Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

Watched Last Night

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by cassidy View Post

    Try and get the box set which shows some scenes which are in the book but not in the film, for example when after the wedding Vito takes his sons and Johnny Fontaine to visit the dying Genco Abbondando in hospital.
    Okay I will get the box set!!

    Comment


    • Ring-A-Ding Rhythm! (1962), the American alias of It's Trad, Dad! Pretty horrible titles for the first film of Amicus Productions, which promptly started making horror films. The plot, such as it is, involves Helen Shapiro and Craig Douglas trying to recruit besuited DJs Alan Freeman, David Jacobs and Alan Freeman to have jazz artists perform in their killjoy town. It's all put on pause literally 27 times to feature mostly forgettable numbers, made worse by the sound going out of sync about 20 minutes in, but at least we get to see the likes of Mr. Acker Bilk, Kenny Ball, Chubby Checker, Del Shannon and John Leyton mash their stuff, albeit puffing on their ciggies as they play their instruments and between verses. Directed by the enterprising Richard (Dick) Lester, already in semi-psychedelic mode.

      Comment


      • Burke &Hare (2010)

        John Landis' reinterprets Edinburgh's real-life story of murderous bodysnatchers as a romantic comedy. It's mildly amusing rather than funny haha and there some nice in jokes, turns from such reliable scenes stealers as Simon Pegg, Ronnie Corbett and Tim Curry, and an atmospheric recreation of the city. On the whole, though, it doesn't add up to the sum of its parts.

        Comment


        • agutterfan
          agutterfan commented
          Editing a comment
          And Jenny Agutter (a long term friend of Landis) as a particularly bad actress at an audition.

      • Desperate Moment (1952). Well, there are about 88 desperate minutes in this, another of those Dirk Bogarde on the run flicks, this one particularly plodding and badly-structured, and director Compton Bennett and cinematographer Pennington Richards make poor and casual use of the location work in the postwar ruins of Berlin. Dirk has confessed to a murder he did not commit, and when he finds out the true motives of the real killer who tricked him, he (easily) escapes from prison and seeks out the scoundrel. Mai Zetterling is the girlfriend who tries to aid him, Philip Friend the agent who tries to catch him and Albert Lieven the villain of the piece. Episodic and really quite boring.

        Comment


        • Rock You Sinners (1957). If these kind of films usually have little plot, this one has really no plot at all and is more or less a string of little-known rock and roll performers over-performing forgettable songs. From the E. J. Fancey stable, which means a home movie look to it all and makes Danziger Productions look like huge budget epics. Philip Gilbert is the radio DJ who is trying to sell a TV rock and roll idea while having romantic problems with the inevitable Adrienne Scott (aka Fancey). I'm afraid the only artiste I'd heard of before is Tony Crombie. Dire, man.

          Comment


          • Dad's Army (1971)

            Captain Mainwaring's bumbling platoon of supernnuated misfits make their original jump to the big screen and inevitably some of the cosy charm of the much loved TV series is sacrificed in the process. However, don't panic! don't panic! - all of the sublime regular cast are present and correct - with the exception of Janet Davies' Mrs Pike, here played instead by the sassy Liz Fraser. We get a potted account of the Home Guard's formation followed by an episodic string of typically homespun calamities featuring runaway bathtubs, exploding barns and wayward steamrollers. One or two laugh out loud moments; although these are generated more by our fond familiarity with the characters than anything else. Somehow, Walmington-On-Sea's finest redeem themselves in the end, when their mettle is tested in a funny but surprisingly tense showdown with crash landed Nazi pilots. Shambolic they may be, but you'll find yourself rooting for our heroes when the chips are down and their courage and resourcefulness rise to the challenge. A nice, feelgood helping of gentle mirth laced with pride over how everyone really did try to do their bit in our darkest hour.
            Last edited by Tonch; 14th July 2018, 06:55 PM.

            Comment


            • Behind the Headlines (1956). Unassuming and utterly routine crime reporter "B" with few surprises: it's so off the peg that the mystery of the murderer's identity is no mystery at all. Paul Carpenter and Adrienne Corri are the reporters investigating the case with Hazel Court and Alfie Bass joining in later, while the sole visible representative of law and order is Superintendent Ewen Solon, presumably suffering budget cuts as he's got no sidekick to boss around. Magda Miller is the sassy bumped-off blonde and it's interesting to see Adrienne and Hazel joined by fellow Hammer lady Melissa Stribling, as well as station sergeant stalwarts Arthur Rigby (DIXON OF DOCK GREEN) and Leonard Williams (Z CARS) in the same film. Although Miss Corri's and Miss Court's Suits and Coats from M. and S. Harr Ltd. get a screen credit, a co-starring credit should have been given to Paul's tweed overcoat which he either puts on or takes off in just about ever other scene.

              Comment


              • Outland 1981

                high noon in space .Sean Connery lifts this a notch or two . Think its made at a UK studio .
                Last edited by AlecLeamas; 17th July 2018, 03:58 PM.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by AlecLeamas View Post
                  Outland 1981

                  high noon in space .Sean Connery lifts this a notch or two . Think its made at a UK studio .
                  Yes, I think it was Pinewood.

                  Comment


                  • The Last Man to Hang (1956). Stiff Tom Conway is in danger of becoming a stiff when he is put on trial for the murder of his wife Elizabeth Sellers. A preposterous crime thriller efficiently directed by Terence Fisher but which is overacted by just about everyone with the notable exceptions of Freda Jackson in a dry run for Fisher's The Brides of Dracula as a devoted housekeeper and Mr. Conway himself, who I always enjoy watching, but he plays every part the same. There's quite a nice roll of character actors in the court (Raymond Huntley, Walter Hudd and David Horne) and on the jury (Victor Maddern, Anthony Newley, Harold Goodwin, Bill Shine etc.) plus appearances from the recently departed Eunice Gayson and Gillian Lynne. Much of the storyline is in flashback or in cutaways to the individual domestic problems of several of the jurors which colour their verdict with Maddern a kind of stand-in for Henry Fonda from 12 Angry Men and if you don't think about the plotline too hard, it's a enjoyable piece of entertainment.

                    Comment


                    • The Watcher in the Woods (1980)

                      Cutesy American family rent a Ye Olde English country mansion in the wilds of Gerrards Cross, complete with crotchety former owner Bette Davis living next door.
                      Which is a cue for all manner of squeaks, bumps in the night and thunderstorms as the older daughter Lynn-Holly Johnson is seemingly haunted by Bette's missing daughter.
                      A sort of Disney meets Midsomer Murders, this is one of several versions that were shot and runs less than 80 minutes.
                      Not badly done, although the Watcher itself is never really explained.
                      With David McCallum, Carroll Baker, Ian Bannen, Richard Pasco and Frances Cuka.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by AlecLeamas View Post
                        Outland 1981

                        high noon in space .Sean Connery lifts this a notch or two . Think its made at a UK studio .
                        It's a great example of star power saving a film, Connery basically carries the movie and makes it into something watchable.

                        Comment


                        • The Whole Truth (1958). Silly but entertaining enough thriller set in a St. Paul near Nice that looks like medieval Florence, as the Walton Studios sets look strangely like those they used in SWORD OF FREEDOM. Film producer Max Paulton finds himself accused of the murder of his tempestuous leading lady Gina Bertini with whom he previously had an affair. Into the mix appears the strange Mr. Carliss who tells Max of the murder before it has occurred . . .
                          Stewart Granger puts in his standard flippant performance as Max and Donna Reed is pretty anonymous as the wife Max doesn't want to know about his affair, but George Sanders is rather good as Carliss and it's all put together nicely by director John Guillermin, albeit with a minimum of genuine Riviera location work, although I'm not sure the jazzy score played by Johnny Dankworth and His Orchestra works that well.
                          Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 19th July 2018, 08:39 PM.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X