Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Watched Last Night

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Up the Junction (1967). Rich girl Polly leaves her mansion in Chelsea to go and work in a Battersea sweet factory and live in a rotting flat with third-hand furniture. She meets working lad Peter whose view of life is the complete opposite as he finds "real life" intolerable and seeks a way to have the "good life" Polly wants to leave behind.
    A contrived clash of class which wins out due to some decent dramatic, comic and in the case of Aubrey Morris and Hylda Baker, grotesque performances. Suzy Kendall is Polly and Dennis Waterman is Peter and there's excellent work from Maureen Lipman and Adrienne Posta with Liz Fraser as their battleaxe mum, plus some great 60s settings. The gritty work scenes, an abortion and a fatal accident earned the film its "X" certificate, but the direction from Peter Collinson is not at all flashy and there's a rather nice soundtrack from Mike Hugg and Manfred Mann.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
      Up the Junction (1967). Rich girl Polly leaves her mansion in Chelsea to go and work in a Battersea sweet factory and live in a rotting flat with third-hand furniture. She meets working lad Peter whose view of life is the complete opposite as he finds "real life" intolerable and seeks a way to have the "good life" Polly wants to leave behind.
      A contrived clash of class which wins out due to some decent dramatic, comic and in the case of Aubrey Morris and Hylda Baker, grotesque performances. Suzy Kendall is Polly and Dennis Waterman is Peter and there's excellent work from Maureen Lipman and Adrienne Posta with Liz Fraser as their battleaxe mum, plus some great 60s settings. The gritty work scenes, an abortion and a fatal accident earned the film its "X" certificate, but the direction from Peter Collinson is not at all flashy and there's a rather nice soundtrack from Mike Hugg and Manfred Mann.
      A favourite of mine. I was on a Zoom meeting recently where Maureen Lipman was the guest speaker and I asked her about the making of Up the Junction. She said it was a lot of fun and got on well with Adrienne Posta and co. I didn't realise that Susan George was in it until Maureen mentioned that it was one of her first films. Good choice as always Gerald.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

        I remember having to sit through Live It Up when I was taken to see A Stitch in Time at the local Odeon the week after Christmas 1963. All I remembered of it was Patsy Ann Noble singing Accidents Will Happen.
        You were lucky - I had to sit through Summer Holiday in 1963 (I think my dad had the hots for Una Stubbs LOL)
        He also took me to the flicks to see Top Of The Pops '64 (i think that was the title) which I guess was a cinematic roundup/compilation of some of the top tunes of 1964,but I think he had the hots for one of the singers on that one too

        Comment


        • tv horror
          tv horror commented
          Editing a comment
          That's a GOOD reason to go to the cinema! My own personal reason was Leslie Caron, just thinking of Is Paris Burning and Father Goose brings a smile to my face even now.
          Last edited by tv horror; 21 November 2020, 03:17 PM.

      • Welcome Mr Washington (1944). This little wartime comedy drama shows GIs billeted in a small English village in the best light, but some of the locals not. There's romance too for Barbara (Janet) Mullen with Lootenant Donald Stewart and a lengthy role for Peggy Cummins as Barbara's younger sister. Villagers include Martita Hunt, Shelagh Fraser, Beatrice Varley and George Carney as well as a villainous Roy Emerton.
        Apparently a lost film for a long time, it seems what's now available is an edited version which might explain Mr. Emerton's rather unfocused villainy and no appearances from the credited Graham Moffatt and Louise Lord.

        Comment


        • The Second Mr. Bush (1940). Mild-mannered butterfly collector Jim Bush inherits half a million, and afraid of scroungers (and his battleaxe wife), persuades writer Anthony Carr to impersonate him and pretend to give away his inheritance. Anthony ends up at the impecunious Windel-Tod household and they're out to chisel him.
          A 56 minute comedy which moves like lightning, directed by John Paddy Carstairs, and which has efficient performances from Derrick De Marney, Kay Walsh, Evelyn Roberts and Barbara Everest. There are few laughs, but it's all efficiently made.
          Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 19 November 2020, 06:37 PM.

          Comment


          • The Avengers 'Who was that Man I saw you with?' From the Tara King series. It seems Tara may be working for the enemy. A typically so-so story from The Avengers latter years, but the 'tag' at the end is very funny. Back at Steed's apartment, Tara looks on while Steed builds a Champagne fountain. As he stacks the glasses and the column grows & grows, Tara makes delighted gurgles and does lots of lip smacking and eye-rolling. The symbolism is obvious. She finally lets out 'Ooooh, it's... it's ooooooh!' Steed, who has been concentrating on his construction, takes on the look of a proud boy who is expecting a treat, looks at his work with admiration and says 'wait til you see it working!' This always makes me laugh and sends me away wanting more.
            The Avengers filmed series were always well-supplied with mild innuendo, but this is one of the more blatant examples.
            IMO the tags on this series are the best, all cosy and intimate with LJ's music matching the mood perfectly.
            Last edited by Andy2; 20 November 2020, 09:05 AM.

            Comment


            • Ever Decreasing Circles (1984-89)

              Over the last few weeks we have been watching the complete collection of EDC,with Richard Briers,Peter Egan and of course the lovely Penelope Wilton
              Great value for money as we got the box set from ebay for just over a fiver,I missed the series first time round (too busy) but I honestly think one of the best sitcoms ever made - highly recommended.

              Comment


              • Andy2
                Andy2 commented
                Editing a comment
                I quite agree. We remember it fondly, especially the character of Paul, played by Peter Egan. He had just the trace of an amused smile all the time, as if he couldn't believe he'd moved into such a place. And the wonderful Howard & Hilda...

            • Die Screaming Marianne (1971)

              A disbarred Judge now residing in the Algarve, tries to trace his missing daughter, who holds the key to a family fortune.
              Murray Smith's script starts promisingly enough in London, with the mischievous daughter Marianne (Susan George) marrying herself to the best man (Barry Evans) instead of the groom (Christopher Sandford), but quickly loses it's way, due to production problems and infighting amongst the cast and with Director Peter Walker.
              When the action reaches Portugal it all descends into a lumpy stew in the sun, with murder and overtones of incest, between the Judge (Leo Genn) and Stepdaughter (Judy Huxtable).
              All pretty unpalatable stuff. The Director all but disowned it.

              Comment


              • BVS
                BVS commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes it was a pretty dire picture wasn't it ? so bad it was er - bad

            • Seven Thieves. (Edward G Robinson, Rod Steiger, Joan Collins 1960). Another non-Brit film for us last night. Jolly glad we chose it as it turned out to be a very entertaining 105 minutes. A group of accomplished thieves get together to plan an audacious heist at a Monte Carlo casino. A fairly simple plot but the methods are ingenious, involving an imposter, a wheelchair, a corpse that isn't dead and a shock ending. It makes you wonder if the people behind the later TV series 'Mission Impossible' were fans of this film and thought 'hey, you know....'.
              Edward G puts in a very measured performance and Steiger holds his horses in check for when he needs them.
              I don't know how much the film cost to make but it looks like a million dollars, with beautifully crisp b&w photography and of course a number of well-known stars. Sadly, I couldn't make our telly adopt a suitable aspect ratio for the wide film (streamed from Amazon) and we ended up watching it with everyone looking rather thin!
              Last edited by Andy2; 22 November 2020, 11:50 AM.

              Comment


              • I See A Dark Stranger (1946). I'm often amazed about the subject matters British producers chose in the 40s (whereas Hollywood stuck firmly to genres). Only a year after the war ended this film shouldn't be possible, particularly with a sympathetic portrayal of the main protagonist. That's a young Deborah Kerr, looking gorgeous, and making her historically romantic, innocent and disingenuous character utterly believable. Not to give the plot away (in case you haven't seen it), it's Launder & Gilliat in Hitchcock spy mode, complete with McGuffin. Trevor Howard is the romantic lead, and action hero when called upon, and there's a fine cast of supporting character actors, including everyone who can do an Irish accent. The real surprise was Raymond Huntley, perfectly cold and matter-of-fact as the professional spy. We also have a pre-Hammer George Woodbridge, a pre-Ladykillers Katie Johnson, a pre-Disney David Tomlinson, and a pre-Hollywood Torin Thatcher, to name a few.

                Shot at D&P Studios Denham there's some excellent sets and production design, particularly the English pub and street scene, but there's also some wonderful location shooting in Eire (as it was then), Devon and Isle of Man, a breath of fresh air. Some fine cinematography from Wilkie Cooper, though it's a shame the print was slightly damaged in places, another fine music score from Alwyn & Mathieson, and not too tightly edited by Thelma Myers. The film is helped by some comedic touches, such as the 'fake' funeral trying to cross the Irish border, and the fist fight in a bathroom, which helps the film's credibility (we're obviously not to take the subject matter too seriously), and some wonderfully witty dialogue. E.g. when Howard hits on Kerr having only just met her "You're awfully quick" "Sorry. I've been working very closely with the American Army", Huntley "I've been shot. I've got a bullet inside me" "How do you know that?" "Because it didn't come out", and "I hope this doesn't mean that someone has escaped from the internment camp and is staying at the hotel", " If the food I've had here is anything to go by, they're more likely to escape from the hotel and beat it for the internment camp". And there's a running gag about Oliver Cromwell too.


                If you haven't seen it before, catch it next time it's on Talking Pictures. I'd be interested in hearing other members opinions.

                Comment


                • It's a very good film and I enjoy it greatly.

                  Some then and now shots from the Reelstreets site.

                  https://www.reelstreets.com/films/i-...dark-stranger/

                  Comment


                  • Ghost Stories (2017). A professional debunker of the spirit world is tasked by his idol to look into three unsolved ghostly experiences.
                    What starts out promisingly as a kind of tongue-in-cheek wink at horror anthologies linked by a continuing story, atmospherically lit and directed, eventually falls apart and becomes quite disjointed and, one or two shocks and "buses" apart, ultimately is routinely predictable. The ghosts of the protagonist are really the story. Written and directed by Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman from their stage play.

                    Comment


                    • I watched The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934) on Talking Pictures TV. Mainly to see how similar P&P’s The Elusive Pimpernel (1949) was to it. They were both h made for Korda’s firm, London Films.

                      There are are certainly a lot of similarities

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                        I watched The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934) on Talking Pictures TV. Mainly to see how similar P&P’s The Elusive Pimpernel (1949) was to it. They were both h made for Korda’s firm, London Films.

                        There are are certainly a lot of similarities

                        Steve
                        I just watched the Scarlet Pimpernel after a good many years and it was very enjoyable especially Leslie Howards performance plus Raymond Massey made a great foil (pun). I tend to think of Howards later Pimpernel Smith as an ancestor to the original Sir Percy and the connections don't stop there as the Nazi's also used the Guillotine as a means of execution. What got me was Sir Percy's wife, surely she knew that he was not that foppish when she lived with him. There was also a brief appearance from Nigel Bruce which was a treat. Overall it is a true classic.

                        Comment


                        • The Teckman Mystery (1954)


                          John Justin, Margaret Leighton, Roland Culver, and Raymond Huntley
                          A Novelist is commissioned by his publisher to write the biography of a test pilot who disappeared whilst testing a new aircraft (which suspiciously resembles a Gloster Javelin ).
                          Margaret Leighton impresses in this role,quite an enjoyable film which we had not seen before.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X