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  • Originally posted by wadsy View Post
    Yes that's right. It's like a boat on wheels.
    That contraption is not at St. Michael's Mount, it's at Burgh Island in Devon. When the tide is in at St. Michael's Mount, boats ferry you back and forth.

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    • There's an amphicraft that takes people across at St Michael's Mount.

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      The machine at Bigbury-on-Sea is quite different.

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      • Thanks all for the extra info. So I do remember something about that film...
        Last edited by StoneAgeMan; 20 September 2020, 11:17 AM.

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        • I watched the Inspector Hornleigh trilogy on Youtube last night and as far as I could remember this was my first viewing. Mr Harker and Sim had a nice chemistry on screen but it was Sim who stole the series, the tall one who looks intelligent and isn't. In the third film we even get a short scene of another inspector speaking from inside a Police Box (TARDIS).

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BABU...=DNNTVCLASSICS

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          • agutterfan
            agutterfan commented
            Editing a comment
            I bet it was smaller on the inside though.
            Last edited by agutterfan; 21 September 2020, 04:00 PM.

          • narabdela
            narabdela commented
            Editing a comment
            I hate it when original aspect ratios aren't respected.

        • The Gorgon (Hammer 1964. Peter Cushing, Barbara Shelley et al). I've been hesitating writing the following as it's a bit of a rant, but at least it's about a British film. Moderators please remove if it's too far OT.
          My comments are mainly in connection with the heavy-handed restoration of this film rather than its content or artistic merit. I caught this film in it's 'digitally restored' version last night and for the first 20 minutes I was shouting at my TV that Sony Classic Movies had obviously picked some cheap videotape production rather than the Hammer 1964 original. To my eyes, it looked like a 1990's US studio-bound VT production, made for a pittance on some unused back-lot. But then I spotted Peter Cushing, followed by Barbara Shelley and began to wonder if I was going insane - how could they be in such a relatively recent production? So in the ad-break I looked up the film on the 'net and discovered that The Gorgon had been given the full restoration treatment a few years ago, and IMO obviously by someone who knew nothing about the subtleties or nuances of film. As well as removing the grain, the marks and the blemishes, the technician had gone beyond the call of duty and obliterated every trace of 'film sheen' and any sign of the movie ever having been on celluloid at all. This had the effect of highlighting the rather cheap production techniques employed by Hammer and the overall result was pretty sad.
          And breathe. Sorry chaps, I had to get it off my chest.

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          • tv horror
            tv horror commented
            Editing a comment
            So it left you STONEY FACED?

        • Nun's on the Run (1990)

          Well they don't run very far, mostly around Chiswick, in this tale of two minor crooks that abscond with a fortune that the Triads and London villains are after.
          Slapstick comedy that wants to emulate the sort of comedy that Norman Wisdom and the Carry On's were churning out in the sixties.
          But even the Carry On's and Norman at their respective weakness, are still funnier than this laboured effort.
          Eric Idle and Robbie Coltrane are the little and large team of the title.
          One of the few jokes that made me laugh, wasn't really a joke at all, but the sight of 300 pound plus Robbie, plus Eric and three other villains trying to make their escape in a Ford Sierra 1.3..
          Getting the bus would have been quicker.

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          • We're currently working our way through series four of The Avengers (again!) and enjoying its silliness. One thing we are noticing more on this run is the rather perfunctory endings. There is always a big fight near the conclusion and that is enough to put a stop to the villains' mischief and tie up all loose ends. Then it's straight onto the tag at the end without any 'explanation bit' that we usually get in this type of show. Still, that's the Avengers for you...

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            • Spring Handicap (1937). The greatest handicap in this mild sentimental comedy is the acting ability of Will Fyffe who mugs throughout and delivers most of his lines as if he was reading off a shopping list. Here he plays Jack Clayton (sic), a failed bookie who can always be relied upon to back the loser and squander his hardworking wife's money. She is played somewhat more subtly by Maire O'Neill and most of the rest of the cast (Frank Pettingell, David Burns, Beatrice Varley and even an uncredited Wilfrid Hyde-White) get through the undemanding 64 minutes quite competently.

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              • The Carpetbaggers (1964) Edward Dmytryk's sprawling saga of 1930's Hollywood starring George Peppard, as the man who uses everybody to get what he wants, and a great farewell performance from Alan Ladd as Nevada Smith about whom a prequel was made in 1966. Bob Cummings is good as a sleazy agent, Carrol Baker simmers through the film which also incudes in the cast Martin Balsam, Lew Ayres and boxer Archie Moore. A pity that Ladd died before the film was released as he never got to see his reviews. From the book by Harold Robbins, Enjoyed it.

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                • orpheum
                  orpheum commented
                  Editing a comment
                  George Peppard was truly awful.He didn't age whilst Ladds wigs went from brown to grey.Sadly Ladd committed suicide.

              • The Jackal (1997)

                American remake of the classic 1973 Fred Zinnemann thriller.
                Partly atoned by some excellent set pieces in he modern manner, this is still a clodhopping version, that has none of the clinical coldness of the original.
                Bruce Willis as the Jackal, is about as subtle as one of his own dodgy hairpieces and for an assassin leaves a bloody trail of mayhem that a five year old could follow, as he is paid by the Russian Mafia to take out the head of the FBI.
                Sidney Poitier as the Fed in charge, employs ex IRA man Richard Gere, to help track him down, as you do.
                The Brit's are represented by Leslie Phillips as the Jackal's bank manager, Sophie Okenado as the forger and David Heyman as the Mafia leader.
                Guy Standeven is down as being in this one, but I couldn't spot him in the Pinewood scenes.

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                • The Baker (Damian Lewis, Michael Gambon. Wr/Dir Gareth Lewis 2007). A cheesed-off hit man retires to a sleepy Welsh village in the hope of a quiet life. This is a film which is very easy to like, possibly because the rather dark subject matter is presented in such a cartoonish way. In fact, after watching it I was surprised NOT to see Nick Park's name anywhere in the creative process. It had all his commonly-used attributes, a surreal plot, quirky, cartoon-like characters and a strong sense of wry mischief, and it didn't take much to imagine the actors modelled in plasticine. All the characters except for the key players are ridiculous, one-dimensional figures with almost no back-story. They are there only to be amusing or to be shot. Or both. The whole thing is a real treat and it doesn't out-stay its welcome. Great music too!

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                  • The Big Sleep (1978)

                    Michael Winner's contemporary London set adaptation of the Raymond Chandler novel, would not appear initially to have much going for it.
                    Chandlertown is quintessentially the bluesy, neon lit Los Angeles of the 40's after all.
                    But it's not actually as bad as it sounds. Robert Mitchum is excellent as Philip Marlowe as he was in Farewell My Lovely two years earlier.
                    The screenplay follows the book almost word for word and it all works pretty enjoyably.
                    The cast is great as well. Oliver Reed, Richard Boone, Joan Collins, Edward Fox, Colin Blakely, John Mills.

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                    • Nowhere to Go (1958)

                      A Canadian professional thief breaks out of prison to reclaim his loot gained from stealing valuable coins from a vulnerable elderly woman.
                      His partner in crime has ideas of his own about the loot & the escapee tries to get the money out of a safety deposit box while trying to evade capture.
                      George Nader, Maggie Smith, Bernard Lee, Geoffrey Keen, Bessie Love & Harry H Corbett.
                      An excellent British film noir. It moves along at a fast pace & the acting is top class. Maggie Smith (making her film debut here) looks very young & cute.
                      She & George Nader do have a chemistry between them. ( Apparently they remained lifelong friends after this film.)
                      Nader himself shows he had far more talent than shown in his usual American beefcake roles. He plays the escaped man on the run very well indeed & gave a nice
                      nuanced performance!

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                      • Over She Goes (1937). A corny country house music comedy which is enlivened by better than usual songs and a few witty remarks that raise the occasional chuckle. Stanley Lupino stars in this adaptation of his play and does his usual goofy act aided and abetted by slick Laddie Cliff and soft John Wood. Their belles are Claire Luce, Gina Malo and Sally Gray and Judy Kelly is a femme fatale. Syd Walker is rather good too as a burly and blustering police inspector. Directed at a fair lick by Graham Cutts.

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                        • The Blue Max (1966) George Peppard is the German fighter pilot trying get to the top of the "shot down" list and earn the Blue Max medal by fair means or foul and incurring the wrath of his fellow pilots and his commander during World War One. Jeremy Kemp is his colleague who he is trying to best in the air or in bed with the lovely Ursula Andress who is married to a liberal minded General James Mason who wants George to be his countries hero and is not fussy how he does it. Anton Diffring, Harry Towb and Derren Nesbitt also feature. Jeremy Kemp's superb German accent tops the lot. John Guillermin directs.

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