Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Watched Last Night

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Bliss of Mrs. Blossom (1968). A far-fetched concept (a lover secretly living in the attic for years) is apparently based on a true story. But it's quite a tedious haul through this, an ultra-sixties flashy job with surreal fantasy sequences that make the thing like a cross between a Joe Orton sex comedy and a Spike Milligan Q programme. Mrs. Blossom is Shirley MacLaine, Richard Attenborough her brassiere-manufacturing husband and James Booth her costume-changing loft lover. Despite the appearances of Freddie Jones as an overly camp detective sergeant, Bob Monkhouse as a way-out Harley Street psychiatrist and reliables like Patricia Routledge, Clive Dunn, Barry Humphries, John Cleese and Frank Thornton and the gaudiest production design yet from Assheton Gorton, this is a considerable dud that clearly thinks it's much funnier than it is and Joseph McGrath's out-of-it direction just becomes overdone and irritating.

    Comment


    • Your description could apply to a lot of other films of this era......!

      Comment


      • narabdela
        narabdela commented
        Editing a comment
        Indeed. I'm amazed by the number of films from the latter half of the sixties that are pretty much unwatchable now.

    • The Wrong Box (1966). A much more traditional 60s comedy, even if it does has its self-aware moments, with lots of Victorian confusion over wrong boxes, wrong bodies and competing cousins with decent direction by Bryan Forbes and a lovely whimsical score by John Barry.
      To win a tontine, brothers murderous blaggard Masterman Finsbury (John Mills) and mammoth bore Joseph Finsbury (Ralph Richardson), last survivors of a childhood lottery, have to outlive one another to win a fortune and greedy (Peter Cook, Dudley Moore) and unwitting (Michael Caine, Nanette Newman) relatives entangle themselves in much mischief and occasional slapstick. Cook is probably one of the the better of them, a Dick Dastardly of the 19th century, while Caine and Newman seem a bit uncomfortable at times. However, Peter Sellers puts in a self-indulgent but quite funny performance as a corrupt cat-ridden doctor with a false nose and Tony Hancock overplays as a police inspector, but there are solid, nicely-judged comic appearances from Thorley Walters, John Le Mesurier and Cicely Courtneidge. They are all of course completely eclipsed by Wilfrid Lawson, totally wrecked, as the sozzled and decrepit loyal Finsbury butler Peacock.

      Comment


      • tv horror
        tv horror commented
        Editing a comment
        Do you hear me...Eggs!

      • Tigon Man
        Tigon Man commented
        Editing a comment
        Peter Sellers was brilliant in this!
        Using a kitten as a blotter, priceless

    • It's All Over Town (1963). A musical fantasy featurette with Frankie Vaughan doing his cheesy act and giving himself the moonlight plus songs from The Springfields, The Hollies, The Bachelors, Clodagh Rodgers, Acker Bilk and others you've never heard of. It seems a bit dated for 1963 and the "comedy" from Lance Percival and Willie Rushton (most of the film is Lance's dream promoting Paul Raymond's Bunnies and strippers) is pretty tiresome. It's at its best when It's All Over.

      Comment


      • The Damned (Oliver Reed, Shirley Anne Field, Dir Joseph Losey 1962). Apparently this film was based on the novel 'Children of the Light' by H.L. Lawrence. I haven't read it, but I have doubts that it was quite as disjointed and patchy as this film. It's almost as if two entirely different stories have been bolted together with little effort to integrate the two. The first concerns a thuggish group of bikers ('teddy boys') who terrorise the peaceful town of Weymouth. The leader of these oiks - 'King' - is played by Oliver Reed in much the same way he plays everything else ie, loud, overbearing and narcissistic. He controls his kid sister with an iron hand and doesn't take kindly to an older man moving in on her. She sure is pretty and sexy, but her acting is mostly solid Oak.
        Then we get the second story. The teddy boys chase our older man into the cliffs and stumble upon a bunker inhabited by a number of strange children who are being 'hardened' for the inevitable nuclear war. In charge of these proceedings is Alexander Knox, who IMO puts in the only good performance in the entire 91 minutes (although it seems longer). The real star of the show is the crisp, detailed black & white photography, it really does look nice.

        Comment


        • Ooh . . . you are Awful (1972). Well, indeed it is and the American title, Get Charlie Tully, is more relevant if not so critically perceptive. In its day, Dick Emery's Saturday night sketch show was reasonably funny, but dragging the sketches out with a number of his well-known characters to 97 minutes asks for trouble. Dick is Charlie who cons half a million knicker off a couple of Italians and as a result has both the Mafia and Derren Nesbitt's camp villain after him. The thing really hits the bottom four times over as the MacGuffin is a Swiss bank account number which is tattooed on the backsides of a quartet of girls.
          Many familiar faces turn up en route such as Ronald Fraser, William Franklyn, Norman Bird, Cheryl Kennedy, Liza Goddard and Brian Oulton, but none of them can raise much of a titter and so I can't finish the catchphrase and say "but I like you". However, there can't be many feature films that have Pat Coombs as its leading lady.

          Comment


          • tv horror
            tv horror commented
            Editing a comment
            "which is tattooed on the backsides of a quartet of girls."
            That's a bit of a cheek!

        • Take Me High (1973). I'd rather they take me away from this really silly musical, designed to be Cliff Richard's comeback film and making it his farewell one instead. He's a merchant banker, and a smarmy one at that, sent to Birmingham where he sets up a huge financial deal between bitter rivals Hugh Griffith and George Cole, thwarts his rival Anthony Andrews, and falls in love with Debbie Watling over a frying pan with a disgusting-looking "Brumburger" sizzling away. Debbie herself said the storyline was crazy, her received pronunciation hardly fitting her character's Birmingham origins, and the forgettable songs, all 13 of them, are hardly integrated into the "plot". At least there is no dancing, although Cliff swans about the centre of the city during a parade for the burger as if he thought there was.

          Comment


          • tv horror
            tv horror commented
            Editing a comment
            Did no one tell him to BURGER off!

          • cassidy
            cassidy commented
            Editing a comment
            Maybe they just told him to Move It !!

        • Law and Disorder (1958).
          A comedy film in which Michael Redgrave (who looks like he is having a great time) plays a criminal who keeps getting sent to jail for various law breaking schemes. He has kept his jail time a secret from his son and decides to try and go straight when he finds his son now works alongside the judge who has repeatedly sent him to jail for many years.
          Robert Morley is great as the judge and there are a few familiar faces in Joan Hickson, Lional Jeffries, John Le Mesurier and Elizabeth Sellers in fine supporting roles.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Jamie J View Post
            Law and Disorder (1958).
            A comedy film in which Michael Redgrave (who looks like he is having a great time) plays a criminal who keeps getting sent to jail for various law breaking schemes. He has kept his jail time a secret from his son and decides to try and go straight when he finds his son now works alongside the judge who has repeatedly sent him to jail for many years.
            Robert Morley is great as the judge and there are a few familiar faces in Joan Hickson, Lional Jeffries, John Le Mesurier and Elizabeth Sellers in fine supporting roles.
            That was my choice too. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
              Take Me High (1973). I'd rather they take me away from this really silly musical, designed to be Cliff Richard's comeback film and making it his farewell one instead. He's a merchant banker, and a smarmy one at that, sent to Birmingham where he sets up a huge financial deal between bitter rivals Hugh Griffith and George Cole, thwarts his rival Anthony Andrews, and falls in love with Debbie Watling over a frying pan with a disgusting-looking "Brumburger" sizzling away. Debbie herself said the storyline was crazy, her received pronunciation hardly fitting her character's Birmingham origins, and the forgettable songs, all 13 of them, are hardly integrated into the "plot". At least there is no dancing, although Cliff swans about the centre of the city during a parade for the burger as if he thought there was.
              They were the type of films that had flimsy plots and people went to see their idols regardless (Elvis being another example ) plus it helps to sell their tunes

              This film never got a DVD release until 2019 but there was a freebie given away with the (cough) Daily Mail beforehand.
              Last edited by Silver Bullet; 27 October 2020, 11:08 PM.

              Comment


              • tv horror
                tv horror commented
                Editing a comment
                FREE! You mean they never paid you to take a copy?

            • The Body Stealers (George Sanders, Patrick Allen 1969). This is a fairly typical low-budget British sci-fi from the late 60's, and has as its 'stars' George Sanders and Patrick Allen, themselves quite common in such films. Things kick off to a fairly intriguing start, when parachutists start disappearing mid-jump. It's serious enough to make even the Army put down their cups of tea and investigate - or rather to call in top-whack investigator and philanderer Bob Megan (Allen) to see if he can get to the bottom of it. He sets about his task by doing a good deal of leering at various secretaries and pretty young scientists before waving a Geiger counter around and meeting a mysterious lady on the beach at midnight. She's no raving beauty but Bob has a go anyway, before wandering back to his digs and looking like he might manage a quick one with his over-the-hill landlady. But no, he's got a busy day ahead. Quite what happens next is spoiler territory and I can't remember anyway, except that a left over flying saucer last seen in 'Daleks Invasion Earth' turns up for no good reason. Worth a go if you like wondering how much the actors got paid and why.

              Comment


              • The Ghoul (1975)

                Remake of the 1933 horror starring Boris Karloff.
                Notable mostly for Don Henderson as the titular character, displaying the most revolting plates of meat since the Carry On Oddbod's.
                The last time those foul feet had seen a pedicure, is any ones guess.
                The film actually reminded me of a Carry On at times, with it's obvious sets and limited budget.
                Peter Cushing is the recluse in the big house, with something nasty lurking in an upstairs.
                Gwen Watford is downstairs in the kitchen chopping up it's lunch.
                Ian McCulloch, Veronica Carlson, Alexandra Bastedo and Stewart Bevan are the luckless hoorays.
                From Kevin Francis at Tyburn.

                Comment


                • tv horror
                  tv horror commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I quite liked the production values of this film and it was drastically let down by the ghouls appearance (large feet included). I thought that the actors played their parts well and John Hurt was in sleazy fine form.

                • agutterfan
                  agutterfan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I have the Japanese version, whose sole improvement is the voluptuous Veronica in a bathtub. And I'm sure there's a scene cut from the final film, where the John Hurt character inadvertently lets on the plot to Ms Bastedo. To make such a lacklustre film, when you've got both Veronica and Alexandra, requires a filmmaking technique of an astonishing ineptitude.
                  Last edited by agutterfan; 1 November 2020, 02:59 PM.

              • Dominique (1978)

                A wealthy woman hounded to her death by her greedy husband, comes back from the dead to seek revenge.
                Milton Subotsky, post Amicus and with some Canadian finance, is the producer on this one and pretty disappointing it is.
                Cliff Robertson is the cold hearted business executive and Jean Simmons is his unloved wife.
                But the victimised lady in the big house, who thinks she is going mad, has all been done before, much better, mostly by Hammer.
                There is a stellar cast to enjoy though. With Jenny Agutter, Simon Ward, Michael Jayston, Judy Geeson, Ron Moody, David Tomlinson, Flora Robson and even Jack Warner in a cameo as a Stone Mason.

                Comment


                • agutterfan
                  agutterfan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Of course, as a fan of Jenny, I have this film in my collection. It's main disappointment for me was it's murky cinematography. The release print is so bad that during some dark scenes it's impossible to see anything. I kept muttering to myself "turn the lights on somebody"!!!!

                • Tigon Man
                  Tigon Man commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Jenny looks lovely as always, but has to cope with some dreadful dialogue and a very wooden performance from co-star Simon Ward.

              • I watched Tom Brown's Schooldays 1940 last night and found it lacklustre compared to the Robert Newton version. I just could not imagine a Dead End kid as Flashman, John Forrest played the part with more relish and didn't seem to have a good bone in his body. While watching I was remind of Chumps at Oxford and half expected Stan and Ollie to turn round the school's corridor! There was very little atmosphere and Cedric Hardwicke seemed to breeze through the part of the Headmaster Robert Newton beat him hands down in my opinion. Still it was nice to watch a much rarer version, although there was one troubling plot detail that had me wondering and that was the ending of the Brown East friendship? I know they showed a clip of them shaking hands but that never explained East's feud only that it was the Headmasters last wish. I've never read the novel so maybe the answer is in there. I'm off to have a "Murphy" now.

                Comment


                • The Yellow Balloon (1953). Young Frankie Palmer thinks he has killed his pal Ron Williams over the theft of a yellow balloon and small time crook Len, who has seen what happened, manipulates Frankie into helping him with his criminal activities which ultimately result in murder and extreme danger for the boy.
                  Rather good thriller with an excellent believable performance by Andrew Ray as Frankie and for once, even a semi-decent one from William Sylvester as the nasty Len. Other familiar faces include Kenneth More and Kathleen Ryan as Frankie's parents, Bernard Lee, Peter Jones, Sidney James, Sandra Dorne and Hy Hazell. Director J. Lee Thompson nicely stages and Gil Taylor atmospherically lights a literally gripping climax in a disused underground station.
                  This one must have had a profound effect on my parents as they always referred to the film in glowing terms.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X