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Watched Last Night

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  • Floods of Fear (1958). Another film to make use of the newly installed Pinewood water tank facility (see also Sea Fury,
    A Night to Remember ...) ...

    Anne Heywood is superb in this film...She looks and acts great.....Far from the 'Violet Pretty' (real name) former beauty queen
    Rank starlet image !

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
      The Dark Man (1950)

      Big Maxwell Reed is the titular character. A shadowy double murderer, who tracks down sole witness Natasha Parry's rep actress. Cue gentlemanly Detective Edward Underdown to the rescue.
      Rather formulaic thriller from writer director Jeffrey Dell. Reed is a massive presence, but his acting is a bit stiff and he doesn't get many lines, Underdown and Parry are effective though and there's support from Barbara Murray and William Hartnell.
      Some good scenes amongst the dross though, including the final chase across Camber Sands.
      I also watched this; Edward Underdown always seemed pretty stiff to me as well, and he certainly is here, despite becoming Natasha's romantic interest. The brooding Mr. Reed is quite enterprising as the murderer, with his massive eyebrows and a waistcoat that appears and disappears between shots, while William Hartnell shows his lighter touch and skill at comedy with his retorts as the frustrated superintendent. There are also nice, and generally traffic-free, shots of Hastings standing in for "Walsham Bay". If Harry Fowler, Oscar Quitak and Gordon Bell appeared as the screen-credited reporters, however, I never saw them.

      Comment


      • HMS Defiant (1962) Brilliant seafaring yarn directed by the late great Lewis Gilbert. Alec Guiness as the captain who wants to keep a happy ship and Dirk Bogarde as the scheming sadistic second in command who believes in a flogging for the slightest excuse and makes Capt Bligh look like a friendly uncle as he victimises Sir Alec's midshipman son. Anthony Quayle is the leader of a group of mutineers who want better conditions which includes Murray Melvin, Tom Bell and Victor Maddern among others. Joy Shelton (Mrs Sidney Tafler) makes an early appearance as Sir Alec's wife. Good sea battles in a screenplay by Nigel Kneale and Edmund North . My second Lewis Gilbert sea story of the day as I had watched Sink The Bismark (1960) earlier. Another Lewis Gilbert great.

        Comment


        • Rooney (1958). Ever since the success of Genevieve in 1953, Rank tried to build up John Gregson as a comedy star, but personally I always found him a bit awkward in those and preferred him in dramatic roles. In this good-natured slice of Irish whimsy based on a novel by Catherine Cookson (), he plays the Dublin dustman of the title who the ladies always fall for, yet he resists their advances. When he moves into the O'Flynn household, things take a turn for the worse as far as he's concerned as it's full of women, except for the ailing old grandfather upstairs. How will Rooney's romantic and sporting life - he's a master at hurling - pan out? The O'Flynns are snooty June Thornurn, gentle Maureen Toal and wicked witch of the west Maire Kean, with Barry Fitzgerald as the twinkly grandfather. The cuckoo in the nest is dowdy interloper cousin Maire, but she's played by Muriel Pavlow! The usual Irish suspects are all present and correct, including John's chums on the (remarkably clean) bin van Noel Purcell, Jack MacGowran, Eddie Byrne and Philip O'Flynn. An easy going piece of nonsense.

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          • Meet Me Tonight (1952). Three twee and totally inconsequential stories from Noël Coward's "Tonight at 8.30"; if this was an attempt to continue the Somerset Maugham portmanteau type of film, it fails completely. In the first, "Red Peppers", we see tired old theatre act Ted Ray and Kay Walsh singing, dancing and arguing. In the second, "Fumed Oak", we see Stanley Holloway ditching his trio of harpies at home. In the third, "Ways and Means", wasters Valerie Hobson and Nigel Patrick try to work out how to scrounge money to keep up their lazy lifestyle. Only the last is in any way mildly amusing but the whole thing seems totally empty and pointless to me.

            Comment


            • The Flying Scot (1957)

              A hapless crook enlists a more experienced felon to help him rob the Flying Scotsman of withdrawn banknotes.

              Typical fifties British thick ear but with two Canadian leads in Lee Patterson & Kay Callard & an American in Alan Gifford.

              The cast also includes a young John Lee & Kerry Jordan who is probably best known as the Regiment cook in "Zulu".
              Last edited by wadsy; 5th March 2018, 06:17 AM.

              Comment


              • The Betrayed (1957). An unoriginal idea - a blind man trying to track down a criminal by his voice - is given a few interesting tweaks by Brian Clemens and Eldon Howard in this "B". However, it's plodding Philip Friend who is the sightless Canadian former POW whose attempt to escape a wartime prison camp with four others was thwarted by the traitor. The film is also hampered by it being an all-expenses spared Danziger production, flatly directed by Ernest Morris. Philip Saville rivals his namesake Friend in the charisma stakes as the betrayer, while Diana Decker clacks around the film as the model who "helps" our hero. Peter Bathurst and Frank Sieman are the boneheads from Scotland Yard in this one and for once Harold Lang is out-camped by Ferdy Mayne who plays the ultra-fey dress designer Freddie. Not one to watch on a regular basis I would suggest.
                The copyright declaration for Danziger Photoplays is given as 1947, but I believe the film was shot one afternoon in 1957.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                  The Betrayed (1957). An unoriginal idea - a blind man trying to track down a criminal by his voice - is given a few interesting tweaks by Brian Clemens and Eldon Howard in this "B". However, it's plodding Philip Friend who is the sightless Canadian former POW whose attempt to escape a wartime prison camp with four others was thwarted by the traitor. The film is also hampered by it being an all-expenses spared Danziger production, flatly directed by Ernest Morris. Philip Saville rivals his namesake Friend in the charisma stakes as the betrayer, while Diana Decker clacks around the film as the model who "helps" our hero. Peter Bathurst and Frank Sieman are the boneheads from Scotland Yard in this one and for once Harold Lang is out-camped by Ferdy Mayne who plays the ultra-fey dress designer Freddie. Not one to watch on a regular basis I would suggest.
                  The copyright declaration for Danziger Photoplays is given as 1947, but I believe the film was shot one afternoon in 1957.
                  This is The Betrayal - and yes, produced one afternoon in 1957 !.

                  Comment


                  • Up Pompeii (1970)

                    Frankie Howerd delivers more TPG (Titters per gallon) then just about any other comedian. Even watching this Tolly Rothwell scripted Carry On style romp for the umpteenth occasion, this time with my girlfriend, it still makes me laugh.
                    The cast is sublime. Bill Fraser, Lance Percival, Barbara Murray, Michael Hordern, Julie Ege, bring home the corn.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by oddbodjunior View Post

                      This is The Betrayal - and yes, produced one afternoon in 1957 !.
                      Yes, quite right, oddbod, The Betrayal.

                      Comment


                      • The Rake's Progress (1945). Hogarthian-like drawings start off this cleverly-constructed and delicious black comedy from Launder and Gilliat about carefree playboy Vivian Kenway who goes from crisis to crisis, totally unconcerned and usually penniless: sent down from Oxford, doing down his employer, doing his friend's wife, fighting in a shop lift, a marriage of convenience and drunk driving with a tragic outcome are just some of the antics he gets up to. Rex Harrison is ideal casting as the bounder Vivian, a tricky role inasmuch as he has to make a pretty despicable character the likeable hero of the story, and he deftly negotiates the scrapes and jauntily delivers the witty lines. His real wife Lilli Palmer joins him for a couple of adventures, plus there's Margaret Johnston as the girl who truly loves him, Griffith Jones and Jean Kent as the couple he respectively cuckolds and beds, Godfrey Tearle his long-suffering but loving father and Guy Middleton as his best what-ho chum. Vivian's "harum scarum, but with the right stuff in him" according to his father, as events eventually contrive to show us.

                        Comment


                        • Collateral-BBC Anyone watch this 4 parter?

                          I found it pretty good.

                          Now I am onto Requiem

                          Comment


                          • Unusually I watched all 4 programmes of a mini series and was very impressed. Like all well judged dramas that involve the plight of refugees / traffickers/ law and order agencies / criminals and the people who get caught in between it all rang true. The escape of the ex-Army big fish at the end, leaving a trail of victims and casually destroyed lives in his wake was all too believable. It reminded me of the similarly plotted conclusion to The French Connection.

                            Comment


                            • The Black Tent (1955). For all his popularity in the 50s, I've generally found Anthony Steel an uninteresting and stolid actor. Here he goes blond and larks around in the Libyan desert, but he's no Lawrence and the script, despite being rewritten by the talented Bryan Forbes, is utterly tedious and exceptionally dull. Perhaps aware of those shortcomings, director Brian Desmond Hurst chooses to linger on the admittedly-stunning landscapes and he is particularly keen on showing us just about every angle of the Roman ruins at Sabratha. However, the whole thing is so slow, mainly told in desperately languid flashbacks, that you could easily leave the thing running and go out for a long walk only to discover on your return nothing has happened.
                              Donald Sinden plays Steel's brother who travels from England to try to find him, goodness knows why, Anna Maria Sandri the girl Steel marries and André Morell her dad, Sheik Salem ben Yussef. Other browning-up is courtesy of Donald Pleasence and Michael Craig () and Anton Diffring and Frederick Jaeger do their usual Nazi party pieces.
                              In his autobiography, Forbes recalls an initial frost between him and the director and he was naturally more interested in just having married Nanette Newman, and while Forbes' own cameo was deleted, Nanette does dub Miss Sandri.

                              Comment


                              • The Man Between (1953). What is generally considered to be Carol Reed's follow-up to The Third Man sees young and naïve Susanne Mallison arrive in post-war Berlin to visit her army doctor brother and his German wife. Although passing between East and West Berlin is not yet walled, it is still tricky with distrust, espionage and high tensions aplenty, and what is the mystery which surrounds Susanne's sister-in-law and the formidable Ivo Kern?
                                The film generally follows Susanne's point-of-view and Claire Bloom plays her as a bit of an airhead, albeit a flighty one, with Hildegard(e) (K)nef(f) as sister-in-law Bettina and Geoffrey Toone as brother Martin. James Mason is the mysterious Ivo, the man between east and west, whose motives are never altogether clear. Mason once described the German accent he adopted for The Desert Rats as "crummy". Well, he speaks with a crummy accent here too.
                                While not hitting the highs of its predecessor, this thriller is slow to build but is still gripping in its latter chase scenes and Reed and his cinematographer Desmond Dickinson certainly make the most of boldly-lit, skew-angled night time scenes in the ruins of Berlin.

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