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Watched Last Night

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  • #31

    Tigon Man commented
    28th February 2017, 09:57 PM
    The Eagle Has Landed always leaves a bit of a sour taste for me, when Donald Sutherland's character walks off whistling into the sunset..
    I know what you mean Tigon - but it is a very entertaining film,I had not seen it for years,lovely locations used for the filming.

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    • #32
      The Wind of Change (1961). Pretty ground-breaking "B" from Vernon Sewell dealing with racial bigotry, what they called "the coloured problem". Johnny Briggs leads the gang of bigots with David Hemmings and Bunny May a couple of his followers. It's down to his pop Donald Pleasence and his sister Ann Lynn to represent reason, while Hilda Fenemore, reunited with Donald from Nineteen Eighty-Four, is in her most mumsy role yet. Glyn Houston and Angela Douglas are also in the cast, as is Edna Doré, again featuring in another interesting screenplay from her husband Alexander. Nice night time photography from Basil Emmott.

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      • #33
        Sons of the Sea (1939). A murder mystery at Dartmouth Naval College in eye-watering "Dufaycolor" with "Sole Direction" by Maurice Elvey, so who directed the other fish is the bigger mystery as the identity of the perpetrator of the crime is on the "bleedin' obvious" list. There's a fair dollop of comedy as well as drama, which turns exceedingly mawkish, melodramatic and sentimental at the end, a literal flag-waver for the Royal Navy, though let's remember this was released not long after war broke out. Leslie Banks is the naval captain onto something dastardly German with a very callow Simon Lack as his very callow cadet son and Nigel Stock as one of his pals. Mackenzie Ward and Ian Fleming appear to represent officialdom and Kay Walsh and Kynaston Reeves are locals with telescopes. It's really quite fun with interesting Devonshire locations in colour, though Mr. Elvey's direction of Dover soles and other creatures is exceedingly stagy. The brass band incidental music isn't that subtle either.

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        • #34
          The Rocks of Valpre (1935). Soppy melodrama with the script and performances pretty much on the rocks. Bad blood between French army captains John Garrick and Leslie Perrins (guess which is the romantic hero who suddenly bursts into song and which is the slimy cad who bursts into blackmail) results in the good guy being sent to Devil's Island while his love Winifred Shotter frets and hyperventilates and marries stuffy old Michael Shepley on the rebound. Another epic from Julius Hagen's Real Art Productions and sadly the print and the soundtrack appear to have been dashed upons the rocks too.

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          • #35
            The Sacrfice (2016)

            Pagans are up to no good on a remote Scottish island. Another horror movie for those who have never seen a horror movie. Earnestly acted, nicely photographed and decently paced but adding absolutely nothing that hasn't been seen before. Filmed on location in Scotland and Ireland so some ruggedly beautiful, if chilly, backdrops.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by John Hamilton View Post
              The Sacrfice (2016)

              Pagans are up to no good on a remote Scottish island. Another horror movie for those who have never seen a horror movie. Earnestly acted, nicely photographed and decently paced but adding absolutely nothing that hasn't been seen before. Filmed on location in Scotland and Ireland so some ruggedly beautiful, if chilly, backdrops.
              This sounds interesting John. The Wicker Man obviously springs to mind - any similarities ?

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              • #37
                Originally posted by oddbodjunior View Post

                This sounds interesting John. The Wicker Man obviously springs to mind - any similarities ?
                Yeah, vaguely perhaps, in terms of plot, an outsider finds herself in the midst of a pagan conspiracy, and setting but it's nowhere near as good and actually it's pretty obvious from the outset what is going on. The one that I kept thinking about was Nothing But the Night, just in terms of tone.

                I watched a few films this weekend from 2016, including this one and Shut In , which is a retread of the best bits from The Shinning, and the overwhelming feeling I get is they are aimed at an audience that never watches anything more than a few year short old.

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                • #38
                  Nothing But The Night is an interesting movie. Not great in itself, but with several striking scenes. I still shudder at seeing a ghastly made up 12 year old Gwyneth Strong and her gang about to chuck Christopher Lee on the bonfire. As well as Di Dors in full monstrous mum mode.

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                  • #39
                    Agreed. A movie that almost but doesn't quite work

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                    • #40
                      The Siege of Sidney Street (1960). 1960 Dublin stands in for 1911 London (though with the several Irish accents on the soundtrack, a few extra London establishing shots wouldn't have gone amiss) in an account of the famous siege and the events leading up to it, written by Jimmy Sangster and "Produced Directed and Photographed by Robert S. Baker and Monty Berman". Donald Sinden heads the cast as an undercover detective in a romantic subplot tracing the events of Latvian refugees holding up after a botched series of crimes. Peter Wyngarde leads the miscreants with Kieron Moore the unbalanced one, Leonard Sachs the mature one, Maurice Good the steadfast one, Tutte Lemkow the cowardly one and Nicole Berger and Angela Newman the feminine ones. Mr. Sangster himself appears as Home Secretary Mr. Churchill directing the final events. Solid though unadventurous stuff.

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                      • #41
                        Gerald I remember thinking when I watched Sidney Street last year, that Donald Sinden was a ridiculous choice for an undercover officer. That rumbling voice and upper class mannerisms, he was never going to blend in was he..

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                        • #42
                          Mr. Turner (2014) on Film4
                          A masterpiece by Mike Leigh and Timothy Spall about the later life of J.M.W. Turner. A grunting, surly, randy old man but a brilliant painter

                          Steve

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                          • #43
                            Hello everyone and welcome to my first post!

                            Last night I watched a Boris Karloff double bill - Corridors of Blood (1958) and Grip of the Strangler (1958). I had never seen them before and thought they were very entertaining.

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                            • #44
                              Gert and Daisy Clean Up (1942). Slapstick wartime comedy focusing on tins of pineapples (no, really) with the anarchic G&D behaving like Old Mother Riley with a slightly bigger budget, times two. They do like to mock authority and although their comedy is certainly of its time and somewhat laboured, they both have strong personalities, though look little like their brother Jack Warner. They wage war on their neighbour Iris Vandeleur as well as cause trouble for crooked councillor Joss Ambler while supporting Ralph Michael and Elizabeth Hunt in their obligatory romantic scenes as well as belt out a few corny songs. Another one knocked off by Maclean Rogers in a day or two.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
                                Gerald I remember thinking when I watched Sidney Street last year, that Donald Sinden was a ridiculous choice for an undercover officer. That rumbling voice and upper class mannerisms, he was never going to blend in was he..
                                No doubt it was because Donald put on a flat cap and dirtied up his tweed overcoat that he fooled them all.

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