Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

Watched Last Night

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Upstairs and Downstairs (1959). There's no sign of Mr. Hudson or Mrs. Bridges, but plenty of domestics strife as newly-weds Richard and Kate struggle to engage a suitable live-in home help. The episodes that follow amusingly show the different disasters that befall them, usually concluded by a visit from the question-taking local bobby on the beat. When they do find an apparently perfect candidate in the beautiful Ingrid, the disasters that then occur tend to be of the romantic type.
    A mild comedy from Rank in Eastman Color from the Betty Box/Ralph Thomas team that is very much in the Doctor vein; indeed, it appears Dirk Bogarde was the original choice to play Richard, but I think Michael Craig who does play him is fine in the role. Anne Heywood plays his missus with James Robertson Justice, more reasonable and not as bellowing as usual, is her father with Sid James as the policeman and Mylène Demongeot as Ingrid. The scrapes they all get into are ridiculous, but entertaining enough, and the cast, also including Reginald Beckwith, Cyril Chamberlain, Irene Handl, William Mervyn and Nicholas Parsons, are all up for it. The other home help disasters are Claudia Cardinale (who has a penchant for American sailors), a dubbed Joseph Tomelty and Nora Nicholson (who have a penchant for robbing banks) and Jessie Robins, but the stand-outs as ever are Joan Hickson as the sozzled Rosemary and Joan Sims as nervous Welsh lass Blodwen.

    Comment


    • Born of the Sea (1949). A strange 40 minute short filmed in Coverack, Cornwall with no professional actors except for the narration which jumps around from Frank Phillips to Howard Douglas. A baby is rescued from a wreck by the lifeboat crew, nobody can find out who he is, but he grows up in the village and then, as a member of the lifeboat, has to rush out to sea again. The abrupt ending is a shame as the scenes of the boy growing up are quite charming and provide an interesting record of the lives of Cornish fishermen of the time.

      Comment


      • How To Refuel Your Two-Stroke Odd 15-minute item on Talking Pictures in the "Glimpses" series, featuring Charles Hawtrey in a non-speaking part. Appears to be a "public information" film from the 1940s giving advice to users of two-stroke engines, but becomes an advert for Shell and the new kind of ready-mixed fuel available at its petrol stations. No other information given. Repeated on Sunday 7th at 15.45.

        Comment


        • 84 Charing Cross Road (1986). Based on true events, the gentle tale of a 20 year long-distance "romance" between brash New York writer Helene Hanff (Anne Bancroft) and reserved London bookseller Frank Doal (Anthony Hopkins) who never meet. The film is both amusing and wistful and Bancroft and Hopkins have a great rapport but of course don't share a scene. The episodic nature of the story is initially disjointing, but it quickly becomes the fabric of the film, and the meeting of minds despite the totally contrasting personalities and different lifestyles is fascinating. Things turn slightly more theatrical towards the end with increasing speeches to camera but by then you are drawn into the story. There are also pleasing recreations of 40s, 50s and 60s New York and London. Of the rest of the cast, Judi Dench plays Frank's wife and Maurice Denham puts in a wonderful performance as the elderly print expert George.

          Comment


          • True as a Turtle (1957). The flimsiest mystery plot barely supports the series of disasters which befalls newly-weds John Gregson and June Thorburn when they spend most of their honeymoon on Turtle, Cecil Parker's leaky boat, on a trip to France and back. Director Wendy Toye gleefully records the nautical nonsense which also has on board Keith Michell and Elvi Hale (13 years before they cross horns in THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII), Avice Landone and the boy Michael (E.) Briant, who forsook acting, joined the BBC, became an AFM, a production assistant and then a very capable television director with a real life love of boating, despite all the calamities he encounters here. Mildly amusing rather than hilarious.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Judge Foozle View Post
              How To Refuel Your Two-Stroke Odd 15-minute item on Talking Pictures in the "Glimpses" series, featuring Charles Hawtrey in a non-speaking part. Appears to be a "public information" film from the 1940s giving advice to users of two-stroke engines, but becomes an advert for Shell and the new kind of ready-mixed fuel available at its petrol stations. No other information given. Repeated on Sunday 7th at 15.45.


              A cute short but I always get the feeling Bill Shine was trying to replace beloved Mr Pastry when I see him even in the same film like Something in the City. Enjoyable non the less.

              Watched the Blu-ray Goose Steps Out which recently replaced my aged Betamax tape, hats off to them for piecing it back together although some off it looks like a dupe print.

              Comment


              • Passage to Marseille (1944)
                Follows the story of some escapers from a French penal colony who want to fight for la belle france.Much of the cast is from Casablanca and includes Humphrey Gocart,Sidney Greenteeth and Peter Lorre.
                Bogey sleepwalks through the film and generally looks like he does not want to be there - not too bad a film overall and worth watching for the comical 'special effects' using model B17 bombers but there is also footage of some real B17's too.We had not realised there would be so much Air Force content in this film although of course the Free French Air Force never operated the B17.

                Comment


                • Monsieur Ripois (1954) Well, this was my second foreign language film in two weeks and thankfully my schoolboy French is better than my non-existent Spanish.

                  Though I was more than a little confounded why three of England’s most fascinating stars appeared in such servile supporting roles. Was there an alternate English-language version?

                  It seems Gérard Philipe was ‘l’homme au go-go’ at the time and he’s onscreen constantly playing the sex-pest hero.

                  First there’s Margaret Johnston (who's usually wonderfully fierce in her roles) playing the employer-cuckold. Secondly, Joan Greenwood who’s often ethereal but here quite earthy indeed (similarly ‘earthy’ as Oswald Morris’ clean photography showing London’s dirty side; and ‘earthy’ reminding me of that Hitchcock anecdote to Truffaut about him watching the French peasant slut from the moving train near Boulogne).

                  Thirdly, and in contrast to Joan, is Valerie Hobson as the immaculately-gowned accommodating wife to the philanderer. She is as regal as always in her requisite ten costume changes but this small film is a sad farewell as she gracefully withdrew from the limelight.

                  Comment


                  • Eight Days A Week. My second viewing of Ron Howard's film of The Beatles in their prime with lots of concert footage of John, Paul, George and Ringo belting through She Loves You, Twist and Shout, Roll Over Beethoven, I Saw Her Standing There and more.

                    Beatlemania as it was back in the sixties with lots of interviews shot on their American tours and loads of footage of various concerts from all over the world.

                    A must for fans of the four lads who took the sixties by storm.

                    Comment


                    • THE LOVE MATCH 1955. A film we regularly watch with Morecambe born Thora Hird in top form along with Danny Ross a favourite of mine, also went to have a wander around his Blackpool home a bit ago which was interesting. A great loss to entertainment and so young.

                      Comment


                      • The Best Years of Our Lives

                        (1946)
                        Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Dana Andrews, Teresa Wright, Virginia Mayo, Harold Russell - finally got round to watching this multi award winning film about three WW2 veterans returning home after the war - superbly acted and directed - great film

                        Comment


                        • Blow Up (1966)

                          I had not seen this film for many years and it is as I remembered it,the directors homage to the swinging 60's in London,a hugely enjoyable film to watch,especially the scenes where one is taken through London streets as if seated in the back of Hemmings Roller ragtop ,of course one has to cope with watching quite a few scantily clad young models - some of which are not anorexic.This film could have been so much better and there were lots of opportunities for a better storyline - but as I said - still a hugely enjoyable film to watch.A bonus near the end is to see the Yardbirds in their prime with a young Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck on guitars.

                          Comment


                          • PASSPORT TO PIMLICO Love to watch this if only to see Richard Hearne on his bike.

                            DEMOBBED 1944 Mancunian Film gem capturing some variety greats including Dan Young the master of Dude Comedy. One day I will find out where his final resting place is.

                            Comment


                            • The Informers (1963). Nigel Patrick is the detective who relies on underworld informants to help solve his cases much against the will of his boss Harry Andrews. When one of his snouts is murdered after trying to give information about a bank robbery Nigel is soon hot of the trail of the killers which gets him in trouble with his boss and leads to him being framed and jailed. Alan Cuthbertson is his fellow detective always trying to get one over on him. Derren Nesbitt is the flash front man of the gang but not the boss, Margaret Whiting is his put upon muse. Lots of familiar faces including Frank Finlay Roy \Kinnear, George Sewell, Colin Blakely and Kenneth J Warren. If you look closely you'll even see Garfield Morgan. Location shots (in black and white) included Hampstead Pond and Golders Green with a glimpse of The Hippodrome as well as lots in the West End. Directed by Ken Annakin. I loved it.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by cassidy View Post
                                The Informers (1963). Nigel Patrick is the detective who relies on underworld informants to help solve his cases much against the will of his boss Harry Andrews. When one of his snouts is murdered after trying to give information about a bank robbery Nigel is soon hot of the trail of the killers which gets him in trouble with his boss and leads to him being framed and jailed. Alan Cuthbertson is his fellow detective always trying to get one over on him. Derren Nesbitt is the flash front man of the gang but not the boss, Margaret Whiting is his put upon muse. Lots of familiar faces including Frank Finlay Roy \Kinnear, George Sewell, Colin Blakely and Kenneth J Warren. If you look closely you'll even see Garfield Morgan. Location shots (in black and white) included Hampstead Pond and Golders Green with a glimpse of The Hippodrome as well as lots in the West End. Directed by Ken Annakin. I loved it.

                                Yes a really gritty crime thriller, marred slightly by the crappy fight scene at the end with Nigel Patrick and...the crime boss

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X