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  • They Were Sisters (1945). And there were three of them: reliable Lucy, flighty Vera and weak Charlotte. Lucy (Phyllis Calvert) marries for love with Peter Murray Hill, Vera (Anne Crawford) for convenience with Barry Livesey and Charlotte (Dulcie Gray) unwisely, as she plumps for the cruel and merciless Geoffrey played by the cruel and merciless James Mason. There's a good dollop of overwrought upper middle class melodrama in this Gainsborough Picture as well as some squawking children and a cute dog, but it's served up with considerable skill by writer Roland Pertwee, who also appears as a doctor at one point, and director Arthur Crabtree, whose crew appears reflected in a car at another. Pamela Kellino plays James Mason's elder daughter and there's a whiff of incest in their relationship, made somewhat intertextual as in real life They Were Spouses, as indeed were Miss Calvert and Mr. Murray-Hill.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 6th October 2018, 08:27 PM.

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    • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
      White Cargo (1973). White slave trade "comedy" starring David Jason as meek and mild Albert, who fantasises about being a suave and invincible secret agent and then gets involved with a fey and crooked club owner and his heavies, kidnapped girls and the sultry Imogen Hassall, while dogged by two bumbling bowlered civil servants Hugh Lloyd and Tim Barrett. While it's mainly children's TV humour with some double entendres, there are a kernels of inventiveness in some of the slapstick and repartee and there's rather more slickness of production than is usual for something from the Fancey stable.
      I admire your stamina. I started it out of loyalty to David Jason but abandoned the effort before the halfway mark, I thought it just awful.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

        I admire your stamina. I started it out of loyalty to David Jason but abandoned the effort before the halfway mark, I thought it just awful.
        I wouldn't be as benevolent. It's 1970's tosh of the very highest order.

        Comment


        • Jazz Boat (1959). Crime comedy/drama with some songs thrown in as well as a strange teenage yearn for Ted Heath and his Music. Crooks and supposed crooks get involved in a jewel robbery and they end up aboard the title vessel heading for the glamorous destination of Margate. Anthony Newley plays the electrician the crooks think is classy burglar The Cat with James Booth, Al Mulock, David Lodge and even Bernie Winters as the gang who want in on the deal. Anne Aubrey plays The Doll and Joyce Blair is Anthony's girlfriend (Lionel can be spotted too, hogging the camera at one point). Lionel Jeffries portrays a very different kind of police detective from his role in The Wrong Arm of the Law and there's an interesting chase sequence near the end at Dreamland Amusement Park.

          Comment


          • Rough Cut (1980)

            Maybe not rough, but not exactly a smooth crime caper from Donald Siegal.
            Burt Reynolds is the London based playboy jewel thief who with police informer Lesley Anne Down, plans a Hatton Garden diamond heist.
            David Niven playing the oldest and most certainly best dressed Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard aims to stop their plans.
            It's all a bit pedestrian with little chemistry between the leads. Familiar faces including Patrick Magee, Andrew Ray, and Joss Ackland, help with what little sparkle there is.

            Comment


            • Cash On Demand (1961), a rare non-horror Hammer outing for Peter Cushing. Never seen it before, but as a fan of Cushing it was on my to-watch list, and I finally got round to seeing it because of those nice people at Talking Pictures (I know we complain about their blurring images but what other TV channel shows old British movies like this?). Thoroughly enjoyed it. No spoilers (in case someone hasn't seen it) but this is an excellent thriller, basically a two hander between Peter Cushing and André Morell, both of them excellent in their roles, particularly Cushing in what could have been a thankless part as the unlikeable bank manager whose authoritarian streak is undermined and becomes weak, emotional, even cowardly by Morell, clearly relishing his part. Although the action takes place almost entirely in a bank, as it's based on a TV play, the film doesn't seen stagey. The writers & director wisely resist the urge to 'open up' the setting, realising it's not necessary and that a film with only a few sets can be cinematic and tense (think of films set on submarines). Though director Quentin Lawrence, who paces the film really well, can't resist stretching one moment (the 'thirty seconds') longer than in real time, which I think was rightly judged.

              The supporting cast is good, Richard Vernon unusually playing a lower class character than is his wont, and they convince you that their bank staff have known and worked together for sometime. Apart from one tense moment of high drama there didn't seem to be any incidental music, which adds rather than detracts from the spareness of the drama, though I liked Wilfred Joseph's opening score.

              The only fault could be how they created 'the telephone call', and this could have weakened the ending. Given the great detail Morell's character knew about the bank staff and the manager's life, however, I got the impression the Morell character could also be metaphoric, the Christmas setting and the emotional denouement reminding me of A Christmas Carol, with Cushing's bank manager being Scrooge, reminded of the humanity of his bank staff, and Morell as a sort of Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present & Future all rolled into one, so I'll let that fault go as it's otherwise an unassuming small picture that is much better than many of its contemporaries and really deserves to be known better. Also Talking Pictures had managed to get hold of a really good print (though oddly in 4:3 ratio which they stretched) so if you haven't seen it keep a watch out for it. A great 89 minutes of entertainment.


              Last edited by agutterfan; 8th October 2018, 08:21 AM.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                Jazz Boat (1959). Crime comedy/drama with some songs thrown in as well as a strange teenage yearn for Ted Heath and his Music. Crooks and supposed crooks get involved in a jewel robbery and they end up aboard the title vessel heading for the glamorous destination of Margate. Anthony Newley plays the electrician the crooks think is classy burglar The Cat with James Booth, Al Mulock, David Lodge and even Bernie Winters as the gang who want in on the deal. Anne Aubrey plays The Doll and Joyce Blair is Anthony's girlfriend (Lionel can be spotted too, hogging the camera at one point). Lionel Jeffries portrays a very different kind of police detective from his role in The Wrong Arm of the Law and there's an interesting chase sequence near the end at Dreamland Amusement Park.
                Looking forward to seeing this, particularly as one of my colleagues from the local gym tells me he had a part as an extra in a barge when Anthony Newley sings one of his songs (my friend told me that he was actually walking along miming rather than singing). He was paid the princely sum of £16 for five days work which back in 1959 was a weeks wages.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by agutterfan View Post
                  Cash On Demand (1961), a rare non-horror Hammer outing for Peter Cushing. Never seen it before, but as a fan of Cushing it was on my to-watch list, and I finally got round to seeing it because of those nice people at Talking Pictures (I know we complain about their blurring images but what other TV channel shows old British movies like this?). Thoroughly enjoyed it. No spoilers (in case someone hasn't seen it) but this is an excellent thriller, basically a two hander between Peter Cushing and André Morell, both of them excellent in their roles, particularly Cushing in what could have been a thankless part as the unlikeable bank manager whose authoritarian streak is undermined and becomes weak, emotional, even cowardly by Morell, clearly relishing his part. Although the action takes place almost entirely in a bank, as it's based on a TV play, the film doesn't seen stagey. The writers & director wisely resist the urge to 'open up' the setting, realising it's not necessary and that a film with only a few sets can be cinematic and tense (think of films set on submarines). Though director Quentin Lawrence, who paces the film really well, can't resist stretching one moment (the 'thirty seconds') longer than in real time, which I think was rightly judged.

                  The supporting cast is good, Richard Vernon unusually playing a lower class character than is his wont, and they convince you that their bank staff have known and worked together for sometime. Apart from one tense moment of high drama there didn't seem to be any incidental music, which adds rather than detracts from the spareness of the drama, though I liked Wilfred Joseph's opening score.

                  The only fault could be how they created 'the telephone call', and this could have weakened the ending. Given the great detail Morell's character knew about the bank staff and the manager's life, however, I got the impression the Morell character could also be metaphoric, the Christmas setting and the emotional denouement reminding me of A Christmas Carol, with Cushing's bank manager being Scrooge, reminded of the humanity of his bank staff, and Morell as a sort of Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present & Future all rolled into one, so I'll let that fault go as it's otherwise an unassuming small picture that is much better than many of its contemporaries and really deserves to be known better. Also Talking Pictures had managed to get hold of a really good print (though oddly in 4:3 ratio which they stretched) so if you haven't seen it keep a watch out for it. A great 89 minutes of entertainment.

                  Indeed a good little film, but not thought much of at the time as it sat on the shelf for two years before going out on the Rank circuit in December 1963 as supporting film to Bye Bye Birdie. I'm not bothered about Talking Pictures' presentation of it as I have the excellent Sony US DVD in the correct aspect ratio.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

                    Indeed a good little film, but not thought much of at the time as it sat on the shelf for two years before going out on the Rank circuit in December 1963 as supporting film to Bye Bye Birdie. I'm not bothered about Talking Pictures' presentation of it as I have the excellent Sony US DVD in the correct aspect ratio.
                    I think that TPTV however showed Jazz Boat in near enough its correct aspect ratio.

                    Comment


                    • Helter Skelter (1949). Rich girl Carol Marsh has hiccups and attempts to cure her take her to a haunted house in the country, to Jimmy Edwards' psychiatry couch and through various radio broadcasts at BBC Broadcasting House. A surreal and quite bizarre madcap comedy from director Ralph Thomas featuring cameos from numerous personalities then considered as radio performers, including Terry-Thomas, Jon Pertwee and Harry Secombe. Peter Hammond and Geoffrey Sumner are the nitwits out to woo Carol, but when Mr. Pastry's cupid bow twangs, it's daffy mummy's boy David Tomlinson she falls for. He plays the big radio star "Nick Martin Special Investigator" . . .
                      Other familiar faces include Mervyn Johns (with Glynis popping up briefly as the mermaid from Miranda), Judith Furse, Colin Gordon, Richard Wattis, Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne, Dennis Price as The Bad Lord Byron and Wilfrid Hyde-White as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde! There's also a long sequence from the Walter Forde silent comedy Would You Believe It! (1929), which is funnier than the rest of the film.

                      Comment


                      • Loophole (1981)

                        Cool exciting thriller with Martin Sheen as an unemployed Architect with an expensive lifestyle, who reluctantly joins forces with gentleman crook Albert Finney, for a bank heist in the city of London.
                        Sheen the Architect devises an ingenious way into the vaults, through the sewer system.
                        Co-produced by Julian Holloway and with a typical jagged score by Lalo Schifrin, it holds the attention and only the ending is a bit of a muddle.
                        Finney is wonderful as the unflappable villain.
                        With Susannah York, Jonathon Pryce, Colin Blakely, Alfred Lynch.

                        Comment


                        • agutterfan
                          agutterfan commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I saw this yesterday (Tivoed from Sony Movie Channel). Thoroughly enjoyed it until the last five minutes. Without spoiling it for anyone, how did Martin Sheen accomplish it? The competely lame ending ruined it for me.
                          Last edited by agutterfan; 13th October 2018, 08:37 PM.

                      • Across The Lake (1988) Antony Hopkins .

                        Story of Donald Campbell's fatefull water speed record attempt on Lake Coniston .
                        Tv fare lifted by the enigmatic spirit of Campbell himself .


                        'Skipper and boat stay together ' - Donald Campbell .

                        Trivia : The body and boat were raised from the water some years later .


                        Last edited by AlecLeamas; 12th October 2018, 01:52 PM.

                        Comment


                        • The Pursuers (1961)

                          A Paris based group of Concentration camp survivors, hunt down a former Nazi rumoured to be living in London.
                          The Danziger's get serious!! Well not really, after an opening caption board reminds us of the atrocities that occurred only a dozen years or so before, this thriller co written by Brian Clemens, settles down into a by the numbers chase yarn.
                          Cyril Shaps in probably his only lead role, is the German businessman, being tracked across London by a vengeful Francis Matthews and coming under the watchful eye of crooked nightclub owner Sheldon Lawrence.
                          I think this is The Danzigers production that Francis Matthews mentioned was so poverty stricken, that he had to use his own personal car as his characters car.

                          Comment


                          • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) on Talking Pictures yesterday. It was good to see the old Express building on Fleet Street again.

                            Steve

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                            • I hope to be watching it tonight.

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