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  • The Bliss of Mrs. Blossom (1968). A far-fetched concept (a lover secretly living in the attic for years) is apparently based on a true story. But it's quite a tedious haul through this, an ultra-sixties flashy job with surreal fantasy sequences that make the thing like a cross between a Joe Orton sex comedy and a Spike Milligan Q programme. Mrs. Blossom is Shirley MacLaine, Richard Attenborough her brassiere-manufacturing husband and James Booth her costume-changing loft lover. Despite the appearances of Freddie Jones as an overly camp detective sergeant, Bob Monkhouse as a way-out Harley Street psychiatrist and reliables like Patricia Routledge, Clive Dunn, Barry Humphries, John Cleese and Frank Thornton and the gaudiest production design yet from Assheton Gorton, this is a considerable dud that clearly thinks it's much funnier than it is and Joseph McGrath's out-of-it direction just becomes overdone and irritating.

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    • Your description could apply to a lot of other films of this era......!

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      • narabdela
        narabdela commented
        Editing a comment
        Indeed. I'm amazed by the number of films from the latter half of the sixties that are pretty much unwatchable now.

    • The Wrong Box (1966). A much more traditional 60s comedy, even if it does has its self-aware moments, with lots of Victorian confusion over wrong boxes, wrong bodies and competing cousins with decent direction by Bryan Forbes and a lovely whimsical score by John Barry.
      To win a tontine, brothers murderous blaggard Masterman Finsbury (John Mills) and mammoth bore Joseph Finsbury (Ralph Richardson), last survivors of a childhood lottery, have to outlive one another to win a fortune and greedy (Peter Cook, Dudley Moore) and unwitting (Michael Caine, Nanette Newman) relatives entangle themselves in much mischief and occasional slapstick. Cook is probably one of the the better of them, a Dick Dastardly of the 19th century, while Caine and Newman seem a bit uncomfortable at times. However, Peter Sellers puts in a self-indulgent but quite funny performance as a corrupt cat-ridden doctor with a false nose and Tony Hancock overplays as a police inspector, but there are solid, nicely-judged comic appearances from Thorley Walters, John Le Mesurier and Cicely Courtneidge. They are all of course completely eclipsed by Wilfrid Lawson, totally wrecked, as the sozzled and decrepit loyal Finsbury butler Peacock.

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      • tv horror
        tv horror commented
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        Do you hear me...Eggs!

      • Tigon Man
        Tigon Man commented
        Editing a comment
        Peter Sellers was brilliant in this!
        Using a kitten as a blotter, priceless

    • It's All Over Town (1963). A musical fantasy featurette with Frankie Vaughan doing his cheesy act and giving himself the moonlight plus songs from The Springfields, The Hollies, The Bachelors, Clodagh Rodgers, Acker Bilk and others you've never heard of. It seems a bit dated for 1963 and the "comedy" from Lance Percival and Willie Rushton (most of the film is Lance's dream promoting Paul Raymond's Bunnies and strippers) is pretty tiresome. It's at its best when It's All Over.

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