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Watched Last Night

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  • #61
    The Hills of Donegal (1947). Singer Dinah Sheridan inherits an Irish castle and apparently loads of Euros so rotter John Bentley marries her, while trying to fend off matronly creditor Tamara Desni. The castle is an old ruin, though it might contain a hidden treasure, albeit bedevilled by an old gypsy curse . . .
    A load of old codswallop spun out with operatic and gypsy campfire sequences served up by John Argyle, but it's strangely enjoyable with those Temples Sheridan and Bentley doing their melodramatic stuff, plus we get Maire O'Neill as the miserable old housekeeper, Irene Handl with one of her tiny performing dogs, Moore Marriott doing an Oirish variation of his toothless old coot performance and, unfortunately Brendan Clegg as an obnoxious riverdancing brat. James Etherington plays the singing and, ahem, mature alternate love interest and Robert "Bob" Arden pretends to be a Romany. Worth a look for a giggle at the ambitious but POTTY TIME style model work.

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    • #62

      Countess Dracula (1970)

      Nothing to do with Dracula of course, just a nod to publicity for Hammer, Ingrid Pitt is the Countess (Based presumably on Elizabeth Bathory) bathing in the blood of the local virgins, to retain her youth.
      Despite being handsomely shot with Hammers usual attention to detail and with two fine performances from a dubbed Ingrid Pitt and a massive Nigel Green, this late Hammer is generally rather dull and lacking in any real excitement.
      One or two arresting visuals though, including the finale, when the Countess begins to quickly age as she repeats her marriage vows to dashing young Hussar Sandor Eles.
      With Maurice Denham, Peter Jeffrey, Patience Collier and Lesley Anne-Down.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Lee View Post
        Hello everyone and welcome to my first post!

        Last night I watched a Boris Karloff double bill - Corridors of Blood (1958) and Grip of the Strangler (1958). I had never seen them before and thought they were very entertaining.
        I love Grip Of The Strangler. Memories of seeing it at The Gaisford Kentish Town after seeing it advertised in What's on In London.

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        • #64
          Carrington VC (1954). Stiff upper lip drama with David Niven as the officer who has taken money from the army safe and trying to show that he was justified in doing so in a Court Martial. Margaret Leighton is his fragile wife and Noel Middleton is the Captain who is in love with him. Alan Cuthbertson is his particularly nasty superior officer. Raymond Francis,Geoffrey Keen, Maurice Denham among others in court but for me Victor Maddern is the top scene stealer. Directed by Anthony Asquith. Loved it.

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          • #65
            Saturday Island 1951

            After a shipwreck a young marine & an older nurse find refuge on a deserted Island. Trouble ensues when a plane crashes & the nurse tends to the injured pilot.
            Linda Darnell, Tab Hunter (in his first film) & Donald Gray are the three marooned on the Island. British character actors John Laurie, Sam Kydd & Peter Butterworth pop up early in the film.
            Linda Darnell looks astonishingly gorgeous in this. Tab Hunter is almost as good looking as Linda although he sounds like a thirteen year old with his whiny voice!
            Beautiful locations & the beautiful Miss Darnell make this a very easy film to watch!

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            • #66
              Out west for the marvellous Seven Men From Now (1956) which begat the great partnership of Randolph Scott and \Bud Boetticher with Burt Kennedy writing the screenplay. (Harry Joe Brown came later). Randolph Scott is the sheriff who blames himself for the death of his wife in a robbery and sets out to track down both the proceeds of the robbery and the seven men involved. He finds himself falling for Gail Russell along the way and meets up again with old adversary Lee Marvin who gives a superbly chilling performance as a cold blooded killer.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by cassidy View Post
                Out west for the marvellous Seven Men From Now (1956) which begat the great partnership of Randolph Scott and \Bud Boetticher with Burt Kennedy writing the screenplay. (Harry Joe Brown came later). Randolph Scott is the sheriff who blames himself for the death of his wife in a robbery and sets out to track down both the proceeds of the robbery and the seven men involved. He finds himself falling for Gail Russell along the way and meets up again with old adversary Lee Marvin who gives a superbly chilling performance as a cold blooded killer.
                Watched this a few weeks ago as part of a Marvin mini fest, along with The Killers and The Big Red One. Great performance from a charismatic actor

                Comment


                • cassidy
                  cassidy commented
                  Editing a comment
                  According to Phil Hardy's Western Encyclopedia The Wild Bunch (1969) was based on an original idea from Lee Marvin.

                • John Hamilton
                  John Hamilton commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I am not sure that's true. I have read bios of both Marvin and Peckinpah and I don't remember reading that, it's sounds like a significant detail. I know Marvin was involved early in the development, though

                • Toscana
                  Toscana commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I read in a bio (can't recall whose) that Marvin was happy to sign on The Wild Bunch but pulled out to earn his first million dollar pay cheque on Paint Your Wagon.

              • #68
                Laurel And Hardy - Our Relations

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                • #69
                  Frightmare (1974)

                  Home counties horror in Haselmere!
                  Director Pete Walker and chief screenwriter David McGillivray at their naughtiest, with this tale of a couple of a couple released into the community after spending 15 years in an asylum for a series of gruesome murders.
                  Not surprisingly, shortly after a series of cannibalistic murders commences.
                  Pete and David turn their baleful gaze on the psychiatric profession in perhaps the best of Pete Walker's giallo type horrors. Helped by a brilliant lead performance from Sheila Keith as the insane Ma Yates and matched by an equally impressive turn from Rupert Davies as her devoted husband.
                  With Kim Butcher, Paul Greenwood and Deborah Fairfax.
                  Perhaps best not viewed on a full stomach..

                  Comment


                  • John Hamilton
                    John Hamilton commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Agree this all of that...except the strong stomach bit. The subject is quite repellent but actually there is very little that would shock any horror fan. Much less gruesome than Texas Chainsaw Massacre or Satan's Slave, both (near) contemporaries.

                    Any definately worth watching if only for Shelia Keith!

                • #70
                  She Knows Y'Know (1961). Those expecting the Hylda Baker of NEAREST AND DEAREST will be disappointed as, although she is straining against the leash, Hylda is restrained in this northern comedy/drama about one-upmanship, pomposity and possibly illegitimate offspring. Her BSc son owns up to be the father of the bun that the local goodtime girl has in the oven, but family pride, a lodger and sheer stupidity are also factors to take into consideration. Cyril Smith plays Hylda's nightshift husband, Joe Gibbons her lodger (called Charlie Todger, for heaven's sake) and Peter Myers her academic but clueless son, while Neil Wilson and Joan Sanderson are the stiff-backed parents of the pregnant Linda Castle and Alfred Burke is their grasping lawyer. There's a substantial role for Lucy Griffiths as the equally grasping neighbour, but sadly it shows her limitations as an actress in anything but cameo appearances. Another one dashed off over a weekend by Montgomery Tully.

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                  • #71
                    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                    She Knows Y'Know (1961). Those expecting the Hylda Baker of NEAREST AND DEAREST will be disappointed as, although she is straining against the leash, Hylda is restrained in this northern comedy/drama about one-upmanship, pomposity and possibly illegitimate offspring. Her BSc son owns up to be the father of the bun that the local goodtime girl has in the oven, but family pride, a lodger and sheer stupidity are also factors to take into consideration. Cyril Smith plays Hylda's nightshift husband, Joe Gibbons her lodger (called Charlie Todger, for heaven's sake) and Peter Myers her academic but clueless son, while Neil Wilson and Joan Sanderson are the stiff-backed parents of the pregnant Linda Castle and Alfred Burke is their grasping lawyer. There's a substantial role for Lucy Griffiths as the equally grasping neighbour, but sadly it shows her limitations as an actress in anything but cameo appearances. Another one dashed off over a weekend by Montgomery Tully.
                    I absolutely love this film, I have watched the dvd about half a dozen times, one of those films you can watch over again.

                    Comment


                    • #72
                      Dr No (1962)

                      The first but not the best of the Bond's and the film that made a superstar out of Sean Connery.

                      Plenty of iconic scenes, from the opening at Les Ambassadeurs with Connery's immortal 'The namesss Bond, James Bond' complete with droopy fag in mouth, to Ursula Andress and that bikini.

                      A splendid villian from Joseph Wiseman and John Barry and Monty Berman's legendary music.

                      A must for all shecret shervice fans..

                      Comment


                      • #73
                        The Wooden Horse (1950)

                        The other escape from Stalag Luft 3! Also based on a true story, this is the opposite end of the scale to The Great Escape, only one, shorter, tunnel, half the running time, only three escapers (but all three made it home). Jack Lee keeps things moving commendably swiftly and in the end it doesn't really matter that the acting is as wooden as the horse (as might be expected from Leo Genn and Anthony Steel). David Tomlinson looks lost in a dramatic role, while Brian Forbes contributes one of his early supporting turns.

                        Comment


                        • #74
                          Originally posted by Odeonman View Post
                          The Wooden Horse (1950)

                          The other escape from Stalag Luft 3! Also based on a true story, this is the opposite end of the scale to The Great Escape, only one, shorter, tunnel, half the running time, only three escapers (but all three made it home). Jack Lee keeps things moving commendably swiftly and in the end it doesn't really matter that the acting is as wooden as the horse (as might be expected from Leo Genn and Anthony Steel). David Tomlinson looks lost in a dramatic role, while Brian Forbes contributes one of his early supporting turns.
                          I think it was this film for which the services of actor Peter Butterworth were declined as "he looked the wrong type", despite the fact that P.O.W. Peter Butterworth had been there at the time!

                          Comment


                          • #75
                            Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

                            I think it was this film for which the services of actor Peter Butterworth were declined as "he looked the wrong type", despite the fact that P.O.W. Peter Butterworth had been there at the time!
                            It was, although Peter acted as an advisor on the film.

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