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  • Originally posted by Andy2 View Post
    A repeat viewing of The Desperate Hours last night. Stars Humphrey Bogart, Frederic March and Arthur Kennedy. Humph's team of thugs and psychos invade the comfortable middle-class home of the Hilliard family and hold them hostage until some money turns up. We get only a brief introduction to the Hilliards before things kick off and the tension rises slowly for the next hour before the action really gets a grip. One of the team is just a born killer and enjoys his job, while another has his eyes on the pretty daughter. Frederic March is the best I've ever seen him as the father who desperately wants to protect his family and see off the thugs but cannot act because of the likely consequences. Superb stuff, and the last 20 minutes had us shouting at the telly. Bogart puts in a tremendous performance as the almost 100% psychotic killer with just a trace of a human soul ticking somewhere within, despite looking somewhat diminished I presume because of his illness. The film delivers a powerful message about the strength of the decent American family and how it must always triumph against evil and tyranny. This is top twenty stuff, Hollywood at its best.
    What a good choice, Bogart superb in his penultimate film. Nice to see Arthur Kennedy wearing a suit instead of a gunbelt.

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    • Meet the Navy (1946). A showcase for the Royal Canadian Navy's travelling musical show which bursts into Technicolor for the last reel. As usual with this type of film, the "Screen Play" is at best flimsy and just an excuse for countless song and dance routines and performers to play out their corny party pieces. "The Entire Cast are Members of The Royal Canadian Forces" and so there's nobody recognisible except for Lionel Murton, who is the romantic lead, for heaven's sake!

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      • I just watched The Silver Fleet on Talking Pictures TV. It was actually directed by Vernon Sewell and produced by Powell & Pressburger. Starring Ralph Richardson, Googie Withers & Esmond Knight. It’s really a very good tale very well told.

        I especially like Esmond’s performance as the Gestapo officer. It was made shortly after he got out of hospital after losing one eye completely and being blinded in the other eye. But you'd never know he was blind from the way he behaves in most of the film. I especially like the way he eats his macaroni sloppily to show what uncouth brutes the Gestapo were.

        Steve

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        • tv horror
          tv horror commented
          Editing a comment
          Could you see todays Troopers being this dedicated?

      • Delightful (as always), I have just watched A Matter of Life and Death (1946) [aka AMOLAD] on BBC2. Yes, tears were shed as always. It's a delightful film to watch on Valentine's Day

        Happy Valentine's Day everyone

        Steve

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        • By coincidence AMOLAD was one of the answers on Pointless over the weekend and then it turned up on BBC2 the following day . On Valentines Day our lounge was full of Roses.

          I think we ate the whole tin !!

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          • tv horror
            tv horror commented
            Editing a comment
            You had me at the room was full of "Roses" and I thought how romantic, until I realised it was chocolates!

        • Originally posted by cassidy View Post
          By coincidence AMOLAD was one of the answers on Pointless over the weekend and then it turned up on BBC2 the following day . On Valentines Day our lounge was full of Roses.

          I think we ate the whole tin !!


          Did they make any particular comments about AMOLAD?

          Steve

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post



            Did they make any particular comments about AMOLAD?

            Steve
            No, the contestants had to guess the name of the film from a picture of one of the stars , in this case David Niven in his flying jacket.

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            • Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971). Young bisexual Bob flits between middle-aged Jewish doctor Daniel and headstrong career woman Alex, who both find their relationship with him lifts them out of their respective lifestyles, but he has a life of his own to lead too.
              A compelling and groundbreaking drama from John Schlesinger with excellent performances from Murray Head as Bob, Peter Finch as Daniel and Glenda Jackson as Alex, plus there's some humour too in the outré family life of Vivian Pickles and her husband Frank Windsor.

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              • Victoria & Abdul (2017). A companionpiece to Mrs Brown (1997) and Abdul is the companion of the Queen in the latter days of her reign, much to the consternation of the Prince of Wales and the royal household. Much more comic than the earlier film, Judi Dench nevertheless puts in an even better performance as Victoria and Eddie Izzard is remarkably good as Bertie, soon to be Edward VII. Ali Fazal is Abdul and Tim Pigott-Smith in his last film, Michael Gambon, Simon Callow and Fenella Woolgar also appear. Despite the inevitable inaccuracies (the film actually admits that right at the start), it is beautifully mounted and ably directed by Stephen Frears.

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                • Well, I tried to watch The High Bright Sun with Dirk Bogarde , Denholm Elliot Susan Strasberg and George Chakiris. There was however a problem with the signal in my area which magically came on just after the film had finished so my review will have to wait for another day. I could have watched it on Freeview but the film had already started.

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                  • Only When I Larf (1968)

                    Richard Attenborough leads his team of con artists (David Hemmings and Alexandra Stewart) on various escapades around New York, London and Beirut.
                    After a lively, lengthy pre credit sequence of the gang in New York, where the gang con those old US/UK telly favourites Alan Gifford and David Healy, this raffish comedy quickly becomes rather a bore.
                    I soon began to lose interest in whom was doing what to whom, Dickie is very good though as Silas the head con, finding his position usurped by young upstart Hemmings. Stewart as the love interest, is quite bland and Hemmings treads water,
                    With Terence Alexander.

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                    • I’ve just watched Theirs is the Glory (1946) by Brian Desmond Hurst & Terence Young. Shown on Talking Pictures at 13:45 on Saturday. It’s the story of the American and British armies’ heroic struggle to hold the Arnheim bridge during WWII. It focuses heavily on the British who actually got to the “Bridge too Far” and those holed up at and around the Hartenstein hotel in nearby Oosterbeek

                      Steve

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                      • The Ωmega Factor (BBC Scotland 1979 10X50mins Colour Video/BBC-Simply DD DVD). There's no good images on the net to give a real flavour of this show. Stars James Hazeldine (right) as freelance reporter Tom, who teams up with physicist Anne (Louse Jameson of Leela in Doctor Who fame) who works in the Edinburgh unit of secret government Department 7, investigating the uses of psychic and paranormal activity in intelligence work, headed by the dour and secretive Martindale (centre, John Carlisle of New Scotland Yard fame).

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                        The male-female pair investigating bizarre happenings template had been shown to be successful a decade earlier in The Avengers, and again a decade later with The X-Files, which this series closely resembles (he the investigator, she the 'sceptical' scientist), though set in Scotland and thoroughly human based (no aliens or monsters). Oddly for the time, interior studio & exterior location shooting (and there's some great Edinburgh and surrounding country location shooting) are BOTH shot on Colour video (rather than the norm of 16mm film for exteriors). This stops that jarring physical sensation when switching from interior to exterior, and gives a smooth consistent image throughout (there's even some night shooting).

                        It starts as standalone episodes examining such themes as psychic projection, ultrasonic warfare, ESP, telekinesis and poltergeists, with a recurring character of Drexel, an occultist contemporary of Aleister Crowley, superbly played by Cyril Luckham. The most (in)famous episode was #5 "Powers of Darkness", which involved demonic possession and a man being burned alive, which was condemned by Mary Whitehouse as "thoroughly evil", which shows one of her weaknesses in that she clearly did not understand genre fiction. The episodes are well written, obviously well researched, and played admirably straight by the cast. Sadly, the second half starts to see the plots of the standalone episodes weakened in favour of seasonal story arc, this ruined The X-Files eventually, and is the bane of modern TV. So it starts as intelligent discourse equally mixed with action scenes, to over-talkative episodes with little plot or action, or long scenes of Tom following a woman in a red coat, a sub-plot peremptorily dismissed in the last episode.

                        Although there's a resolution of some kind, I can see why a second series wasn't commissioned. Still, I'm glad I eventually got to see it, certainly episodes 1-7 are well worth the entry fee, especially for the intelligent scripts, great pairing of James and Louise
                        , and the fine prints, which have aged well (only one scene shows damage). For lovers of supernatural telly.

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                        Last edited by agutterfan; 24 February 2021, 09:21 PM.

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                        • Valentino (1977)

                          The short and turbulent life of the 1920's silent movie star Rudolph Valentino.
                          A patchwork biopic, with a few good scenes, including the grief stricken fans crashing as a mob into the funeral home and a boxing match between the diminutive Valentino and the bulky sports reporter Rory O'Neil.
                          Rudolph Nureyev equites himself well as the flamboyant Valentino, but there is little spark between him and Leslie Caron as Nazimova and non at all between him and Michelle Phillips as his second wife, Natasha Rambova. (Rudy and Michelle Phillips allegedly didn't get along either on set)
                          Brit telly stars Felicity Kendal, Peter Vaughan and Alfred Marks also add little to the proceedings.
                          A heroic misfire.

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                          • I watched "Demobbed"(1944), which was only my second viewing, the first time was back in the 80s I believe.
                            It is a raucous, irreverent and cheap comedy written and performed to appeal to world-weary British cinema-goers nearing the end of five years of war. The plot follows four privates and a sergeant as they are demobilised and found jobs in civilian life. They are taken on by a firm that has some lovers, a pompous and shifty manager, a cheeky cleaner and a lot of factory girls.
                            Nat Jackley, Norman Evans, Dan Young and Betty Jumel are the names before the title, with an "and introducing" for Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth. The singers and the Hawaiian Serenaders turn up as acts in two shows that the factory organise. Conveniently, these shows also give the lead actors a chance to do their variety acts and comedy routines. Hence the caption on the title screen "A Musical Comedy Burlesque".
                            My grandfather Jimmy Plant (billed here as James Plant) does his straight man duties as the sergeant and as mentioned elsewhere on this forum, my mother (now 93) can be seen as a 17-year-old walk-on with a line. When it was on TV in the 80s we sat and watched it looking out for her in the background, as all she could remember of the filming was spending a day packing boxes. We nearly fell off our seats when she popped up with a line. This time I also spotted her dancing at the ball with diminutive actor Tony Dalton, which is funny for other reasons as she went on to marry Larry Noble, 5'4".
                            Last edited by StoneAgeMan; 26 February 2021, 05:51 PM. Reason: Corrected spelling of Ziegler

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