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  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    The Camp on Blood Island (1957). Another notorious Hammer film, this one set in a Japanese POW camp at the end of the Second World War where the prisoners learn that Japan has been defeated, but don't want their jailers to know because the camp commandant has vowed that in the event of defeat, he will kill everyone.
    Extremely popular with the public but hated by the critics, the film is certainly very black and white not only in image but in depiction of the Japanese and (almost entirely) British prisoners so fostering hatred when reconciliation was the name of the political game by 1957. There a few, any any, Japanese actors appearing in the film: Ronald Radd is the commandant and his officers include Marne Maitland, Lee Montague and Michael Ripper. André Morell is the senior British officer with Walter Fitzgerald, Edward Underdown, Michael Goodliffe and Michael Gwynn plus Carl Mohner and Phil Brown. Barbara Shelley is the almost token female. They all sweat convincingly in the Berkshire and Buckinghamshire sunshine and it's all pretty unflinchingly directed by Val Guest.

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  • Tonch
    replied
    The Hatton Garden Job (2017)

    Pastiche of the Guy Ritchie Britgangster style, dramatising - with tongue firmly in cheek - the real life safety deposit vault heist carried out in London by ageing crooks in 2015.

    Larry Lamb, Phil Daniels, David Caulder and Clive Russell play the superannuated safebreakers carrying off their audacious plan under the guidance of the anonymous and entirely fictional co-ordinator Matthew Goode - something of a cipher (appropriately credited as "XXX") clearly engaged as a younger and more eye-pleasing sop to the cinematic audience. Joely Richardson plays the ice-cool Hungarian mobster pulling the strings; Mark Harris is the obligatory bent copper in a fairly pointless sub plot.

    The experienced older cast stretch their cheeky cockney shtik pretty thin in this formulaic romp, during which the viewer is never entirely sure - but doesn't really care - who is scamming whom.

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  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Half a Sixpence (1967). David Heneker's musical version of H. G. Wells' Kipps: orphaned shop apprentice Artie suddenly comes into an inheritance and is able to lead an elegant life, but finds it difficult to choose between his childhood sweetheart Ann and upper class gentlewoman Helen. While the story is straightforward enough, and some of the songs are tuneful (especially "Flash Bang Wallop"), I regret this George Sidney directed version isn't as it's very slowly paced, has its over-elaborate musical song and dance sequences going on far too long, and as a result, it feels like it takes Half a Day to watch it as it clocks in at a whopping 143 minutes. That's a lot of Tommy Steele to see, along with Julia Foster, Penelope Horner, Cyril Ritchard, James Villiers and Allan Cuthbertson.

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  • Tigon Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

    It's the bathing caps that always cracks me up.

    The robot was operated by Robert Jewell, kingpin Dalek operator in the 1960s.
    Yes the bathing caps are hilarious. Simon Oates looks as though he's about to laugh at one point, whilst wearing one.
    Pat Hayes gets the best scene, when looking around the spaceships shiny interior and commenting on how house proud they must be!

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  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    Originally posted by Tigon Man View Post
    The Terrornauts (1967)

    Probably not destined to be anyone's favourite film, unless it's for comedy value is this sci-fi tale from Amicus. Simon Oates, Stanley Meadows and Zena Marshall, are Scientists in an observatory, listening for messages from deep space. Ultimately they get more than they bargained for when their entire building is carried off by a giant spaceship, with all the fixtures and fittings and even the tea lady! The wonderful Patricia Hayes in full Mrs Cravat mode.
    With nervous accountant Charles Hawtrey along for the ride, and after an encounter with a benevolent robot, (That my partner thought looked like an egg whisk) they prepare to save Earth from invasion.
    Hilarious for all the wrong reasons, cheaply made and with rubbish special effects and stiffly acted by the leads.
    My partner laughed so hard, she wants to watch it again.
    It's the bathing caps that always cracks me up.

    The robot was operated by Robert Jewell, kingpin Dalek operator in the 1960s.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 21st January 2020, 04:04 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    replied
    The Terrornauts (1967)

    Probably not destined to be anyone's favourite film, unless it's for comedy value is this sci-fi tale from Amicus. Simon Oates, Stanley Meadows and Zena Marshall, are Scientists in an observatory, listening for messages from deep space. Ultimately they get more than they bargained for when their entire building is carried off by a giant spaceship, with all the fixtures and fittings and even the tea lady! The wonderful Patricia Hayes in full Mrs Cravat mode.
    With nervous accountant Charles Hawtrey along for the ride, and after an encounter with a benevolent robot, (That my partner thought looked like an egg whisk) they prepare to save Earth from invasion.
    Hilarious for all the wrong reasons, cheaply made and with rubbish special effects and stiffly acted by the leads.
    My partner laughed so hard, she wants to watch it again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tonch
    commented on 's reply
    Apparently it was President Eisenhower's favourite film, he screened it in full several times at The White House. It does have a rather devoted following. For me it's one of the few two and a half hour plus films I can happily sit through. Terrific stuff.

  • BVS
    replied
    Originally posted by Tonch View Post
    The Big Country (1958)
    One of the best films ever made and also one of very few films that I have watched more than twice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tonch
    replied
    The Big Country (1958)

    Sprawling epic with spectacular cinematography and an impressive cast, the almost three hour running time matches its grand scale yet the action rarely sags.

    Square-jawed, upstanding Gregory Peck moves West to marry his sweetheart Carroll Baker but quickly finds himself embroiled in a vicious feud between two rival clans, led by his prospective father in law Charles Bickford (with the support of frustrated right hand man Charlton Heston) and growling patriarch Burl Ives (backed up by feckless chancer of a son, Chuck Connors). In his final film (he died before its release) loyal factotum Alfonso Bedoya supports Peck every step of the way. The plot boils down to generations of bad blood over cattle watering rights on a stretch of river owned by school ma'am Jean Simmons.

    Strong performances throughout, but it's easy to see why Burl Ives, who steals every scene he's in, claimed the Academy Award. He was probably one of the few players who didn't clash with Director William Wyler, who fell out for three years with Peck, drove Simmons to tears, got through half a dozen changes of scriptwriter, had to be talked out of dropping the memorable and award nominated theme music and held blazing rows on set with Bickford.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by AlecLeamas View Post
    Hawk the Slayer (1980)
    Cheap as chips sword and scorcery not-so-epic . Think they used someones back garden as the outside location . Jack Palance as the patomime villian and John Terry as Hawk the yank .
    Bernard Bresslaw and Roy Kinnear bring abit of comedy relief .
    Don’t forget the elf (or whatever he is) with the rapid firing bow & arrow

    it’s good for a laugh

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • AlecLeamas
    replied
    Hawk the Slayer (1980)
    Cheap as chips sword and scorcery not-so-epic . Think they used someones back garden as the outside location . Jack Palance as the patomime villian and John Terry as Hawk the yank .
    Bernard Bresslaw and Roy Kinnear bring abit of comedy relief .

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    I watched it on bluray, cassidy.

    Leave a comment:


  • cassidy
    replied
    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    The Stranglers of Bombay (1960). Long boycotted from television showings, this Terence Fisher Hammer has started to appear again and it's a efficiently-made and well-directed piece of "historical" drama set in India although made at Bray and in nearby sandpits. It purports to show the violence of the Thugee cult and it is pretty explicit film for its day, surprisingly only garnering an "A" certificate. The characters are all stereotypes with Guy Rolfe extremely stiff as the captain who suspects what is going on, Andrew Cruickshank as his blustering colonel, Allan Cuthbertson as the officer whose ignorance is almost as great as his arrogance and, briefly, Jan Holden as Guy's wife. A saving grace is the relish with which those expert villains George Pastell, Marne Maitland and Roger Delgado (none of them Indian of course) deliver their wickedness.
    Was it shown on TV recently ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    replied
    The Spiral Staircase (1975)

    A murderer targets those with physical disabilities.
    A remake of the 1946 thriller, which I think itself was a remake . Jacqueline Bisset is the lady who has lost her ability to speak following the death of her husband and daughter in a fire.
    But Bracknell isn't Boston and Binfield Manor once again opens it's doors, as the institute where Jackie B. awaits her fate, in this pretty lumpy retelling of an oft told tale.
    With Christopher Plummer, Gayle Hunnicut, John Philip Law and Mildred Dunnock.
    Interestingly John Ronane who plays Jackie's love interest, is dubbed by Ed Bishop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerald Lovell
    replied
    The Stranglers of Bombay (1960). Long boycotted from television showings, this Terence Fisher Hammer has started to appear again and it's a efficiently-made and well-directed piece of "historical" drama set in India although made at Bray and in nearby sandpits. It purports to show the violence of the Thugee cult and it is pretty explicit film for its day, surprisingly only garnering an "A" certificate. The characters are all stereotypes with Guy Rolfe extremely stiff as the captain who suspects what is going on, Andrew Cruickshank as his blustering colonel, Allan Cuthbertson as the officer whose ignorance is almost as great as his arrogance and, briefly, Jan Holden as Guy's wife. A saving grace is the relish with which those expert villains George Pastell, Marne Maitland and Roger Delgado (none of them Indian of course) deliver their wickedness.

    Leave a comment:

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