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  • The Graduate (1967)
    I had never seen this before,Dusty Hoffman plays the fairly gormless looking graduate (DH always looked gormless) very well - good cast in this movie - there were some similarities with Catch 22 which is maybe not surprising with the team of Mike Nichols and Buck Henry at the helm.
    We did not expect this film to be very good but actually found it very entertaining (it was 'free' on Amazon Prime),I am not a fan of DH but he was perfect for this role,they even managed to find a gormless guard dog to act with DH

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    • Originally posted by BVS View Post
      The Graduate (1967)
      I had never seen this before,Dusty Hoffman plays the fairly gormless looking graduate (DH always looked gormless) very well - good cast in this movie - there were some similarities with Catch 22 which is maybe not surprising with the team of Mike Nichols and Buck Henry at the helm.
      We did not expect this film to be very good but actually found it very entertaining (it was 'free' on Amazon Prime),I am not a fan of DH but he was perfect for this role,they even managed to find a gormless guard dog to act with DH
      As teenagers, we tried to sneak in to see this as it was an "X" and we were underage. We got into the cinema with no bother because unbeknown to us, the programme had been changed and what was now showing was Elvis Presley in Kissin' Cousins.

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      • From nylons to Elvis LOL - watching an Elvis film is almost as bad as watching a Cliff Richard film

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        • Young Wives' Tale (1951). Limp studio-bound comedy that somehow you know is not going to be a cracker as soon as Philip Green's over-anxious jolly main title music starts up.
          Joan Greenwood and Nigel Patrick share with Helen Cherry and Derek Farr and none of them are young, but behave like teenagers and need a nanny to look after only two small children as they are incapable of doing anything themselves except cause chaos. The nannies roped in and then flee are Fabia Drake and Athene Seyler and Guy Middleton wanders in a couple of times tally-ho-ing as usual plus there's Audrey Hepburn flitting about as Nigel's secretary. "From the Comedy by Ronald Jeans".

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          • The Sicilians (1964)

            An American Embassy aide in Paris gets involved with Scotland Yard over the kidnapping of the son of an American Mafia boss.
            Robert Hutton, Ursula Howells, Reginald Marsh, Alex Scott, Robert Ayres. Susan Denny & Eric Pohlmann.
            This Butcher's production is nothing special & the cheap budget shows.
            However it did have one saving grace for me & that was the presence of the beautifully proportioned Aleta Morrison as a speciality dancer!

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            • I watched Water the other day. I remember trying to get this on dvd and having no luck.

              Paul Heiney was in the programme In At The Deep End were he trained for a small role as a mercenary in the film.

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              • I've just watched Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (1969) aka Doppelgänge, starring Roy Thinnes & Ian Hendry. It was shown on the Horror channel but I can't imagine why, there was nothing horrible or shocking in it. ISTR seeing it at the cinema many, many, moons ago & being intrigued by it, but it didn't live up to my memory or expectations of it. It was scripted by Gerry & Sylvia Anderson and there are quite a few Thunderbird style special effects & model work and explosions it it. But the story really doesn't hold up

                The European Space Exploration Council sends two astronauts to explore a planet similar to the Earth but located on the opposite side of the sun. Roy & Ian go there in a spaceship where they discover everything is the same but reversed

                Steve

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                • Eric7885
                  Eric7885 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I saw this film years ago. I personally did not care for it. As you said, nothing horrible or shocking in it. Roy Thinnes, American actor did star in the highly rated telly series, The Invaders later on.

              • We have had a mini WW2 fest in the last week.

                The Eagle has Landed - which i originally thought was not that good when I first watched it - I now find is a really watcheable film,much better than any modern war films.

                The Eye of the Needle - once again I thought it was an average film originally but fares very well against modern war films.

                12 o clock High - A classic with Gregory Peck - always enjoyable but we were disappointed with the video 'quality' after paying for the 'HD' version on amazon prime

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                • Steve Crook
                  Steve Crook commented
                  Editing a comment
                  > The Eagle has Landed - which i originally thought was not that good when I first watched it

                  What, even with the lovely Jenny Agutter?

                • BVS
                  BVS commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hey I guess she just wasn't my cup of tea Steve

              • On thé Double. Starring Dana Wynter and Danny Kay. Released in 1961 from Paramount Pictures. Several British actors had cameo roles in this film. Margaret Rutherford, Wilfred Hyde-White, Diana Dors. I did not care that much for the film. Dana tried to keep it going, but Danny Kay. I was never that fond of his acting. He was a popular actor in the late 1940´ and 1950’s. Probably his most memorable film was White Christmas starring Bing Crosby, released in 1954. I very much enjoyed Margaret Rutherford’s portrayal as Lady Vivian in this film. A passable film for a Saturday afternoon when nothing worth watching on the telly. This film is available on DVD.

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                • Band Waggon (1940). Adapted from "Radio's Greatest Success", this now comes over as self-satisfied and very much of its time with Arthur Askey almost as irritating as he would be in The Ghost Train. As well as dated patter with Richard "Stinker" Murdoch we get the familiar tropes of annoying pompous Peter Gawthorne, big band routines and an apparently haunted castle housing Nazi agents. Forgotten radio personalities mingle with Pat Kirkwood and Moore Marriott and despite lively direction by Marcel Varnel (who apparently didn't take to Big-Hearted Arthur), the eight cooks who wrote this certainly spoiled the broth.

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                  • Enter Inspector Duval (1961). German Anton Diffring is Frenchman Inspector Duval in a rambling crime "B" set in England and filmed in Ireland. The police are on the search for missing diamonds and the mysterious killer cum burglar "Mr. March". It's all pretty below par stuff routinely directed by Max Varnel and the dubbing of Angela McCann as Alice Alvarez is really quite peculiar. The title suggests the start of a series, but it wasn't and so it's also Exit Inspector Duval.

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                    • Eric7885
                      Eric7885 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I remembered him from the film, Where Eagles Dare. Starring Richard Burton, Mary Ure and a young Clint Eastwood. He eventually moved to France where he passed away a few years back.

                  • Dracula (1973) TV

                    Jack Palance puts on the opera cape and dons the fangs, in this US/UK adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic.
                    And with his towering presence, and menacing, whispery staccato delivery, big Jack makes for a pretty scary Count, in a story which at follows (loosely) the original tale.
                    Otherwise a pretty so-so affair, considering the script was from the great Richard Matheson.
                    The location work utilises plenty of familiar locations, Black Park, Oakley Court and High Canons.
                    Nigel Davenport is a robust Van Helsing, Simon Ward is Arthur, Penelope Horner is Mina Harker and Fiona Lewis, Lucy Westonra, Murray Brown as Jonathan Harker.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
                      Dracula (1973) TV

                      Jack Palance puts on the opera cape and dons the fangs, in this US/UK adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic.
                      And with his towering presence, and menacing, whispery staccato delivery, big Jack makes for a pretty scary Count, in a story which at follows (loosely) the original tale.
                      Otherwise a pretty so-so affair, considering the script was from the great Richard Matheson.
                      The location work utilises plenty of familiar locations, Black Park, Oakley Court and High Canons.
                      Nigel Davenport is a robust Van Helsing, Simon Ward is Arthur, Penelope Horner is Mina Harker and Fiona Lewis, Lucy Westonra, Murray Brown as Jonathan Harker.
                      This one must've been the first to bring the romantic backstory into Dracula. Jack is certainly his jittery, sweaty self, but I have never liked the underwhelming conclusion.

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