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  • Waterloo (1970)

    I love watching the two armies maneuvering around the battlefield in the great days before CGI, and the spectacular cavalry charges, which have to be amongst the most exciting ever filmed. The impact diminishes every time someone opens their mouths unfortunately, performances range from Steiger’s scenary chewing to Ian Ogilvy’s smirking indifference. The supporting cast include Virginia McKenna, who is always worth seeing, and Orson Welles, who isn’t.

    Great entertainment for the spectacle but seriously flawed as a movie.
    Last edited by Paxton Milk; 12th March 2019, 07:42 AM.

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    • Money Talks (1932). A creaky production full of stereotype Jewish humour with low patter of questionable taste today, but interesting in that it gives a leading role to boxer and later film extra Jack "Kid" Berg as one of the suitors for the hand of Judy Kelly, his rival being a very young Griffith Jones. Judy's father Julian Rose has to be skint to inherit a fortune, but finds he's rolling in money until he really needs it. The comedy is few and far between and the likes of Hal Gordon and Gus McNaughton do their usual material.

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      • I watched Carry On Regardless yesterday. It's arguably one of the best made - genuinely funny in many scenes and not reliant on double entendres etc. The actors were allowed to show their comedy talent in cameos, unlike the other films. Joan Sims, in particular, has that wonderful scene at the wine tasting - real clowning and perhaps unusual then, to let a woman completely dominate a long scene? Then caught a bit of A Square Peg - I'm not a Norman Wisdom fan but again, lovely funny scene with him and Hattie Jacques singing German opera. Good stuff.

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        • Andy2
          Andy2 commented
          Editing a comment
          I agree. We like the early Norman Hudis ones far more than the later Talbot Rothwell scripts. They have far more warmth and heart to them rather than just being a sort of 'wham bam' of crude double (and often single!) entendres. 'Regardless' is one of the best along with Constable. And Teacher....

      • Don't think I've got the hand of this new forum yet, so hope my posts are going where they should!

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        • A change from the usual - and frankly monotonous - Sunday night schedule (Ronald Howard's Sherlock Holmes, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Tales of the Unexpected, Edgar Wallace films), as they're such long-running series.

          I have had only two memories of the 1991 Rumbelows (League) Cup Final between Manchester United and Sheffield Wednesday since I watched it Live on ITV that day so I thought I'd try my luck on YouTube and found several clips. Poorly edited highlights but not the full match. Although pleased to be reminded of John Sheridan's winning goal (a powerful shot that went in off the post), I couldn't find the later incident where the injured United goalkeeper Les Sealey had an almighty row with his players as he was advised to leave the field.

          As I recall, Brian Moore interrupted co-commentator Jimmy Greaves with "Look at this! ... Well I've never seen that before!". The accidental collision with his player was shown in the videos, NOT the dramatic aftermath. Very disappointing not to have that memory rekindled. The sadly late Sealey's rant has occasionally come to mind over the years and it was last week's League Cup Final that prompted me to look for the ultimately elusive clip. The Chelsea 'keeper was involved in a very similar situation, refusing to go off and upsetting his manager.

          Day and night, YouTube threatens to disrupt my planned viewing and that's what happened last night (I also have to worry about tiredness and forced sleep). A recommended link to a playlist of One Step Beyond episodes resulted in my surprise viewing of the very first - The Bride Possesssed. The quality of the upload looked pristine compared to the two I'd seen previously. One had the terrifying presence of Roger Delgado, the other a young Charles Bronson playing a boxer.

          In this first story, Skip Homeier - from The Gunfighter - is a newly married man who is horrified to see his wife (Virginia Leith) suddenly become a distant woman, not recognising and angrily refusing to acknowledge him. It turns out the bride has been possessed by the spirit of a dead woman. Cult favourite Harry Townes is the doctor who tries to solve the problem. Oddly enough, my beloved Vera Miles uderwent a bleak change of personality in another series opener - the first episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, a few years earlier.

          I'm going to watch the next One Step Beyond later tonight and make it a regular Monday night fixture from now on, along with The Ghost and Mrs. Muir series. Sundays are congested enough as it is.

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          • Originally posted by Windyridge View Post
            Don't think I've got the hand of this new forum yet, so hope my posts are going where they should!
            Good to see you on here at last, Windyridge.

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            • Holmes and Watson (2019)

              Is it as bad as everybody says? Well, kind of. It is certainly a mess but I will watch John C Reilly in anything and there is also Ralph Fiennes, Pam Ferris, Rebecca Hall, Steve Coogan et al. to distract from the lame slapstick, flat performances and laboured jokes.

              I smiled once or twice but I won’t be rushing to watch it again. Ever.

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              • Rentadick (1972). There's a great cast, but also a silly, undisciplined and sprawling script from John Cleese and Graham Chapman about Ronald Fraser's security firm tasked by Donald Sinden to (a) protect his secret gas and its formula from Japanese spies led by Tsai Chin and (b) keep an eye on his wife Julie Ege. It's quite difficult to keep eyes off Julie, as Richards Briers and Beckinsale discover. Meantime, James Booth, John Wells and Kenneth Cope want to pinch the secrets for the benefit of Michael Bentine, whose private airstrip is manned by Spike Milligan. Told you it was silly, undisciplined and sprawling.
                However, it has to be said the cast, also featuring Derek Griffiths, Patricia Quinn, David Battley and Penelope Keith, go for it full on and director Jim Clark keeps the proceedings going at a lick. Sexist, racist and lavatorial jokes abound, but it is 1972.

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                • Girls will be Boys (1934). In current society, this may be desirable to some, but here it's just a silly but entertaining comedy directed by Marcel Varnel. Dolly Haas is the granddaughter of female-hating Cyril Maude and to get into his good books, she pretends to be his grandson and the usual mishaps occur. A young Esmond Knight, before he was able to take out his glass eye to horrify his fellow performers, is the romantic lead and Edward Chapman is rather good as a pompous but bumbling manservant/companion to old Cyril. From a play by Kurt (Curt) Siodmak, but surprisingly, a brain transplant isn't part of the plot.
                  Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 15th March 2019, 07:20 PM.

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                  • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                    Girls will be Boys (1934). ...
                    A young Esmond Knight, before he was able to take out his glass eye to horrify his fellow performers, is the romantic lead
                    Esmond was quite a handsome chap in his youth and was often the romantic lead in his early films

                    Steve

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                    • Great Expectations (2012)

                      Lavish adaptation from the director of Four Weddings and a Funeral, with a stellar cast, including Ralph Fiennes, Helen Bonham Carter, Sally Hawkins, Robbie Coltrane, etc. etc. I loved the production design and the two juvenile leads were excellent but, avoiding any puns around the the title, it didn’t quick come together as I’d hoped. The vivid imagery in my head, inspired by Dickens faultless prose, was bette, the characters both weirder and more real, but maybe that’s the curse of filming such a classic. It’s good but not great.

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                      • The Airzone Solution (Jon Pertwee et al 1993). Good grief. Doomwatch meets the Timelords, and there are four of them! Plus Nicola Bryant and Alan Cumming. Take a handful of ex-Dr Who actors, get the budget from petty cash, knock up a poor script and then film it on tape. What could possibly go wrong?
                        The story about an evil company pretending to solve an environmental crisis while actually conspiring to make things worse is good and would have done Doomwatch proud, but the script is limp and the direction somewhat intermittent. Apparently the mighty Tom Baker could see which way the wind was blowing and declined the offer.
                        Sorry to sound so negative, but this is one that should have stayed in the can.

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                        • I watched "The Image" (1967) on youtube.
                          A 16 minute short written & directed by Michael Armstrong.
                          Michael Byrne plays an artist who's painting comes alive to haunt him.
                          A silent horror film which has the added interest of a young David Bowie playing the ghost!

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                          • Wee Man (2013)

                            Martin Compston has cornered the market in diminutive thugs and he leads here as real-life Glasgow hard-man Paul Ferris, a particularly unpleasant example of the species. The filmmakers conform to the prerequisite for modern British gangster movies by having every second word an expletive, inserting random and brutal acts of violence, and confusing moody photography and loud noise for narrative development. Glasgow comes out of particularly badly

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                            • Conduct Unbecoming (1975). A rather odd choice for a film in the 70s, and I can't see that it would have been a crowd-pleasing blockbuster, this is in effect a courtroom drama that sticks pretty solidly to its stage origins, set in a British regimental HQ in 1878 India. The tribunal is an unofficial subalterns' court martial which has to consider what appears to be a clear cut case, but which develops into something much darker, despite the honour of gentlemen and the regiment being more important factors than the truth.
                              Michael York does his principled innocent stuff as he is forced to defend fellow junior officer James Faulkner on a charge of assaulting Susannah York. Trevor Howard is the red-faced colonel with Richard Attenborough, Christopher Plummer and James Donald under him, all potentially involved in a cover-up. Stacy Keach adopting an acceptable accent does remarkably well as the determined but ultimately not unreasonable president of the tribunal.
                              The subject matter is more suited to the television and the ending is a bit far-fetched, but director Michael Anderson keeps the production moving along intriguingly.
                              Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 16th March 2019, 05:31 PM.

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