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  • That's an Order (1954). Somewhat surreal CFF comedy short with slapstick music hall sketches loosely put together starring Peter Butterworth as "Himself" who with little dialogue is dressed like and channels Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel. He is quickly hired as a grocer's boy and the inevitable messy scrapes follow. Getting knocked about with him are Humphrey Kent and Phyllis Morris. Made down the beach and at Brighton Film Studios.

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    • Murder on the Orient Express (2017). Kenneth Branagh is a slimline and physically active Poirot which he needs to be given the size of the moustache he sports in this theatrically-staged version which he also directs. Not much emphasis is placed on the luxurious nature of the train, but there are the expected star turns from the likes of Michelle Pfeiffer, Johnny Depp, Judi Dench, Olivia Colman and Derek Jacobi. We all know who done it and how it all turns out in the end, but it's entertaining enough getting there. The biggest mystery is how Poirot managed to trudge around and on top of the train when it's trapped by an avalanche without him wearing a coat.

      Comment


      • Odeonman
        Odeonman commented
        Editing a comment
        Branagh also used rather unlikely wide body carriages for his interior scenes! If he has done the same with Death on the Nile the boat will be wider than the Nile (which sounds like a line from Moon River).

    • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
      Daddy! My Daddy!

      I’ve just watched The Railway Children (1970) shown on BBC2 this afternoon. It still works I was in tears at the end for that final scene on the platform

      A true classic.

      Steve
      Just watched it again this morning on BBC1. Makes you long for the summer when you see the sunny days in the film. A lovely transfer, by the way, is it available on blu ray?

      Comment


    • The Remains of the Day (1993)

      I came to this production after recently reading the novel.
      It is a reasonably faithful adaptation of the slight novel, and although broadened a little for the big screen, does not suffer unduly for it.
      Anthony Hopkins is superb as the Stevens, the aging Butler of Darlington Hall, seemingly turning a blind eye, to his Master's German appeasement between the wars.
      Emma Thompson does justice also to the role of the Housekeeper Miss Keston.
      Some of the stiffness of Stevens from the novel, seems to have been ironed out of Hopkins's portrayal, so he seems generally less aggrieved at Keston, but it all works pretty well.
      Peter Vaughan totters around as Stevens' aged Father, and James Fox plays posh again, as Lord Darlington.

      Comment


      • Land of the Pharaohs. Released by Warner Brothers in 1955. Big budget production with a British cast. Jack Hawkins, Joan Collins, James Robinson Justice and Alexis Minotis. Filmed in Egypt, some of the scenes were filmed in an actual pyramid. Joan Collins plays the part of a treacherous Royal gold digger. Considering the age of this film, the colour and sound were in excellent condition.

        Comment


        • Odeonman
          Odeonman commented
          Editing a comment
          The only film Howard Hawks made in CinemaScope.

        • Eric7885
          Eric7885 commented
          Editing a comment
          Some say that Howard Hawks was trying to outdo Cecil B. DeMille in big budget films.
          Last edited by Eric7885; 5 January 2022, 01:14 PM. Reason: Spelling

      • Witness For The Prosecution (1957). One of my favourite films of all time. Charles Laughton absolutely superb as Sir Wilfrid Robards the council for the defence backed up by John Williams and Henry Daniell in his team while keeping a watchful eye over Laughton's health is his nurse Elsa Lanchester (Mrs Laughton). The question is has Tyrone Power committed murder and why is Marlene Dietrich behaving so strangely. Torin Thatcher is the formidable prosecuting council, and Ian Wolfe is the assistant who keeps Sir Wilfrid topped up with cigars and brandy. A wonderful film and as stated before Laughton is brilliant.

        Happy New Year to all.

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        • Eric7885
          Eric7885 commented
          Editing a comment
          The best adaptation of an Agatha Christie film. Some years later another version with Dame Diana Rigg was made. It was OK. The original in 1957 was the best.

      • Anyone watched the drama Four Lives on BBC1? (the whole 3 part series is available on iPlayer)

        A look at the aftermath of four murders carried out by Stephen Port between 2014 and 2015.

        Based on true documentation.

        Given there was a break due to covid restrictions while filming it is a real shame they messed up on the locations for the real thing.


        https://www.manchestereveningnews.co...-what-22626233


        https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-r...tect-and-serve
        Last edited by Silver Bullet; 4 January 2022, 02:32 PM.

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        • No Time to Die (2020 copyright year). The much-delayed and lengthy Bond 25 with the conclusion of Daniel Craig's tenure and storyline started in Casino Royale (2006). Craig gets more dialogue than in all his previous Bonds and much of it is angst-driven rather than the traditional black comedy quips. There are of course fantastic locations, amazing stunts and memorable set-pieces plus the expected appearances from M (portraits of earlier incarnations Bernard Lee, Robert Brown and Judi Dench can be briefly spotted in HQ), Q and Miss Moneypenny as well as Felix Leiter. The production design and photography are as stunning as usual and Hans Zimmer's score is heavily dependent on the Bond theme and John Barry's On Her Majesty's Secret Service. However, the film is the biggest departure yet from the established formula and it's difficult to predict where the franchise goes next.
          Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 6 January 2022, 03:15 PM.

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          • narabdela
            narabdela commented
            Editing a comment
            It's refreshing to see a balanced review for a change Gerald. It is indeed difficult to predict where we go from here, but, judging by the usual announcement at the end of the credits, it's definitely going somewhere.

        • Strange that after the credits were shown, it stated that Bond would return. Why not put that caption before the credits? I don’t know many individuals who watch the credits at the end of each film. I usually do. Years ago, very few films would have such a long list of credits. The Bond film, list of credits lasted over 5 minutes.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Eric7885 View Post
            . The Bond film, list of credits lasted over 5 minutes.
            Sadly the film lasted 2hrs 43mins which for many they will never get back!!

            Comment


            • Eric7885
              Eric7885 commented
              Editing a comment
              On all other Bond films, Bond 007 did survie. On thé last film 007 died. So I now wonder is 007 officially dead, and perhaps a new Bond 008 will emerge? Or has the Bond films finally run out. James Bond has been around since about 1964.

            • Nick Dando
              Nick Dando commented
              Editing a comment
              Eric be more careful in future as this comment has caused upset.

          • Should you put spoiler if you reveal the ending of a film?
            I haven’t seen this film yet and if you’re correct you’ve ruined it for me

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            • Eric7885
              Eric7885 commented
              Editing a comment
              Sorry about that. This sort of thing will not happen again.

          • Inanimate (aka Harbinger Down, 2015). Imagine making a film that pays tribute to 'The Thing' and 'Alien', but with a budget of ten times less. Lance Henriksen is the only recognisable name in this story about a crab trawler which fetches up something strange from the ocean floor. You can imagine the rest as mayhem ensues and one by one the crew is killed in novel ways. The creature effects are pretty well done (and they are allegedly 'real' effects not computer graphics) but there's a strange quality to the effects sequences, looking as though they were re-filmed off a monitor. Hard to describe. Still, it was OK and a lot better than some of the hokey junk that is churned out these days.

            Comment


            • Buster (1988)

              After the Great Train Robbery of 1963, Buster Edwards and his wife June, go on the run, eventually ending up in Mexico,
              The idea of a rom com from a major crime, in which the train driver was badly assaulted, was an odd idea and one that didn't sit well with everyone.
              It's too the credit of Phil Collins and Julie Walters, that their performances make this a a more palatable movie.
              But it does leave a sour taste in the mouth.
              With Larry Lamb, Sheila Hancock, Martin Jarvis and Ralph Brown

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              • We Dive At Dawn (Digitally Enhanced 2015 Edition) DVD
                With John Mills as the Capting

                Of course I have seen this 1943 film before but never in such reasonable visual quality - it is actually quite a good film considering it was made during WW2,filmed using 2 built for Turkey Submarines which obviously did not get delivered due to some european war or other,quite enjoyable,the only niggle for me was that during the credits - whoever wrote them got a couple of the Petty Officers Ranks incorrect (sad innit ).

                Comment


                • Cry of the Penguins AKA Mr Forbush and the Penguins (1971)

                  A womanising, boozy, Biologist, becomes a changed man, after being sent to study a colony of penguins in the Antarctic.
                  Effectively two films in one, with three director's and a change of leading lady to boot.
                  It starts as a romantic comedy, with John Hurt's raffish Forbush, trying to impress unimpressed student Hayley Mills, whilst boozing his way around London.
                  The second half of the film, charting Forbush's time in the Antarctic with the penguins is a more sombre affair, totally at odds with the first.
                  None of it really works, but the penguin sequences, shot by documentary film maker Arne Sucksdorff, are a delight.

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