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  • #46
    Testing my first post just to say I watched Blackbeard The Pirate last night.

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    • #47
      The Entertainer (1960). A terrific cast gives drastic life to the Rice family set around the time of Suez with Laurence Olivier as the crummy seaside performer whose talent, love live and finances are all teetering on collapse with Brenda de Banzie as his downtrodden and betrayed wife, Roger Livesey as his principled but doomed father and Joan Plowright, Alan Bates and, briefly, Albert Finney as his children. All are very good, though the underplaying of Miss Plowright as the loyal daughter is exceptional. Thora Hird is the querulous mother of beauty queen Shirley Anne Field and Daniel Massey plays Joan's boyfriend. John Osborne's play is translated to the screen along with Nigel Kneale and realised at times almost on documentary level by Tony Richardson, with some superb cinematography by Oswald Morris (who, as Ozzie Morris requests "La donna è mobile" on the radio ). Entertaining indeed.

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      • #48
        Recoil (1953). Elizabeth Sellars is the daughter out for revenge when her jeweller father is murdered during a robbery by Kieron Moore and his gang. She works her way into his family home where she falls for his brother played by Edward Underdown but pretends to fancy Kieron as she tries to unmask him as her father's killer. Martin Benson is the nasty gang boss and John Horsley is the Inspector also on the villains trail..Decent shoot out in a warehouse at the end of the film. Produced by Berman & Baker and scripted and directed by John Gilling. I recorded this back in January and felt it was worth the wait to watch it.

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        • #49
          Currently watching "One Summer" from 1983 with David Morrissey.

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          • #50
            The Price of Silence (1959). Which is a couple of packets of Woodbines in Sam Kydd's shop. A starring role for Gordon Jackson as a slightly mature ex-con who changes his name and gets a job at an estate agent office where he fast succeeds and gets romantically involved with June Thorburn where he also fast succeeds. But his boss's temptress of a wife Maya Koumani as well as the blackmailing Mr. Kydd cause strife for Gordon and then a murder occurs and he's in the frame.
            Terence Alexander, Mary Clare and Llewellyn Rees feature in this one, which has Victor Brooks in his usual sighing role as I've-seen-it-all-before copper, but it's swiftly paced and jogged along by Montgomery Tully and although it proclaims to be "An Eternal Production", it only lasts for 73 minutes and a lot happens in them.

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            • #51
              Yellow Canary (1943). Can Anna Neagle be a Nazi agent? An intriguing and quite exciting wartime spy drama set in London, the North Atlantic and Canada with a plot that is almost like Launder and Gilliat with its twists and turns and dashes of humour, although it was written by Miles Malleson and DeWitt Bodeen. Producer/director Herbert Wilcox displays more flair than his usual heavy-handed style and although Dame Anna still has her twee moments, she comes off rather well as the exiled German sympathiser. Richard Greene is the intelligence officer who may be on her trail and Albert Lieven the Polish officer who is very attentive to her. The humour is courtesy of Margaret Rutherford and Claude Bailey. There's a silly sentimental ending, but it's good entertainment getting there.
              Interesting to see this too:

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              Dyalls Junior and Senior have a face-off: Valentine and dad Franklin.



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              • #52
                Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                Yellow Canary (1943). Can Anna Neagle be a Nazi agent? An intriguing and quite exciting wartime spy drama set in London, the North Atlantic and Canada with a plot that is almost like Launder and Gilliat with its twists and turns and dashes of humour, although it was written by Miles Malleson and DeWitt Bodeen. Producer/director Herbert Wilcox displays more flair than his usual heavy-handed style and although Dame Anna still has her twee moments, she comes off rather well as the exiled German sympathiser. Richard Greene is the intelligence officer who may be on her trail and Albert Lieven the Polish officer who is very attentive to her. The humour is courtesy of Margaret Rutherford and Claude Bailey. There's a silly sentimental ending, but it's good entertainment getting there.
                Interesting to see this too:
                I found it a bit confusing. Maybe I wasn't paying it enough attention. But a good film

                Steve

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                • #53
                  Ferry to Hong Kong (1959). A big budget comedy-drama but a big brick for Rank, a film which co-writer and director Lewis Gilbert regarded as a disaster. Curt Jurgens is miscast as the hobo who's legally debarred for landing in Hong Kong or Macau so has to stay on Orson Welles' rickety ferry. Well, Jurgens has a limited supply of charisma (as Tom Baker said once, he did laugh once, but that was before the war) and Wellesndecided to lumber himself with a hellish "English" accent that veers between cockney and Australian. Plus Jurgens and Welles apparently hated one another in real life as well as in the film. But at least Sylvia Syms is always a pleasure to see, but what she sees in Herr Jurgens is quite difficult to comprehend. The original intent to cast Peter Finch in the Jurgens role and possibly Burl Ives in the Welles role would've been quite orientally wise.

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                  • #54
                    Park Plaza 605. (1953)

                    Private Investigator Norman Conquest hits a pigeon with a golf ball & intercepts a message that leads him to get mixed up with a beautiful blonde, diamond smuggling & espionage!
                    Tom Conway, with Eva Bartok, Joy Shelton. Sid James, Richard Wattis, Anton Diffring, Terence Alexander & Michael Balfour.
                    British "B" movie that does have a splendid cast of British & European character actors.
                    I'm a fan of Tom Conway & although at 50 he looks like a man who's smoked too many Lucky strikes & drank too many Martini's he still has great charm & such a beautiful speaking voice!

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                    • #55
                      Up with the Lark (1943). And it's down with the eyelids for an even lower rent Gert and Daisy: Ethel Revnell and Gracie West. They go undercover as landgirls to "help" investigate black marketeers, but although from a story by the talented Val Valentine, there's very little comedy in this comedy. Elongated and big-bummed Ethel warbles a couple of weak music hall songs while unsuccessfully mugging for the camera and it's sometimes difficult to make out what her stooge, the shrunken and big-beaked Gracie, is saying. The presence of well-kent performers like Johnnie Schofield, Ian Fleming and Ivor Barnard helps, but only a bit. An E. J. Fancey "production" flatly directed by Phil Brandon.

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                      • #56
                        The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934) on London Live with Leslie Howard, Merle Oberon & Raymond Massey.

                        Makes for an interesting comparison with P&P's "The Elusive Pimpernel (1950)" which is essentially a remake of the same Pimpernel story.

                        Steve

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                        • Antonylds
                          Antonylds commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I love the scene where Chauvelin comes across Sir Percy (feigning sleep) in the library - Raymond Massey's face is a picture as he entertains, then dismisses, the notion that Sir Percy is the Pimpernel.

                      • #57
                        The Smashing Bird I Used To Know (1969)

                        Sexploiter cum social drama from director Robert Hartford-Davis, with Malteser Madeliene Hinde as the schoolgirl sent to reform school, after stabbing her Mum's lover.
                        Tawdry stuff with a predictable 'road to ruin' storyline and some so-so acting.
                        The plusses being some nice Sussex location work and a fine performance from Maureen Lipman as the reform school bad girl, who belies her initial tough image.
                        With Renee Asherson, Dennis Waterman, Patrick Mower and Derek Fowlds

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                        • #58
                          Anne of the Thousand Days (1969). Hal B. Wallis's sumptuously-costumed production is another go at it, from Maxwell Anderson's play (an Oscar for Margaret Furse, a raspberry for historical accuracy): Richard Burton on paper as Henry is a magnificent notion, on film his outbursts more resemble Shepperton scenery swallowing. Genevieve Bujold is a willowy and feisty Anne and John Colicos is a suitably viperous Thomas Cromwell. However, it has to be said that the finery of British stage and screen, including Michael Hordern, Anthony Quayle, Peter Jeffrey and William Squire, merely go through the motions and although the locations are nicely shown by Arthur Ibbetson and Charles Jarrott, there's little fresh in this. Sympathy rests squarely with Anne Boleyn and as Joan Sims very nearly sewed, Henry is a shit.

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                          • #59
                            Wings of Danger (1952) Very watchable thriller with Zachary Scott as the imported US star name. Good British based cast including a very young Diane Cilento.

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                            • #60
                              Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
                              The Smashing Bird I Used To Know (1969)

                              Sexploiter cum social drama from director Robert Hartford-Davis, with Malteser Madeliene Hinde as the schoolgirl sent to reform school, after stabbing her Mum's lover.
                              Tawdry stuff with a predictable 'road to ruin' storyline and some so-so acting.
                              The plusses being some nice Sussex location work and a fine performance from Maureen Lipman as the reform school bad girl, who belies her initial tough image.
                              With Renee Asherson, Dennis Waterman, Patrick Mower and Derek Fowlds
                              Haven't seen it for years. Seem to remember it promising a lot more than it delivers on the exploitation stakes and I have no recollection of Derek Fowlds in it at all.

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                              • Tigon Man
                                Tigon Man commented
                                Editing a comment
                                With it's scenes of sexual assault and nudity it may have seemed risqué in 1969 John, but now sadly it looks very mild.
                                Derek Fowlds appears in the last quarter of the film as an interior designer and Dennis Waterman's employer, who takes an unhealthy interest Ms Hinde's when she dosses down at his shop.
                                What struck me watching this again, was the quality of the actors appearing in this dross. Still everyone's got to earn a living..
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