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  • orpheum
    commented on 's reply
    Sure it wasn't Apache Riffles?

  • cassidy
    replied
    Apache Drums (1951). Before everyone jumps up in the air because I have the temerity to put a western into a Britmovie forum, I have to tell you about the most ridiculous scene in a film that I have ever come across. Picture the scene, the townsfolk and a few remaining cavalry officers are holed up up in a building surrounded by the Apaches who are beating their drums and chanting. Someone has the bright idea that they should start singing to show the Apaches that they are not afraid. What do they sing I ask you ? Well of course it has to be Men Of Harlech which the entire company including Stephen McNally and Coleen Grey perform in WELSH !!!!. Obviously the schools back in those days in the wild west were well versed in language tuition. I wonder this will ever be put out in a double bill with Zulu !!!!

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  • Andy2
    replied
    The Punch & Judy Man (Tony Hancock, Sylvia Syms et al 1963)
    I watched this film from DVD last night, the first time I've seen it for many years. Far from being the miserable flop I remembered, it was very entertaining and two scenes stood out for me. The first is the scene with 'the boy' in the ice cream parlour. Wally (Hancock) treats the boy to a top-whack 'Piltdown Glory', chocolate sauce, nuts and wafers, the whole lot, and gets one for himself. What follows is a wonderful 'fight to the finish', as Wally tries to keep up with the kid. The finale, with Wally flipping the cherry into the air and catching it in his mouth with obvious glee, is enough to have me cheering and winding back for another look. Hancock's grinning face as the pair leave the shop speaks volumes. BTW, we get a bonus in the shape of Eddie Byrne, an actor who (like Sam Kydd and Michael Ripper) popped up in almost every British film of the period. Byrne plays the ice cream salesman and although he doesn't say much, his performance is almost a scene-stealer. Only Hancock's sparkling happiness at the end of the scene keeps him at bay. The second one comes at the very end of the film, as Wally and Delia have a renewed understanding of each other's wants, needs and failings. It really is quite tender, with Hancock turning himself down to almost zero and we can see their marriage blossoming once again. Then it's straight into the end credits which (behind the titles) shows Wally and Delia being waved off by their friends as they drive along the promenade, heading for pastures new. The triumphant music puts the lid on in style. The last thing is the 'comedy set pieces' which tended to be overlong and look as if they were inserted because Hancock needed some laughs. They were not particularly hilarious and tended break up the flow. However, if they had been removed the running time would have been about 60 minutes and the film could easily have been presented as a TV play, perhaps with better results. Still an enjoyable film though, and the sunny outdoor photography is a treat.

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  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

    No, but if you are going to make a wartime action/adventure some nasty baddies help things along!
    Not if you're P&P - Nasty baddies are too easy. Nice enemies are much more challenging

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Odeonman
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    The main objection was from Emeric Pressburger. Like the Battle of the River Plate, the real story was so incredible he couldn't really add much to it

    Major General Kreipe wasn't a nasty Nazi, he was a decent German. Not all Germans were nasty brutes

    Steve
    No, but if you are going to make a wartime action/adventure some nasty baddies help things along!

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Odeonman View Post
    Ill Met By Moonlight (1957) I've managed to get through nearly sixty years of watching movies without seeing this, the final proper collaboration of Powell and Pressburger, but recently bought a cheap second hand DVD of it (an excellent transfer in the correct ratio) and watched it last night. I believe that Powell himself didn't think much of this effort and I'm not surprised. If you are going to make a film based on a real wartime operation you might think to offer a little tension and excitement, both of which are totally lacking here. This is in no small part due to P & P's predilection to not have nasty Germans in their films, but that is actually what you need in this type of thing. Instead we have jolly decent chaps in a jolly decent jape with the German General telling them at the end "jolly good show old chaps" or something like it. The performances of Dirk Bogarde and David Oxley are so effete that I was irresistibly reminded of Julian and Sandy from Round the Horne.
    Amazingly, this was one of the top films at the UK box office in 1957 (but then so was the awful Three Men in a Boat), largely due to Bogarde's popularity and he would have further success later in the year with Doctor at Large and Campbell's Kingdom.
    The main objection was from Emeric Pressburger. Like the Battle of the River Plate, the real story was so incredible he couldn't really add much to it

    Major General Kreipe wasn't a nasty Nazi, he was a decent German. Not all Germans were nasty brutes

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Odeonman
    replied
    Ill Met By Moonlight (1957) I've managed to get through nearly sixty years of watching movies without seeing this, the final proper collaboration of Powell and Pressburger, but recently bought a cheap second hand DVD of it (an excellent transfer in the correct ratio) and watched it last night. I believe that Powell himself didn't think much of this effort and I'm not surprised. If you are going to make a film based on a real wartime operation you might think to offer a little tension and excitement, both of which are totally lacking here. This is in no small part due to P & P's predilection to not have nasty Germans in their films, but that is actually what you need in this type of thing. Instead we have jolly decent chaps in a jolly decent jape with the German General telling them at the end "jolly good show old chaps" or something like it. The performances of Dirk Bogarde and David Oxley are so effete that I was irresistibly reminded of Julian and Sandy from Round the Horne.
    Amazingly, this was one of the top films at the UK box office in 1957 (but then so was the awful Three Men in a Boat), largely due to Bogarde's popularity and he would have further success later in the year with Doctor at Large and Campbell's Kingdom.

    Leave a comment:


  • zabadak
    replied
    Originally posted by cassidy View Post
    G.I.Blues (1960). Yesterday (Friday) being the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley, it had to be one of his films. G.I.Blues bought back many happy memories for me so that was my choice even though it was by no means one of his best. It does have however some very nice songs. The story is of Elvis and his pals in his platoon trying to raise some money to open a night club and Elvis trying to win the money needed by means of a bet to see if he can spend the night with dancer Juliet Prowse.. I particularly loved the closing number Did'ja Ever. Produced by Hal Wallis and directed by Norman Taurog. As I said, it bought back many happy memories.
    King Creole is my favourite Pelvis Pic

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Anthony McKay View Post
    Red Shoes (1948)

    First time - never seen it before, but I'm giving the P&P films a go, particularly the ones I seem to have missed.

    I loved 'Black Narcissus' and 'I Know Where I'm Going' was a revelation - such great characters and a wonderful settings.

    'Red Shoes' - I very much liked seeing the students and how London was portrayed. But much of the film was about the privileged classes - Julian Caster could have been an angry young man - but his throwing a tantrum at the end of the film was a big let down - AND - surely he had a chance to take off his raincoat on his trip from London!

    Having said that, the characters were an interesting mix and the range of actors new to me were a pleasant surprise - a very cosmopolitan mix. Also the locations - the filming in France - an unexpected pleasure.

    I was expecting a bit more ballet - the 'Red Shoes' ballet was shorter and more confusing that expected - although the special effects tricks seem to have been the intended highlight. Given the option I'd have rather seen more of Coppélia.

    After the 'Red Shoes' ballet the rest of the film seems to be an afterthought - over-long and melodramatic.

    I appreciated the ambitious nature of the project and the use of colour and space - but it's ambition is probably its downfall.
    Many (most?) people seem to think that it's a film about ballet.

    But you can't please all of the people all of the time

    I believe it's not a film just or primarily about ballet, it's actually about artistic dedication, and what it can cost you.

    Steve


    Leave a comment:


  • Anthony McKay
    replied
    Red Shoes (1948)

    First time - never seen it before, but I'm giving the P&P films a go, particularly the ones I seem to have missed.

    I loved 'Black Narcissus' and 'I Know Where I'm Going' was a revelation - such great characters and a wonderful settings.

    'Red Shoes' - I very much liked seeing the students and how London was portrayed. But much of the film was about the privileged classes - Julian Caster could have been an angry young man - but his throwing a tantrum at the end of the film was a big let down - AND - surely he had a chance to take off his raincoat on his trip from London!

    Having said that, the characters were an interesting mix and the range of actors new to me were a pleasant surprise - a very cosmopolitan mix. Also the locations - the filming in France - an unexpected pleasure.

    I was expecting a bit more ballet - the 'Red Shoes' ballet was shorter and more confusing that expected - although the special effects tricks seem to have been the intended highlight. Given the option I'd have rather seen more of Coppélia.

    After the 'Red Shoes' ballet the rest of the film seems to be an afterthought - over-long and melodramatic.

    I appreciated the ambitious nature of the project and the use of colour and space - but its ambition is probably its downfall.
    Last edited by Anthony McKay; 21st August 2019, 10:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    replied
    Callan: Wet Job (1981)

    You are never retired from the service as Callan finds out.
    Quietly running a militaria shop and lodging with a wealthy widow, he is bought out of mothballs to deal with someone who is planning to write a tell-all book about a killing committed by Callan in the name of the service.
    A bit of a lack lustre end to the brilliant stories of James Mitchell.
    Despite being written by Mitchell himself, this is more wet dishrag then wet job. There is little for Lonely to do (Now for some reason a Plumber) and Hunter played by Hugh Walters is far too effete.
    Edward Woodward himself looks a bit bored with proceedings and there is precious little action.
    With Russell Hunter, Angela Browne, George Sewell and Anthony Smee.
    Last edited by Tigon Man; 20th August 2019, 04:00 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy2
    commented on 's reply
    I was never keen on Elvis films but that number is good fun, and the final 'didja ever?' into the camera is a nice touch.

  • cassidy
    replied
    G.I.Blues (1960). Yesterday (Friday) being the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley, it had to be one of his films. G.I.Blues bought back many happy memories for me so that was my choice even though it was by no means one of his best. It does have however some very nice songs. The story is of Elvis and his pals in his platoon trying to raise some money to open a night club and Elvis trying to win the money needed by means of a bet to see if he can spend the night with dancer Juliet Prowse.. I particularly loved the closing number Did'ja Ever. Produced by Hal Wallis and directed by Norman Taurog. As I said, it bought back many happy memories.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tonch
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy2 View Post
    Let us Live (Henry Fonda, Maureen O'Hara 1939)
    We watched this film for the very first time last night and what a surprisingly good film it is. Of course with a young Henry Fonda in the lead part, we should have known. Fonda plays 'Brick' Tennant, a young man who is working as a taxi driver and saving hard to marry his sweetheart. Through a series of co-incidences and the lack of a hard alibi, he is suspected - and eventually found guilty of - robbery and murder. It's a classic 'wrong man' thriller, made all the better by the careful character introduction and set-up early on in the film. If the film has a message, it is that the death penalty is a dangerous thing, especially when careers and promotions are on the line. There's no slack in the film, and its short 68 minute running time whizzes by. A little gem of a movie, and a story which Fonda would tell again in Hitchcock's 'The Wrong Man' of 1956, another cracker. Short but very sweet.
    Re-made as a BritMovie with 1954's Eight O'Clock Walk starring Richard Attenborough and apparently based on a true story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy2
    replied
    Let us Live (Henry Fonda, Maureen O'Hara 1939)
    We watched this film for the very first time last night and what a surprisingly good film it is. Of course with a young Henry Fonda in the lead part, we should have known. Fonda plays 'Brick' Tennant, a young man who is working as a taxi driver and saving hard to marry his sweetheart. Through a series of co-incidences and the lack of a hard alibi, he is suspected - and eventually found guilty of - robbery and murder. It's a classic 'wrong man' thriller, made all the better by the careful character introduction and set-up early on in the film. If the film has a message, it is that the death penalty is a dangerous thing, especially when careers and promotions are on the line. There's no slack in the film, and its short 68 minute running time whizzes by. A little gem of a movie, and a story which Fonda would tell again in Hitchcock's 'The Wrong Man' of 1956, another cracker. Short but very sweet.

    Leave a comment:

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