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  • Windom's Way (1957). Yes, it's Peter Finch once again playing a dedicated doctor in a far-off place (Malaya) with a strained marriage, potential romantic entanglements with his nurse and revolting natives. The familiar set-up has a confusing storyline, however, and it's not exactly clear who the good doctor ultimately prefers: the authoritarian government or the downtrodden locals, and he's stuck in the middle, with rebel forces in the hills. Mary Ure plays his wife, out to try and revive their marriage and Natasha Parry the attractive Malayan head nurse. Robert Flemyng and Michael Hordern play inter-changeable roles and Marne Maitland is the government commissioner, plus there's a fair bit of casting (John Cairney, Olaf Pooley, George Margo, etc.) that would not be acceptable nowadays. Director Ronald Neame makes the most of what he's given, but the extensive location filming, in Corsica I believe, does not get a wonderful showing in the beat-up Eastman Colour print I saw. And unusually, there's a non-horror score from James Bernard.

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    • Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie. What a terrible, terrible mess. And that's putting it politely. We used to enjoy the TV series, but this film is a clunker from beginning to end. A parade of celebs cannot disguise the desperate gags, the wayward direction and the almost accidental editing in this disaster of a movie. We didn't watch it last night, it was a few nights ago but it's taken me this long to recover enough to type.

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      • Children Galore (1954). An unengaging hour long comedy, albeit with a sudden death, a limbering up for director Terence Fisher before he dipped into vats of kensington gore. The women certainly rule the roost in a country village where there's a competition to get a new cottage, all dependent upon who has the largest family. Old time family feuds soon emerge and despite spirited playing by the likes of Eddie Byrne, Marjorie Rhodes and Betty Ann Davies and with June Thorburn and Richard Leech as the romantic leads, it's all very mild stuff which generates faint smiles rather than belly laughs (with the possible exception of a reaction from Violet Gould when she seems to mouth the word "fart"). Made at Brighton Film Studios.
        Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 4th January 2019, 10:28 PM.

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        • Wheel of Fate (1953). An archetypal crime "B" cheaply produced and directed by Francis Searle at Riverside Studios.
          Sandra Dorne is "Lucky", who starts out at her bad busty blonde bombshell best, then turns into an angelic sensitive girl, with Bryan Forbes in the Dirk Bogarde role as her boyfriend, the tearaway Ted. Patric Doonan plays Johnny, the sensible stepbrother who falls for Lucky and encourages her transformation. Ted is generally a bad lad, typically owing money to hood Martin Benson and under the watchful eyes of Detective Sergeant "Simmy" Simpson (John Horsley), who just happens to be an old wartime pal of Johnny's. Funds are needed quickly and Ted hits upon a scheme to get it from his ailing bedridden stepfather.
          Most of the usual clichés are inact despite there being apparently about 16 minutes missing from the version I have, which presumably features more of Martin Benson and all of Bernard Rebel, who is credited but is nowhere to be seen. At least we still get to hear Ted yell out the deathless "Come on, copper, you won't get me alive" line.

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          • Davy (1957)

            Music hall comic Davy Morgan wants to be a singer and finally gets a shot at the big time with an audition at Covent Garden, but his family aren't keen on him breaking up the act.
            Despite the best efforts of the ever cheerful Harry Secombe as Davy, this is a glum and rather maudlin affair.
            Harry does at least get some comic business at Collins Music Hall, with the families decorating act, similar to the sort of schtick Norman Wisdom used to do.
            With Ron Randall, George Relph, Susan Shaw, Alexander Knox and Bill Owen.

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            • To Dorothy, A Son (1954). The American title, Cash on Delivery, is in fact a better one for the quite cleverly devised comedy from a play by Roger MacDougall written and produced by Peter (Carry On) Rogers. Shelley Winters is Myrtle La Marr, an American club singer who will inherit $2M if her husband doesn't produce a male heir by a certain date. Trouble is, she's now divorced and her ex has remarried and his wife is expecting a baby any day! Myrtle flies over to England to resolve the situation but complications start to pile up and there are many reversals (and babies) to cope with.
              There's witty amusement from some of the situations and experienced at this sort of thing are Mona Washbourne and Wilfrid Hyde White, plus Joan Sims, Alfie Bass, Charles Hawtrey, Marjorie Rhodes and Nicholas Parsons, while Peggy Cummins as the expectant mother spends the entire film in bed. John Gregson is the hapless husband, or former husband, or bigamist, or none of the foregoing depending where we are with the plot, but I've always found him more suited to drama than comedy. Shelley's approach to comedy seems to be a competition to see who can shout the loudest - and she wins. And there's a Doctor Cameron yet again, but this time he's played by Aubrey Mather in his last film.

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              • agutterfan
                agutterfan commented
                Editing a comment
                A new avatar for a New Year, Mr Lovell?

            • The Astronaut Farmer (Billy Bob Thornton, 2006). We seem to be watching a few Billy Bob Thornton films recently. He certainly has a way with him. Charles Farmer (Thornton) is an ex-NASA trained astronaut who never made it into space and had to retire early to take care of his ailing farm, but he never lost his hankering for space adventure. He tours the local schools giving talks on space and 'how to be an astronaut' etc and is actually constructing a space rocket at home - AND intends to pilot it in Earth orbit.
              It's hard to know quite how to categorise this film. It certainly strays well into fantasyland when we see the mega-rocket he is building and the 10,000 gallons of rocket fuel he gets from 'a friendly dealer', but in the end it's less about the space travel and more about a struggling family who pull together through hard times to help their dad get his obsession out of his system. Quite nice really, despite the unbelievability of it all.
              Last edited by Andy2; 6th January 2019, 09:04 AM.

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              • Actually watched today,
                Hue and Cry (1946). A boy’s own adventure with Jack Warner in a rare role as a baddie (he usually plays policemen or father figures). Also with Harry Fowler as the leader of the gang of boys.

                Then I watched In Which We Serve (1942) starring (& co-directed by) Noel Coward with John Mills, Bernard Miles, Celia Johnson and Richard Attenborough doing his famous impersonation of a snivelling coward.

                A great double bill, both on BBC2 so not any ad breaks anywhere

                Steve

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                • Not a brit film but I watched Flight (2012) Starring Denzel Washington,Great film from all those involved.

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                  • Black Mirrors: Bandersnatch (2018)

                    I am unfamiliar with the television series so can't say if the feature is representative or not. Computer programmers struggle to make sense of their world, one of many in an alternative reality. There is a nice recreation of 1980's London but the performances are stilted, particularly Will Poutlter, and I accept they are supposed to be nerds but that doesn't excuse them for being so unsympathetic. Worse than that, the narrative is confused and confusing, I stuck with it for the first half, watched with one eye on my iPad for ten minites and then lost interest completely.

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                    • The Belstone Fox 1973 .

                      At first I Was Just curious to see a live action version of the fox and hound .

                      But pleasently suprised to see a young Dennis Waterman and two or more other familiar faces .

                      It dosnt sugar coat the subject of fox hunting and has a darker tone for a PG Rating .










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                      • Crucible of Horror (1971), starring Michael and Simon Gough, and Michael's daughter in law Sharon Gurney

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                        • Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post
                          Not a brit film but I watched Flight (2012) Starring Denzel Washington,Great film from all those involved.
                          Yes, I saw that a couple of years ago and quite enjoyed it (as I always do with Denzel in a film!). They tended to show the crash in trailers and reviews but that was only one part of the story...

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                          • The Vanishing (2018)

                            Every schoolboy growing up in Scotland in the 1950s knows the Flannan Isle poem about the disappearance of the three lighthouse keepers from an isolated rock in North Sea. Hollywood action star Gerard Bulter returns to his roots to play one of the trio but the leading role goes to the always excellent Peter Mullen. The acting, and I never thought I would say this about a 'Gerard Bulter move' is excellent, but the slow moving narrative struggles to hold attention over the 90mins. It's worth seeing but there probably won't be many revisits.

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                            • A few watched today:

                              The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
                              Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!
                              That’s the 1951 original cold-war scare-fest, not the poor 2008 remake. But the one starring Michael Rennie & Patricia Neal.

                              Also Se7en (1995)
                              Crazy title, crazy film
                              Starring Morgan Freeman & Brad Pitt
                              There are seven deadly sins

                              to record & watch later 84 Charing Cross Road (1987)
                              with Anne Bancroft, Anthony Hopkins & Judi Dench
                              A love story about a woman in love with good books & the man who satisfies her need

                              Steve

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