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  • Love Among The Ruins (1975) TV Movie

    Late flowering love for septuagenarian Barrister Laurence Olivier as he defends stage actress Katherine Hepburn against a charge of breach of promise.
    Hepburn favourite George Cukor directs this one and despite the wordy script, doesn't allow it to become to sickly or sentimental.
    Both Olivier and Hepburn are in great form and there's a good cast of British support actors.
    With Colin Blakley, Richard Pearson, Joan Sims and Leigh Lawson.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Seaton View Post

      Saw this at the cinema. I agree with Paxton Milk completely. It's like all of Tim Burton's films: on paper, it looks as if it's made for me, then in reality it's a disappointment. I haven't seen any that have completely delivered on their dark-comic-pop-culture promise. AND he was the first to put black make-up round Batman's eyes! Unforgivable!
      I think that Johnny Depp is wearing the same makeup in this one! The best of his movies, for me, was Sleepy Hollow but again it looks/sounds better on paper or stills than it turned out to be on the screen

      Comment


      • Journey's End (2017)

        i watched the original play many years ago and found it moving and disturbing. This version seems to run faithfully, as far as I can remember to the play, and manages to be worthy and decent without adding anything new. The intervening years has seen a lot of light shone into the subject, the horrors of the trenches, the indifference and stupidity of senior staff and the pointless waste of human life, so there wasn't really anything to begained by saying if all again. Nice performances, particularly from Paul Bettany, but it all seemed a bit superficial, you know, middle ranks all proper gents and the men were the salt of the earth.

        Comment


        • The Medusa Touch (1978)

          Horribly dated, poor special effects, one of the lead actors (Lino Ventura) dubbed... not great but watchable hokum

          Last edited by Nick Dando; 13th June 2018, 01:23 PM.

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          • Tigon Man
            Tigon Man commented
            Editing a comment
            A favourite of mine The Medusa Touch. I love the collapsing Cathedral with it's polystyrene bricks and the vintage car with a mind of it's own.

        • Divorce His; Divorce Hers (1973) TV Movie

          A US/UK co production, shot largely in Rome and at a studio in Munich
          Richard Burton as a Jet Set business man and Elizabeth Taylor as his party going Missus, tell their part of the divorce story split into two parts.
          They have three annoying children. Drippy hippy Mark Colleano, shrieking Rosalyn Landor and clingy Eva Griffith.
          As bad as the title suggests, a bore from start to finish, with Burton looking comatose and a tubby Taylor wheeling herself from party to party.
          Only Barry Foster comes out of it with any dignity intact as Burton's business partner.

          Comment


          • I watched Elvis. The Searcher. On Sky Atlantic which is a documentary that is a real treat for Elvis fans. Part 1 was last night and Part 2 tonight but it is available on Catch Up. Lots of new stuff about The King and if you are an Elvis fan it is unmissable.

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            • Brief Encounter (1974) TV Movie

              The remake with Richard Burton and Sophia Loren as the would be lovers.
              Not actually that bad, even if the impossibly glamorous Ms Loren working for The Citizens Advice Bureau in Winchester, is a mighty leap of the imagination.
              With Jack Hedley as the nice but dull husband, John Le Mesurier as Burton's drunken Doctor friend, and a very fine performance from Rosemary Leach as a depressive client of Ms Loren at the CAB.
              Probably the first and last film where you will see Sophia Loren and Fred Wood in the same scene. A real beauty and the beast moment!

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              • The Odessa File (1974). Solid Frederick Forsyth thriller about Nazi revival in 1960s Germany directed by Ronald Neame. Jon Voight plays a journalist who doggedly and elaborately investigates the Odessa organisation which secretes former S.S. men in society. His motivation for doing so is not apparent at first . . .
                Mary Tamm plays Jon's girlfriend and Maximilian Schell his prime former S.S. target and there are appearances from Derek Jacobi, Peter Jeffrey and Noel Willman as well as a brief role for Max's sister Maria playing Jon's mother.
                There's an off-kilter mishmash of a score by Andrew Lloyd Webber, but evocative German and Austrian locations effectively shot by Oswald Morris. It's quite a slow-burn, but stick with it as there are a few gripping sequences, particularly the fight in the printing building.

                Comment


                • After so many people recommended me, Godfather, I finally watched it. Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, this mob drama, based on Mario Puzo's novel of the same name, focuses on the powerful Italian-American crime family of Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando). When the don's youngest son, Michael (Al Pacino), reluctantly joins the Mafia, he becomes involved in the inevitable cycle of violence and betrayal. Although Michael tries to maintain a normal relationship with his wife, Kay (Diane Keaton), he is drawn deeper into the family business.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by alexkevin View Post
                    After so many people recommended me, Godfather, I finally watched it. Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, this mob drama, based on Mario Puzo's novel of the same name, focuses on the powerful Italian-American crime family of Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando). When the don's youngest son, Michael (Al Pacino), reluctantly joins the Mafia, he becomes involved in the inevitable cycle of violence and betrayal. Although Michael tries to maintain a normal relationship with his wife, Kay (Diane Keaton), he is drawn deeper into the family business.
                    Try and get the box set which shows some scenes which are in the book but not in the film, for example when after the wedding Vito takes his sons and Johnny Fontaine to visit the dying Genco Abbondando in hospital.

                    Comment


                    • Bronson (2008)

                      An early entry into Tom Hardy's gallery of brutal psychotics. Playing Britain's most violent prisoner, the actor gives a disturbingly convincing performance in a true(ish) biopic that certainly isn't for the squeamish. Anyone offended by bodily fluids, copious swearing and profanity, and unrelenting, bloody violence probably needs to give it a miss. If you can make it through all that, you will also find some moments of genuine humour.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by zabadak View Post
                        The Medusa Touch (1978)

                        Horribly dated, poor special effects, one of the lead actors (Lino Ventura) dubbed... not great but watchable hokum

                        Dated? I suppose any film that is 40 years old can probably be similarly appraised, but I remember this film with some affection. Richard Burton was impressively sinister in the lead role and I just like the building sense of dread as all attempts to halt his mania for death and destruction fall by the wayside. I thought the Cathedral scenes were dramatic enough!

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Edward G View Post

                          Dated? I suppose any film that is 40 years old can probably be similarly appraised, but I remember this film with some affection. Richard Burton was impressively sinister in the lead role and I just like the building sense of dread as all attempts to halt his mania for death and destruction fall by the wayside. I thought the Cathedral scenes were dramatic enough!
                          It's a film I enjoy too - one of the last ones I saw in the cinema when, having come in late and missed the beginning, you could stay into the next performance. Great music by Michael J. Lewis as well.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

                            It's a film I enjoy too - one of the last ones I saw in the cinema when, having come in late and missed the beginning, you could stay into the next performance. Great music by Michael J. Lewis as well.
                            Full of great scenes, especially Burton's Barrister's wonderfully nihilistic diatribe about Grandads war medals, Burton shouting at the suicidal neighbour through the wall. The end scene where he opens his eyes and writes THAT word, still makes my flesh creep...
                            You're right Gerald, Michael J. Lewis contributes one of his best scores.

                            Comment


                            • Dual Alibi (1947). Herbert Lom's back under the Big Top, but this time he's the man in the flying trapeze, in fact there's two of him. When twin trapeze team Jules et Georges are cheated out of a big French lottery win by crooked publicist Terence de Marney and kid-on moll Phyllis Dixey, they devise an ingenious way to get their revenge.
                              A downbeat thriller, almost a noir, set in France and, er, Blackpool, with effective trick photography when the twins are seen together, but routinely directed by Alfred Travers. Indeed, the film is mighty slow in its first and second acts and is again guilty of pointing the camera at the circus acts for far too long. Messrs. Lom however are as good as you would expect as the brothers and cleverly plays them with subtle differences. The rest of the cast can't match him at all.
                              Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 15th June 2018, 07:31 PM.

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