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Watched Last Night

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  • Last Night Of The Proms 2018
    With the welcome return of conductor Sir Andrew Davies, the 2018 "last night" might have been expected to be retrospective and nostalgic, but it was far from that.
    Starting with a rousing marche militaire from Hindemith, the programme had a military flavour to mark the centenary of WW1 ending in 1918. This included several of the "good old" communal songs like Keep The Home Fires Burning, Keep Right On To The End Of The Road and Tipperary, when it was still OK to include the line "...everyone was gay..."
    The regional venues played more of a role than usual, but back in the Royal Albert Hall, the chocolate-smooth voice of the Canadian Gerald Finley held the audience spellbound with some great solos and the traditional rendition of Rule Britannia. The sensational 19-year old saxophonist Jess Gillam gave some virtuouso performances as a preamble to what will be a world-beating career.
    And so the 2018 BBC Proms season ended as usual with a mini-fest of British eccentricty, displayed in the traditional way and with the same old melodies.
    This season has emphasised the international qualities of music and has deliberately featured as much work as possible by female composers.
    Next year's programme begins on July 19th, when the 125th Promenade Concerts season gets under way.

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    • Originally posted by peter cucumber View Post
      Last Night Of The Proms 2018
      Great stuff, as always. I never miss The Last Night

      Steve

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      • Whoever was selling the EU flags & hats certainly made a killing

        Steve

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        • You mean you weren't watching the England match!

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          • Originally posted by peter cucumber View Post
            Last Night Of The Proms 2018
            With the welcome return of conductor Sir Andrew Davies, the 2018 "last night" might have been expected to be retrospective and nostalgic, but it was far from that.
            Starting with a rousing marche militaire from Hindemith, the programme had a military flavour to mark the centenary of WW1 ending in 1918. This included several of the "good old" communal songs like Keep The Home Fires Burning, Keep Right On To The End Of The Road and Tipperary, when it was still OK to include the line "...everyone was gay..."
            The regional venues played more of a role than usual, but back in the Royal Albert Hall, the chocolate-smooth voice of the Canadian Gerald Finley held the audience spellbound with some great solos and the traditional rendition of Rule Britannia. The sensational 19-year old saxophonist Jess Gillam gave some virtuouso performances as a preamble to what will be a world-beating career.
            And so the 2018 BBC Proms season ended as usual with a mini-fest of British eccentricty, displayed in the traditional way and with the same old melodies.
            This season has emphasised the international qualities of music and has deliberately featured as much work as possible by female composers.
            Next year's programme begins on July 19th, when the 125th Promenade Concerts season gets under way.
            I particularly enjoyed the "sea shanty"section which included Tom Bowling which we used to sing in school at morning assembly. A great programme.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by orpheum View Post
              You mean you weren't watching the England match!
              The cricket was preferable to the football !

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              • Me and My Pal (1939). Not Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, but Scottish music hall comedian Dave Willis in the second of his two features and straight man George Moon, later a well-known character actor. It's very much rough and tumble corn embellishing a silly plot about insurance scams and prison life - how Dave and George escape from theirs is nowhere as ingenious as in Two Way Stretch - plus numerous songs. Pat Kirkwood is the female lead and sings a few herself, sadly out of time with the musical backing. Arthur Margetson, John Warwick, Aubrey Mallalieu, Ian Fleming and O. B. Clarence are other familiar faces of the day in this, and probably the best bit is the insurance agents and bed routine involving Dave and George with Eliot Makeham and Ernest Butcher.

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                • I have just gotten round to watching The Last Man To Hang 1956.There was great excitement here at its showing.However I found it to be truly awful.How can you get a housekeeper rather than a spouse to identify a body.Isn't it a coincidence that the dead woman would have had a drug overdose of the same drug in the same quantity.

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                  • Postman's Knock (1961). A disappointing comedy which fails to deliver many laughs. A vehicle for Spike Milligan, it's more designed for the likes of Charlie Drake or, gulp, Norman Wisdom, with an innocent country bumpkin posted to a Royal Mail sorting office in London where he is confounded by the metropolis and quickly becomes entangled with a gang of crooks. The script gives little opportunity for Spike's oddball persona and director Robert Lynn doesn't manage to rein in the other actors to the right pitch and as a result Barbara Shelley seems embarrassed and awkward, police inspector Archie Duncan mugs all over the place and Warren Mitchell, Arthur Mullard, John Bennett and Lance Percival as the main robbers come over very poorly: even madcap Bob Todd is subdued. Probably the best is Miles Malleson as the bumbling psychiatrist (called a psychologist in the film) who only gets one scene. Sadly very much second class postage.

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                    • Idol of Paris (1948) - Very high production quality as befits one of the first films made a M-G-M British in Borehamwood. Some huge sets, crowds of extras in period costumes. Just like 'The Wicked Lady' one has to accept it for what it is and enjoy the ride. There is a stand-out performance from Miles Malleson as a befuddled and well intentioned Offenbach. Beryl Baxter bewitches with her huge dark eyes throughout. Peter Jones pops up a waiter. Christine Norden is the villain of the piece, but takes nastiness too far and comes across far too cold and unlikeable. I'm very happy to have watched this.

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                      • Lucky to Me (1939). It's not that lucky to anyone to see this daft bit of fluff by and starring Stanley Lupino as a clerk who has to keep his marriage secret and sinks deeper and deeper into trouble when he and his wife are forced to stay the weekend with some rich clients. Getting into the wrong bed and getting into drag inevitably follow. You know this will be an odd film when David Hutcheson is the singing and romantic male lead. Barbara Blair, Phyllis Brooks and Antoinette Cellier are the ladies and the other gents are Bruce Seton, Geoffrey Sumner and Gene Sheldon with songs by Noel Gay.

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                        • Walter the Sleuth (1926). An amusing Chaplinesque silent short starring, written and directed by Walter Forde. The plot involving foiling a gang of jewel crooks and winning the girl is of course sheer silliness, but of more interest is the London suburbia in which the film was shot (street signs, maybe fake, show Clarence Road, Atkins Road and Park Hill) as well as an inventive chase sequence in which Walter believes he is being followed by a villain, shot in "real time" from a speeding car.

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                          • The Tamarind Seed (1974). Mills and Boon meets John Le CarrĂ© when Julie Andrews meets Omar Sharif in this leisurely-paced mixture of soppy romance and spy intrigue. Lingeringly directed in Barbados, Paris and London by her husband Blake Edwards, who also wrote the script, fairy-like Julie is really quite miscast and delivers her lines in a clipped and shrill way; what Omar sees in her, it's difficult to work out. Sylvia Syms fairly out-acts her as the wife of a suspicious diplomat played by Dan O'Herlihy, while Oscar Homolka is all twinkle and eyebrows as the Russian general. Best of all is Anthony Quayle as a blunt British spymaster. It's all wrapped up with a simpering John Barry score that sadly just adds to the longueur.
                            At one point, Bryan Marshall is seen watching a film on television, and ironically it's a far more enjoyable spy thriller, Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent.
                            Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 19th September 2018, 09:00 PM.

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                            • 11 Harrowhouse (1974)

                              stars James Grodin , Candice Bergen , James Mason .
                              An english set diamond hiest movie not as exciting as it sounds . Stylish in noir sense . nice shots of england circa '74 but yet one thinks could have been better .
                              Last edited by AlecLeamas; 23rd September 2018, 03:03 PM.

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                              • I Thank You (1941). Knockabout corn from Gainsborough with Arthur Askey and Richard "Stinker" Murdoch supported by Moore Marriott and Graham Moffatt in Harbottle and Albert mode, written by Marriott Edgar and Val Guest and directed by Marcel Varnel. There's a number of forgettable songs, a daft plot about trying to raise money for a show which somehow involves posing as servants, with Arthur in drag, and probably the best bit, Felix Aylmer chatting up some show girls and getting smashed. No doubt it amused the wartime audiences, with one of the songs having a dig at Hitler.

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