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The Way to the Stars (1945)

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  • The Way to the Stars (1945)

    The war film that shows the British stiff upper lip at its finest

    SIMON HEFFER - TELEGRAPH - 15 MARCH 2020


    Bill Owen, John Mills and Douglass Montgomery in The Way To The Stars
    CREDIT: ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

    As we approach the 75th anniversary of V-E Day, we also approach the 75th anniversary of one of the most magnificent films made in Britain about the war, during the war: The Way to the Stars. Its origins werein Terence Rattigan's 1942 play Flare Path, which the playwright turned into a film over the summer and autumn of 1944, when it became clear that the Allied victory over the Nazis was only a matter of time. Rattigan had served in the RAFand the story was based on some of what he had observed during his service. By relaying those experiences in his customary understated style, which caused him in the Fifties and Sixties to be vilified by second-rate playwrights of the John Osborne school but which was actually the mark of his greatness, Rattigan created a screenplay of utter conviction. Those alive during the war described the film as portraying exactly how things were. Film is not intended to be a historical document, but sometimes it inevitably becomes one. This is one such film....

    Note: The remainder of this article is available only to Telegraph subscribers.

  • #2
    (Mostly) a great film - filmed at RAF Catterick (now Army Barracks),N Yorks.
    Very understated style,rare footage of Douglas Boston light bombers during the RAF phase of the story,and some nice gentle humour throughout.
    The Stanley Holloway character (mostly) really grates but I suppose it was supposed to .
    Very subtle progression of rank for the main RAF roles,and again some gentle humour changing into the USAAF phase with B17's.

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