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Watched Last Night

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  • Originally posted by AlecLeamas View Post
    Thers a girl in my soup 1970

    im sure many of us watched this on tptv . Hoping that we had discovered a rare gem . Not im afraid .
    Starts encouragingly with pretty english girls and almost a softcore approach then swaps them for fawning over goldie hawn and thats when it goes off cock . Im glad this one never passed my radar b4 pity it strayed into my path last night .
    It strayed into my path too. A dated, but well enough made adaptation by the Boulting Brothers from Terence Frisby's very popular play, TV "personality" Robert Danvers is a one-night stand creep who meets his match in cookie Marion. His career fading at this point, Peter Sellers certainly inhabits the womanising world of the narcissistic Danvers and girl of the moment Goldie Hawn is chirpy enough as Marion, but the whole is rather distasteful when viewed with today's attitudes. Solid support comes from Tony Britton as Danvers' sole friend, while John Comer and Diana Dors are the Greek chorus. However, Danvers' chat-up line "my God, but you're lovely" is not really the way to describe this.

    Comment


    • Eye in the Sky (2015) on Film 4 last night.

      Starring Dame Helen Mirren & Alan Rickman as British military people running a UK/US operation to take out some terrorists in Kenya. It all gets hung up by various politicians on either side of the pond. But is all resolved to their satisfaction (although not to the satisfaction of some civilians caught up in the events)

      Dame Helen is always worth watching
      Even when the story isn’t a great one

      Steve

      Comment


      • Originally posted by narabdela View Post
        Duel in The Sun: King Vidor's steamy oater from 1946 (a.k.a. "Lust in The Dust"). A surprisingly clean technicolor print for TUTV, though rather a 'soft' image.

        Hadn't seen this it over fifty years. They don't make 'em like this anymore.
        Great theme music!

        Comment


        • Originally posted by zabadak View Post

          Great theme music!
          An Oscar winner for the rarely understating Dimitri Tiomkin. When asked how a Russian was so adept at writing music for westerns, he apparently replied, "A steppe is a steppe is a steppe . . .".

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Tonch View Post

            The October Man (1947)

            Always had a soft spot for this gripping little film noir; an excellent directorial debut from Roy Ward Baker with the shadowy influence of Hitchcock pervading throughout. Sterling lead performance from John Mills as a confused man recovering from a head injury who becomes chief suspect in the hunt for the murderer of lonely model Kay Walsh. Centred around the hotel where Mills is staying (on the edge of the fog shrouded Common where Walsh meets her fate) the other residents include gossipy Joyce Carey, twittering George Benson and a rather sinister and self-assured Edward Chapman - you'll never shudder at Norman Wisdom's bumbling Mr Grimsdale so much as you do here! Strong performances across the whole cast with solid support from sleazy Jack Melford, avuncular Felix Aylmer, unswervingly devoted sweetheart Joan Greenwood and dogged detective Frederick Piper, plus an amusing little cameo from garage mechanic James Hayter towards the end. Mills himself is outstanding as he veers between self-doubting, suicidal anguish and resourceful, steely resolve. A fine British post war psychological thriller.
            Thanks for that, Tonch; your excellent review inspired me to watch the film which indeed boasts a fine performance from John Mills. Written and produced by Eric Ambler, I thought the film's pacing was a bit odd as things only really get going in the last act, and looking at Roy Ward Baker's autobiography, that seems to have bothered him too, along with the intransigence of Denham's camera and sound departments, and Mills only gives it passing reference in his autobiography, but the result is superior stuff nevertheless.

            Comment


            • Psyche 59 (1964)

              The wife of an Industrialist (Patricia Neal), suffering from psychosomatic blindness after a fall, gradually begins to remember what caused the accident.
              Weird, Po faced not very palatable histrionics, with the camera forever picking out and lingering on a particular object, be it a photo or a flower, to remind us that this is symbolic.
              Curt Jurgens is his usual stiff self as the husband, with Samantha Eggar as the sexy younger sister.
              With Ian Bannen and Beatrix Lehmann.

              Comment


              • Surprise Package (1960). The main surprise of this package is how well the unexpected trio of Yul Brynner, Mitzi Gaynor and Noel Coward amusingly interact. Yul is in machine gun dialogue James Cagney mode as a deported mobster, Mitzi his dumb blonde and Noel a deposed king, all holed up on a small Greek island. Various factions are after Yul's supposed money, Mitzi's apparent virtue and Noel's actual crown and producer/director Stanley Donen does well in keeping the mood fast, witty (though perhaps a bit too wordy) and fun. Familiar faces such as Eric Pohlmann as the corrupt chief of police, Warren Mitchell as the island's resident thief and George Coulouris and Guy Deghy as rival interested parties join in and it's just a shame Christopher Challis's crisp location photography on Rhodes wasn't shot in colour.

                Comment


                • The Boy With the Topknot (2017) shown on BBC2
                  A tale of a Sikh chap who has done his degree & is living in London, but is now trying to reconcile his family in Wolverhampton with the fact that he is living with, and wants to marry, a blonde, white woman.
                  Complicated by lots of family secrets in his extended Sikh family

                  But very good

                  Steve

                  Comment


                  • Whisky Galore! (1949) on BBC2 this afternoon

                    A fun Ealing romp set in the Western Isles of Scotland.
                    I’m sure you all know the story, but it still works well

                    Steve

                    Comment


                    • agutterfan
                      agutterfan commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Great film which I have on DVD. Always reminds me of ex-Britmovie member Captain Waggett. I wonder what became of him/her?

                  • We Joined the Navy (1962). An Eastmancolor-ful comedy briskly directed by Wendy Toye.
                    Royal Navy Lieutenant Commander Badger is known as the Artful Bodger due to his constantly putting his foot in it, or rather, opening his mouth when he shouldn't, but with a flare for talking himself and others out of considerable messes. After being posted hither and thither, Bodger collects three twerpish midshipmen at Dartmouth, the short-fused Bowles, the nerdy Carson and the womanising Dewberry and they are all sent to serve on an American flagship under the beady eyes and loud mouth of Admiral Ryan where they get into all kinds of scrapes. When they sail to rescue an American citizen when a revolution engulfs the banana republic of Moronia, can Bodger and his trio of naval nincompoops save the day . . . ?
                    Kenneth More appears rather too mature to play Bodger and, well, sails through his performance, but Dinsdale Landen, Derek Fowlds and Jeremy Lloyd enter into the spirit of things as the midshipmen, as does Lloyd Nolan as the roaring admiral. Joan O'Brien has relatively little to do as Kenny's love interest, though there's a nice sprinkling of familiar faces throughout, including Laurence Naismith, Walter Fitzgerald, John Phillips and Andrew Cruickshank as admirals in an ascending scale of ferocity, and an amusing appearance of Esma Cannon as a foreign consul's bird-like wife spouting pidgin English. Oh, and curiously for a rival studio (ABPC instead of Rank), a cameo from Dirk Bogarde as Dr. Simon Sparrow.
                    Interestingly, in the trailer, Admiral Nolan refers to his pet dog's rear end as an "ass", but in the film itself, he's shouting "arse"!

                    Comment


                    • Odeonman
                      Odeonman commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Interesting that producer (Danny Angel), director and star were all refugees from Rank. This was pretty much Kenneth More's last starring role after being, effectively, sacked by Rank after heckling John Davis at an industry function. Bogarde's cameo is all the more surprising as by that stage of his career he was most unwilling to play the role for Rank, though he was more or less forced to make Doctor In Distress the following year.

                  • The Black Hand Gang (1930). Virtually plotless, an unamusing series of slapstick comedy sketches from Wee Georgie Wood, a Jimmy Clitheroe forerunner, leading a gang of ragamuffins through a sedate tea party and then on to capture a scarface villain. Sub-Our Gang material, statically directed by Monty Bonks and clumsily performed by all.

                    Comment


                    • 'We Joined the Navy' is based on a novel by the author with the pen name of John Winton (his real name was John Pratt), which I read years ago. It was followed up by a sequel, We Saw the Sea, and possibly a number of others. The Artful Bodger was just one character in the book, which actually was about trainee navel officers. After the second one, I gave up, since I suspect like a lot of 'humorous' novels, the humour was rather of its day, and a bit laboured (and I think a cadet drowned at one point, so not exactly funny all the time). I can see why they took the title, a character, and the vague outline of the books premise, and did something else instead.

                      Saw Passport to Pimlico on Amazon Prime the other night - a slightly ropey copy, but still a delight (my son was slightly outraged that I should chose to watch a B & W film!). I suddenly started to see a surprising number of parallels to Brexit....

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                        'We Joined the Navy' is based on a novel by the author with the pen name of John Winton (his real name was John Pratt), which I read years ago. It was followed up by a sequel, We Saw the Sea, and possibly a number of others. The Artful Bodger was just one character in the book, which actually was about trainee navel officers. After the second one, I gave up, since I suspect like a lot of 'humorous' novels, the humour was rather of its day, and a bit laboured (and I think a cadet drowned at one point, so not exactly funny all the time). I can see why they took the title, a character, and the vague outline of the books premise, and did something else instead.
                        I read them all soon after they came out, and loved them all

                        Mind you, I nearly signed up for RN officer training at Dartmouth

                        Steve

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                          '
                          Saw Passport to Pimlico on Amazon Prime the other night - a slightly ropey copy, but still a delight (my son was slightly outraged that I should chose to watch a B & W film!). I suddenly started to see a surprising number of parallels to Brexit....
                          Shame on your son. There are some great B&W film. Many are better than many of the modern colour films.

                          It’s the story and the performances (& the cinematography and the design and other things) that are a lot more important than the presence or absence of colour

                          Steve

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                            Shame on your son. There are some great B&W film. Many are better than many of the modern colour films.

                            It’s the story and the performances (& the cinematography and the design and other things) that are a lot more important than the presence or absence of colour

                            Steve
                            It's a generational thing. I have three kids and none of them would go out of their way to watch a black and white film. It's not just the photography, though, the style of storytelling is very different to what they are used to.

                            Comment


                            • Bonekicker
                              Bonekicker commented
                              Editing a comment
                              He is eleven...although he did reckon today that Temple of Doom is the best Indie film, so perhaps it's not just his age!

                              His older sister, on the other hand, has really enjoyed the first two episodes of Mark Kermode's 'Secrets of Cinema's, including the bit about Rafiffi. I have just bought Kind hearts and Coronets on Blu Ray, which is a rather dark and 'sick film, when you think about it, and she rather liked The Happiest Day of Your Life, so perhaps there is hope.
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