          Much of the location work was done in the north west of England - including the Chirk and Marple Aqueducts and some lovely canal scenes - quite an enjoyable series so far - we are 3/4 way through it and it is great snapshot of the early 80's.
          Quite a few familiar faces - last night included John Bird.
          Great series!

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          • Porco Rosso (1992)

            Well we do not often watch an animated film as an evening movie.
            As some will be aware - we are aviation enthusiasts.
            Porco is a 1920's Italian Seaplane Pilot (who has been turned into a pig via a curse) who hunts Air Pirates in the Aegean Sea.
            All the Flying Boat/Seaplanes featured in this lovely film are either a faithful copy of actual aircraft of the time or heavily based on one and recognisably so.
            Great entertainment - especially if you have knowledge/interest in aviation history

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            • Originally posted by BVS View Post
              Porco Rosso (1992)

              Great entertainment - especially if you have knowledge/interest in aviation history

              ...and if you're a Miyazaki fan!

              Porco Rosso is one of his best, but Laputa(Castle in The Sky) is my favourite. Lots of airships too for the aviation fans.
              Last edited by narabdela; 30 July 2020, 10:57 AM.

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              • BVS
                BVS commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Nara - Animated films are not generally of much interest to me but obviously Porco is a little different to most

            • Originally posted by wadsy View Post
              Legend of the Witches (1970)

              A documentary on the origins of witchcraft in the UK & how it is still followed in modern times.
              This was shown on Talking Pictures TV late at night & I found it fascinating but definitely on the weird side.
              If nudity & chicken entrails are your thing then this is for you.
              A bit racy for it's time I would have thought.
              Narrated by Guy Standeven.
              I have it recorded, thanks for the warning.

              Comment


              • Spectre TV (1977)

                A leading Criminologist and expert on the occult, travels with his friend a Doctor, to the UK to discover whether an aristocrat has been possessed by an evil spirit.
                An unsuccessful pilot for a possible TV series, co scripted by Gene Roddenberry.
                The trouble is though it adds nothing new to the genre, which it needed, as the interest in this sort of supernatural story was starting to decline after Nightstalker ended.
                The acting from Robert Culp and Gig Young in the leads is so so, James Villiers does his sneering posh routine as the aristo, John Hurt is his younger Brother (Despite looking nothing like each other and Villiers being nearly a foot taller) and Ann Bell is the love interest.
                The special effects also are decidedly grotty with a laughable monster.
                With Gordon Jackson, Majel Barrett, Jenny Runacre.

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                • I watched a few last night the first one was Who killed the cat? I won't spoil the end but it was an enjoyable little film and for once I was stumped as to the killer. I also noticed that the script was by Arnold Ridley of Dad's Army fame the reliable old Mr Godfrey. The second film was the Phantom Ship starring Bela Lugosi in an early Hammer feature, I couldn't get over how much the Ships captain reminded me of Ralph Richardson you would swear that it was him in a few scenes, overall we all know the mystery of the Marie Celeste yet this film proves that the mystery may have been more Earthbound. Poor old Bela was "Armless" in his role of the tortured soul fighting off his inner demons. I also noticed that Dennis Hoey had a role before his Sherlock Holmes days.

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                  • Legend of the Werewolf (1975)

                    Fairly lively and engaging fur and fang flick from Tyburn, with Peter Cushing as the 19th century Parisian Police Surgeon, investigating a string of gory deaths.
                    David Rintoul is the tragic hirsute young man, given the task of munching his way through the supporting cast, whilst those inveterate scene stealers Hugh Griffiths and Ron Moody merely chew the scenery, in guest star roles.
                    At one point mid metamorphosis, Mr Rintoul begins to look remarkably like the late great Naturalist David Bellamy

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                    • The Grass is Greener (1960). "Sophisticated" comedy of manners when Lady Hilary embarks upon an amazingly lightning affair with American millionaire Charles. Her husband Victor, Earl of Rhyall, then embarks upon an elaborate scheme to win her back.
                      Despite the presence of Deborah Kerr as Hilary, Robert Mitchum as Charles and Cary Grant as Victor, this is a long and rather dull old fashioned piece, routinely directed by Stanley Donen, and struggles to escape its stage origins. Nobody seems particularly comfortable in their roles, Mitchum particularly uneasy and dreary, and Jean Simmons playing Hilary's friend is overly arch. The best bit is Noel Coward's song "The Stately Homes of England".

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                      • Madame Sin (TV) 1971

                        A former CIA agent is brainwashed by a female criminal mastermind, into stealing a Polaris submarine from a Scottish base.
                        Fairly hilarious piece of sub Bondery, with Bette Davis as a sort of lady Fu Manchu.
                        A good support cast of Brit favourites and some lovely Scottish scenery help the nonsense along.
                        Robert Wagner, Gordon Jackson, Denholm Elliot and Dudley Sutton.

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                        • Phase 1V (1974)

                          Two scientists in a laboratory in the middle of the desert try to stop ants from taking over the world.
                          Michael Murphy, Nigel Davenport, Lynne Frederick, Alan Gifford & Helen Horton.
                          This really surprised me as I was expecting the usual giant insect horror flick.
                          Instead this is an intelligent film with excellent acting & some fascinating insights into ant behaviour.
                          The two leads are very good & gorgeous Lynne Frederick has long been one of my favourites.
                          The real stars however are the ants & the intelligence they have. Their ability to adapt is frightening indeed.
                          Last edited by wadsy; 3 August 2020, 07:02 PM.

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                          • Churchill (2016). Another 21st century revisionist view of the man which shows him implacably opposed to D-Day as he was haunted by the disaster of Gallipoli, and portrayed as out of date, dismissed by everyone, including his wife, somewhat irrational and certainly irrelevant, needing female support and advice (as opposed to alcohol!) to make decisions. Although Brian Cox looks remarkably like Churchill, he plays him as a much older man than he was in 1944 and certainly emphasises his weaknesses. I would also question the role of his missus Clemmie (Miranda Richardson) in stomping into the War Room to order the Prime Minister about. None of the other actors look remotely like their real life counterparts possibly apart from John Slattery as Eisenhower, and although Churchill makes an important speech at the end, you have to wonder how much reality was stretched to provide the dramatic points the film wanted to make.

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                            • Hitler The Last Ten Days (1973)

                              In the bunker with Adolf, Eva Braun and their military team including Goebbels and Martin Bormann, during April 1945.
                              A UK Italy co production. with Alec Guinness as Der Fuhrer and Doris Kunstmann as Eva.
                              The claustrophobia of an impregnable fortress sixty feet under Berlin, is nicely realised, but it fails as a whole because Alec Guinness isn't a very good Hitler.
                              There's no hint of any German from Alec, he just has his familiar voice beloved of impressionists.
                              He's just too nice, even when he's stamping his feet, you feel he wants to apologise.
                              The bevy of English actors include Mark Kingston as Bormann, John Bennett as Goebbels alongside Joss Ackland, Simon Ward, Diane Cilento, Eric Porter, and Andrew Sachs. all with their RP accents intact

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