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  • The Masks of Death (1984)

    in 1926, Doctor Watson relates a tale (through a stenographer) of a plot to poison the British public, by the Germans just before World War 1.
    A Tyburn tale from Kevin Francis, with a rather thin storyline from N.J. Crisp and John Elder. However the spirited playing from it's predominantly elderly cast, especially Peter Cushing and John Mills as Holmes and Watson, just about see's it through.
    With Anton Diffring, Gordon Jackson and Anne Baxter.

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    • Filth (2013). Graphic adaptation of Irvine Welsh's very, very black comic novel by Jon S. Baird with James McAvoy as an Edinburgh detective sergeant desperate for promotion and using all his crafty arts to swing it. At the same time, he's an alcoholic sex maniac and druggie. And indeed, most of his colleagues on the force are too, as they are as rauch as the criminals. Many fantasy sequences (including policemen with helmets covering their private parts despite there being no helmets in Scottish police for many decades ) and any laughs are equalled by nausea. Not equalled surely are the number of credited producers on this, which must be a world record.

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      • Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
        The Masks of Death (1984)

        in 1926, Doctor Watson relates a tale (through a stenographer) of a plot to poison the British public, by the Germans just before World War 1.
        A Tyburn tale from Kevin Francis, with a rather thin storyline from N.J. Crisp and John Elder. However the spirited playing from it's predominantly elderly cast, especially Peter Cushing and John Mills as Holmes and Watson, just about see's it through.
        With Anton Diffring, Gordon Jackson and Anne Baxter.
        You beat me to it, I was just about to post until I noticed your reply. What got me was Ray Milland's blink and you'll miss it performance maybe he had another Lost Weekend! It was nice to see the Tyburn logo on the credits as they really tried to give Hammer a run for their money as Hammer were on their way out of the Gothic productions. As to the plot Sherlock Holmes Game of Shadows stole elements of it for their film. It was nice to see Cushing and Mills together as they made a good team. However when are we ever going to get to see the giant Rat of Sumatra on screen?

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        • Originally posted by tv horror View Post
          It was nice to see the However when are we ever going to get to see the giant Rat of Sumatra on screen?

          Alas, the World is not yet prepared!

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          • It was a P&P double today, although they were both done separately.

            Age of Consent (1969) starring James Mason and the always lovely Helen Mirren on an island in the Great Barrier Reef. Written, produced & directed by Michael Powell.

            Also ...

            Miracle in Soho (1957) starring John Gregson and Belinda Lee in a quite studio bound version of Cosmopolitan Soho in London. Written & produced by Emeric Pressburger.

            Steve

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            • tv horror
              tv horror commented
              Editing a comment
              I would imagine that if it had been shot in black and white that the studio bound setting would have looked more realistic, however I do love "cozy colour" as I refer to these early films such as The Red Shoes which is a classic and of course the colour is important to the fantasy retelling.

          • Anybody watching Kathleen Byron (a regular in 44 episodes along with Raymond Francis and Victor Maddern) in the soap series Together (1980 Southern tv) on TPTV in the afternoons ?

            https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1003253/

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            • Originally posted by julian_craster View Post
              Anybody watching Kathleen Byron (a regular in 44 episodes along with Raymond Francis and Victor Maddern) in the soap series Together (1980 Southern tv) on TPTV in the afternoons ?

              https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1003253/
              I'm sorry but the name doesn't ring a BELL with me.

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              • I think you have seen Black Narcissus..........

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                • tv horror
                  tv horror commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Could be????

              • The Strange Case of the End of Civilisation As We Know It (1977)

                John Cleese and Arthur Lowe are an unlikely Holmes & Watson, out to thwart Professor Moriarty's attempt at world domination.
                A (mercifully) one off comedy made for ITV, with Cleese as a Holmes perpetually exasperated by Lowe's plank thick Watson, complete with bionic nose.
                The one good joke occurs right at the start of the story, with Ron Moody's none to subtle take on Henry Kissenger, getting his peace keeping dates wrong.
                Otherwise it's all pretty excruciating, with racist stereotypes and a leather clad female Moriarty in the shapely form of Connie Booth.
                With Denholm Elliot.


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                • agutterfan
                  agutterfan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Never heard of it. John Cleese has kept that quiet. See it's on YouTube, so will catch later.

                • Tigon Man
                  Tigon Man commented
                  Editing a comment
                  The You Tube copy is watchable, but annoyingly in segments.
                  Strange Case is one of those shows, that I would have found funny when I was young, now it's merely embarrassing.

              • I remember Together well for some reason and I didn't think I'd ever see it again.Not the most scilliating of dramas but at least it featured older central characters. The second series was better with the theme song performed by Cleo Laine and episodes transmitted live.

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                • I watched The Naked Truth on Talking Pictures last night and although the cast was of star quality there just seemed something off in the way the film played out. While I love British comedies at the best of times this one just fell flat and I can't place my finger on where? Peter Sellars in disguise worked well however his character of Sonny did not he came across as a very unlikeable character, yes I know that he was supposed to be portrayed like that for the blackmail to work but it did not help the film as Sellars seemed bored with the part. The film also seemed badly edited from one scene to another maybe that was the reason. Overall I was very disappointed and it spoilt any fun to be had, if anyone Terry Thomas stole what laughs there were.

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                  • Andy2
                    Andy2 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I know what you mean. It's a rather 'bitty' production and doesn't flow well. Like you, I like these old 50's/60's British comedies but this one I find very easy to turn off. In my opinion, Peter Sellers was a bit of a one-trick pony and does the same thing in 'Battle of the Sexes' with his disguises, voices etc. The Naked truth is quite watchable if you get yourself in the right mood and there are some amusing bits, but overall it's one of the weakest IMO.

                • The Black Panther-1977

                  This was hard work as it took nearly an hour to get going and it is only 95mins long.

                  Exploitative of the subject matter,Yes so much so it got banned in cinemas and pulled from release.

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                  • The Lady from Lisbon (1942). With three Mona Lisas being bounced about, The Lady from the Louvre might have been a more apt title for this convoluted wartime comedy thriller.
                    At the Hotel Mirabella in Lisbon, international guests all congregate and try to outdo each other with their various cons and comic opera accents. It's really quite difficult to keep track of the comings and goings and which Mona Lisa is which, but at least the cast enter into the proceedings with considerable gusto and in the case of top-billed Francis L. Sullivan as a South American despot, with considerable girth. Also with Jane Carr, Martita Hunt, Ian Fleming and Wilfrid Hyde-White.

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                    • A Hard Day's Night (1964). I watched this on what would have been John Lennpn's 80th birthday. A day and a bit in the life of The Beatles when Beatlemania was at it's height. Good fun and good songs as the four lads prepare for a concert at the old Scala Theatre in London's West End . For me the acting honours go to Ringo Starr and Wilfred Bramble who plays Paul's grandfather. Norman Rossington as the beleaguered road manager and John Junkin as his assistant. Richard Lester directs. The final concert in fact was played in an empty theatre with the screaming audience added on later as they watched the film of the lads performing the songs.

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                      • Stardust (1974). Depressing and predictable sequel to That'll Be the Day (1973) with David Essex as Jim MacLaine becoming a pop megastar who is manipulated by all and sundry and he descends into seclusion and drugs. Larry Hagman plays his American agent and Adam Faith takes over from Ringo Starr as his pal and manager Mike. The original songs are few and far between and not particularly memorable.

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