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  • BVS
    replied
    Midas Run (1969)
    Fred Astaire,Richard Crenna,Anne Heywood + some familiar British faces.
    A fairly typical 1960's caper film.
    The plot is of course the usual hokum - but some lovely locations inc Venice and rural Italy and also some really high quality footage of an Invicta Airlines DC4 (G-ASEN) in flight and landing at a smallish airfield

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  • BVS
    replied
    Robbery (1967)
    Stanley Baker et al
    Funnily enough I had never seen this film before - loosely based on The Great Train Robbery and very nicely filmed too - the robbery scenes were shot at Theddingworth,Leics. (between HusBos and Mkt Harborough) on a recently closed double tracked Line,a very good stand in for the actual robbery location in Buckinghamshire.
    The Film Robbers hideout was underneath the Control Tower at a disused airfield (actually RAF Graveley near Huntingdon).
    The film train is hauled by Class 40 diesel (D318).
    There is also some lovely footage of the old Airfield at Graveley.
    Some lovely 'Classic' cars and vans are included of course

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    I’ve just been watching:
    San Demetrio, London (1943) on TPTV
    The crew of merchant seamen are shepherding a tanker full of oil from Galveston, TX back to the Clyde. But their convoy is attacked by the Admiral Scheer. The armed merchantman Jervis Bay sacrifices herself in an attempt to give the convoy time to escape. But the Scheer still attacks the San Demetrio whose skipper tells them to abandon ship.

    After a a couple of days in the lifeboat the crew spot a ship! As they make their way up to it they realise it is the old San Demetrio, on fire and burning well, but still afloat. So the crew re-board her, tackle the fires & manage to bring her home.
    Based quite accurately on a true story. A great film. Really stirring stuff.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    This England (1941). Wartime propaganda piece about the value of the land and its defiant defence set in 1941, 1086, 1588, 1804 and 1918 in a small English village with the same actors (John Clements, Constance Cummings, Emlyn Williams, Esmond Knight, Walter Fitzgerald et al) playing generations of the same characters - in-breeding clearly encouraged! The message is thumped home pretty hard, so there's lots of stiff upper lip stuff plus a brief appearance from Roddy McDowall and (at least the voice of) Felix Aylmer. Apparently re-titled Our Heritage in Scotland.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 11 January 2021, 07:18 PM.

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  • Gerald Lovell
    commented on 's reply
    Definitely!

  • agutterfan
    replied
    The Seventh Veil (1945). Ann Todd begins the film looking like Greta Garbo (you expect her to say to Dr Larsen "I vant to be alone") in hospital where she escapes to jump into the Thames. Enter psychiatrist Dr Larsen, played by Herbert Lom with an Austrian accent (presumably he couldn't do Scandinavian) who must have used this as his audition piece for The Human Jungle seventeen years later. He explains the film's title (the veils being the layers of the mind, hence the poster "it dares to strip bare a woman's mind") then puts her under hypnosis to discover why she tried to commit suicide.

    The film is then mostly told chronologically in flashback, including one of those typical but brilliant 40s montage sequences. Ann Todd plays a concert pianist orphaned at 14 and made the ward of her dour guardian, James Mason, who becomes her musical svengali. She's beautiful in her artistic suffering, he's bullying and damaged, both literally (he has a limp) and emotionally (a misogynist who cannot abide being hugged). There's some great classical piano work, all credit to Eileen Joyce for this and for teaching Ann some short pieces for midshots, including Grieg's Piano Concerto, where she manages to play all the right notes and in the right order.

    The main weakness of the film, apart from the tropes of these women picture melodramas having been degraded by TV soaps over the years, is her two suitors. The first is an American jazz clarinettist, presumably to help U.S. sales (it was distributed there by Universal and did a roaring trade). So naturally the producers hired a Scottish golfer to play him. Hugh McDermott's handicap is a lack of charisma. Albert Lieven's is his inability to forget his impeccable Teutonic manners, even when declaring his passion. He plays the second suitor, a portrait painter (and a pretty bad one if his portrait of Ann is anything to go by), and scandalously for the time they live together unmarried. That she should prefer these two to James Mason seems to me the height of absurdity (though screenwriter Muriel Box might disagree), he has what his contemporary male actors seem to lack, a vibrant masculinity, aided by his fantastic deep baritone voice. You realise why the ladies loved him so, no matter how sadistic his characters were.

    In the end, Herbert Lom explains all as he would do weekly seventeen years later. It's a great yarn, melodramatic yes, but well written (an original story too) and briskly directed, you can see why this low budget film was number 1 at the U.K. box office that year. Along the way we also get some great night location shooting of London in the blackout, some great classical music, where the score's conductor Muir Mathiesen makes a sneak cameo as a conductor, and there's a nifty piece of product placement by Graham's Golden Lager. Now I wonder if any of our members are old enough to remember that tipple?


    Click image for larger version  Name:	?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bfi.org.uk%2Fsites%2Fbfi.org.uk%2Ffiles%2Fstyles%2Ffull%2Fpublic%2Fimage%2Fseventh-veil-1945-001-ann-todd-cane-james-mason.jpg%3Fitok%3D3p2x-N_F&f=1&nofb=1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	118.6 KB ID:	97205

    Last edited by agutterfan; 11 January 2021, 07:18 PM.

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  • agutterfan
    commented on 's reply
    So you gave it a D then Gerald?

  • tv horror
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you Gerald, I wonder why as his voice was distinctive enough?

  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Originally posted by tv horror View Post
    I was watching The Man Who Never Was 1956 and I noticed that the voice of Robert Brown was dubbed on listening to it carefully I came to the conclusion that it sounded very like Howard Marion Crawford, can anyone confirm this or am I wrong? Otherwise it's a very good film and quite suspenseful. Clifford Webb would have made a great detective if he would have been given his own series of films, before anyone mentions yes I know it was based on true facts.
    Yes, I believe it is Howard Marion-Crawford's voice.

    Leave a comment:


  • tv horror
    replied
    I was watching The Man Who Never Was 1956 and I noticed that the voice of Robert Brown was dubbed on listening to it carefully I came to the conclusion that it sounded very like Howard Marion Crawford, can anyone confirm this or am I wrong? Otherwise it's a very good film and quite suspenseful. Clifford Webb would have made a great detective if he would have been given his own series of films, before anyone mentions yes I know it was based on true facts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    The Asphyx (1972). Victorian amateur scientist Sir Hugo attempts to capture the soul of people about to die so that he can lock his up and become immortal. Of course, things don't go to plan.
    Reasonably handsomely mounted, but on a low budget, this is quite a stuffy and po-faced horror film which in some ways reminds me of its stablemate The Creeping Flesh, only this one has an uncomfortable Robert Stephens and a disinterested Robert Powell in their 1970s hairdos as the leads. It would have been a bit more entertaining if Vincent Price and Ian Ogilivy had played their roles, but as it is, the giggles do start as an acid-scarred Stephens stumbles down into the cellar trilling "my Asphyx, my Asphyx", probably hoping he doesn't fall on his. Jane Laportaire features as the daughter and somewhat surprisingly, the film was shot by Freddie Young under the direction of Peter Newbrook.

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  • Nick Dando
    replied
    Unfortunately it's very low quality. One of these days it'll be given a proper release.

    Leave a comment:


  • cornershop15
    replied
    Film Boards' copy seems okay. I wouldn't call it "ropey":

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
    Last edited by cornershop15; 9 January 2021, 05:52 PM. Reason: Corrected link.

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  • Nick Dando
    commented on 's reply
    Any chance of an answer to my query about Ivan Denisovich?

  • Tigon Man
    replied
    The Virgin Soldiers (1969)

    In Malaysia in 1951, young National Servicemen with the Pay Corps, try to lose their virginity with the local girls and see some action against Communist insurgents.
    Despite boasting some impressive credentials, a screenplay by John Hopkins, direction from John Dexter of the RSC and some some decent performances from Hywel Bennett, Lynn Redgrave, Nigel Davenport amongst others, this big screen version of Leslie Thomas bestselling novel, feels rather flat and lifeless.
    There is fun though in spotting young actors such as Peter Kelly, Roy Holder and even an uncredited Roger Lloyd Pack at the start of there careers.

    Leave a comment:

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