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  • bozo
    started a topic Watched Last Night

    Watched Last Night

    Madeleymade




    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell

    Death on the Nile (1978). For me, this is probably the best of the big screen Poirot outings with Peter Ustinov, before he got silly in the role, a much more straight forward and less mannered and less strangulated accented Hercule than Albert Finney. It's another star-studded enclosed setting murder mystery, though this time a travel log as much as a murder mystery, though you don't need to be Poirot to work out who's responsible. David Niven, Bette Davis, Angela Lansbury, Mia Farrow, Lois Chiles, Maggie Smith and George Kennedy are among the star-studdeders and John Guillermin's expert direction keeps the thing, a trifle long, all sailing along entertainingly well.



    I much prefer it to Orient Express, which is let down by Finney's odd portrayal.
    This does have dodgy accents though from Jack Warden and Farrow's weird Audrey Hepburn-ish British aristocrat shtick.




    Last edited by bozo; 1st January 2017, 12:48 AM.

  • Paxton Milk
    replied
    Vampira (1975)

    Sad to see a talented cast trying so desperately to be funny, and failing so emphatically. The whole thing is a depressing experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Escort for Hire (1960). Another Danziger Technicolor extravaganza made at the New Elstree Studios one afternoon. Almost a companion piece to The Spider's Web with most of the same crew, this has June Thorburn running a male escort agency which gets Noel Trevarthen, Pete Murray and Derek Blomfield on its books. As Jill falls for Noel, the idiotic plot has him implicated in the murder of Jan Holden and of course all rally to prove his innocence, cheerfully lying to and generally obstructing the police as they go. Pete plays an American with a bizarre accent and rarely lets a small hat leave his head. Peter Butterworth is back as a straighter but constantly masticating police inspector. Also spending a few hours doing this are Guy Middleton, Mary Laura Wood and Bruce Beeby, but they really should've got a better music editor as once again we are treated to bursts of an inappropriate background score when you least expect it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paxton Milk
    replied
    Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

    I am probably on my own on this but I much prefer the 2000 remake with Brendan Fraser and Elizabeth Hurley.
    You’re not entirely on your own. Given a Hobson’s Choice, I’d opt for the remake too, the original hasn’t aged well, IMO, but it’s a low bar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Metro1962
    replied
    Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
    Bedazzled (1967)

    My partner wanted to watch this one again, as it is a favourite of hers.
    Still enjoyable, if only occasionally laugh out loud funny.
    There are always new pleasures on watching again. I loved Michael Trubshawes's stammering Lord..
    I am probably on my own on this but I much prefer the 2000 remake with Brendan Fraser and Elizabeth Hurley.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    The Spider's Web (1960). A light-hearted Agatha Christie country house murder mystery from Danziger Productions Ltd., but this time they've shot it in very vivid Technicolor. It's Oliver Costello in the sitting room (but sometimes in the secret recess connecting to the library) with a heavy instrument. Glynis Johns is the highly imaginative tenant of the house whose inventiveness confounds the baffled police - a lovely turn from a befuddled Peter Butterworth - and she has Jack Hulbert as her guardian, Cicely Courtneidge as her gardener and even more baffling, a non-magical David Nixon as her manservant. John Justin, Ronald Howard, Basil Dignam and Anton Rodgers are also on hand and it's all fairly daft, brightly lit and suffers from frequent inappropriate bursts of background lift music. But there are nice views of Edgewarebury Hotel, well-designed sets, a goodly display of brown swede shoes which most of the men seem to favour, and for Ronald, the ability to change clothes and back again between shots, which is quite a mystery in itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • wadsy
    replied
    I just finished watching the 1970's series "Pretenders" on DVD.

    I remember watching this when it was first televised & it was absolutely brilliant!

    Historically accurate for the most part & the acting & location shooting were bang on!
    Last edited by wadsy; 17th April 2019, 12:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    I Live in Grosvenor Square (1945). Double flag waver with its "Anglo-American Scenario", more fundamentally titled A Yank in London in the USA, produced and directed by Herbert Wilcox and of course starring Anna Neagle. While doing its best to foster Anglo-American relations, the scenario frequently dips into melodramatic soap opera territory and there is quaint twee-ness to the British side most firmly shown from the point of view of the aristocracy, with Anna as Lady Patricia, Robert Morley as her grandfather the Earl of Exmoor and a series of butlers and hangers-on. The voice of the "common people" comes from Edward Rigby as a forelock-tugging pub landlord.The Yank in question is a toupeed Dean Jagger and Anna quickly falls for him notwithstanding she has had a lifelong "understanding" with an as yet un-toupeed Rex Harrison. A couple of scenes appear to have been shot in America featuring Jane Darwell as Dean's mom and Francis Pierlot as a mailman, but otherwise we get Welwyn Studios and some pleasant Devonshire locations.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlecLeamas
    replied
    And then there were none , aka , 10 Little Indians , (1974).

    Adaption of Christie sans amateur Slueth , The usual suspects played by vaguely familiar has beens .
    Suitably bleak setting . Rather plodding , actually .
    Last edited by AlecLeamas; Yesterday, 12:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Three Spare Wives (1961). A comedy with a title like this and based on a play by Talbot (Carry On) Rothwell and you'd expect saucy fun, but this is a Danziger afternoon production with a sedate and corny script by Edward Danziger's mother-in-law (albeit with some mother-in-law dig jokes), poor performances from everyone, apart from Doris Gilmore as an on-the-take maid, and static direction. To top it all, John Hewer, better known later as Captain Birdseye, is one of the leads and we don't even get to see if it's fish fingers he's eating in one scene.
    Annoyingly hapless George Pittock (pillock would be better) "inherits" three middle eastern brides from his Uncle Ben and tries to explain it all to his wife Susan and her mother, while his chiselling pal Rupert tries to wheel and deal and the Foreign Office gets involved. Susan Stephen, Robin Hunter, Barbara Leake, Ferdy Mayne and the aforementioned Mr. Hewer don't seem able to give the raised performances needed to try and lift the thing and repetitive background music doesn't help either. It all seems longer than its 70 minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    replied
    Bedazzled (1967)

    My partner wanted to watch this one again, as it is a favourite of hers.
    Still enjoyable, if only occasionally laugh out loud funny.
    There are always new pleasures on watching again. I loved Michael Trubshawes's stammering Lord..

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Lock Up Your Daughters! (1969). Three lusty lads return onshore after 10 months at sea and set about quenching their sexual desires with all and sundry. They inevitably fall foul of the corrupt law and it takes the wiles of the ladies to get them out of their predicaments.
    Another Tom Jonesian frolic, a rollicking restoration romp which is not nearly as funny as it thinks it is and despite having a decent cast and a screenplay by the talented Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall, it's not kept tight enough and the end result is rather a sprawling mess. Christopher Plummer has to be seen to be believed as the, well, foppish Lord Foppington and those used to this kind of nonsense are Jim Dale, Roy Kinnear, Fenella Fielding, Georgia Brown and Peter Bayliss. Not quite in their comfort zone are Susannah York, Tom Bell and Ian Bannen. Based on a musical by Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson, with lifts from Henry Fielding and John Vanbrugh, there are no songs but an almost wall-to-wall cheeky score from Ron Grainer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Death in High Heels (1947). What sounds like the fashionable shoes a lady might foolishly insist upon wearing to a wedding, this is in fact the first of the continuous line of postwar productions from Hammer Films (here Marylebone-Hammer Productions) and as with much of Hammer's early output, is a murder mystery. Filmed in a cupboard for about 2/6d, the only familiar faces are soon-to-be Dick Barton Don Stannard as the dogged Scotland Yard man, bitchy model Patricia Laffan, H-dropping Nora Gordon and uncredited, Nora's husband Leonard Sharp. With only Hats (), Photography, Direction and Production screen-credited, no-one takes the blame for the confusing screenplay, albeit with a twist at the end, or the non-existent sets, but director Tommy Tomlinson can be held to account for the hopeless staging and a failure to get any decent performances from the players. Thankfully, they could only afford to let the thing run for/had the decency to restrict it to 48 minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    replied
    Scorpion Tales (1978)
    Crimes of Persuasion

    Right wing MP Anthony Bate gets more than he bargained for, when he decides to trade his mistress Susan Engel, in for a newer model with more added extras..
    Fairly so-so penultimate entry in this series of plays from ATV, set against the backdrop of a terrorist bombing campaign.
    Saved from the totally mundane though, by a powerhouse performance by Susan Engel, playing it for all it's worth like a Greek tragedy.
    With Christopher Benjamin as an embarrassing and highly unlikely Arab and Chloe Salaman as the new model,

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    The Frozen Limits (1939). The Crazy Gang play The Six Wonder Boys who head off to the Yukon 40 years late to find gold in them thar hills. There's excellent rapid wordplay, some so quick it's difficult to make out, as well as raucous slapstick and sequences accompanied by "The Big Chase" on the soundtrack. The "boys" don't get songs to sing apart from the beginning and when they try to get Moore Marriott, in full Harbottle guise in all but name, get to sleep. Bernard Lee plays the unshaven villain after the hand of Eileen Bell and consequently ownership of a hidden gold mine. It's still quite amusing, and a typical Gainsborough Picture of the period, directed by Marcel Varnel and written by J. O. C. Orton, Marriott Edgar and Val Guest.

    Leave a comment:

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