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  • Pinewood Studios

    Upstairs and Downstairs (1959) was filmed at Pinewood, and they didn't go quite as far as Wales to get to the Llandogo Garage:

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    The famous front entrance to Pinewood.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 5 January 2018, 02:16 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

    The famous front entrance to Pinewood.
    The lovely Natacha and I stopped off there when we went to see Scorsese making Hugo in 2010



    The actual entrance is now down the road through the new entrance

    Steve

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    • #3
      It’s not the Pinewood Studios double lodge entrance, but rather the garage that stood acroos the road until about ten years ago. Now replaced by housing called Bond Close.

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      • #4
        Interestingly the name Llandogo Garage was used for a building (well a set anyway) in League Of Gentlemen (1960), supposedly somewhere in London. Curious co-incidence or was the sign resurrected from the props department for this film?

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        • #5
          Interestingly the name Llandogo Garage was used for a building (well a set anyway) in League Of Gentlemen (1960), supposedly somewhere in London. Curious co-incidence or was the sign resurrected from the props department for this film?
          The film was made in part at Pinewood, and we know that they used a painting from another film in it, so reused props sounds like a decent guess. Filming is make believe, but props cost money!

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          • alan gowdy
            alan gowdy commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes L.O.G was indeed based at Pinewood and location work rarely strayed more than two or three miles from the gate. I imagine they were on a very tight budget. Still puzzled by their use of 'Llandogo' though - maybe was an in-joke.

        • #6
          Here's the sign at the entrance to the garage in Upstairs and Downstairs:

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          And the scene from The League of Gentlemen to which Alan refers:

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          As both films were made at Pinewood, I would agree it was simply the economical use of an existing sign. I suspect Upstairs and Downstairs was made first as there is a plot reason for that part of the film being set in Wales. On the DVD commentary for Gentlemen, Bryan Forbes makes no reference to an in-joke . . . and in fact he couldn't remember the scene at all!

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          • #7
            Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
            Here's the sign at the entrance to the garage in Upstairs and Downstairs:

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            And the scene from The League of Gentlemen to which Alan refers:

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            As both films were made at Pinewood, I would agree it was simply the economical use of an existing sign. I suspect Upstairs and Downstairs was made first as there is a plot reason for that part of the film being set in Wales. On the DVD commentary for Gentlemen, Bryan Forbes makes no reference to an in-joke . . . and in fact he couldn't remember the scene at all!
            A case of 'here's one I made earlier' !!

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            • #8
              Also at Pinewood and often seen in films made there:

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              Heatherden Hall, here standing in as the Flood Zone Headquarters in Floods of Fear (1958). That's John Crawford moaning because he's been splashed by a truck (!!).

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              • Cooper S
                Cooper S commented
                Editing a comment
                Probably the earliest use of this part of Pinewood was in Hitchcock's Young and Innocent, where it features as the entrance to the house where the children's party is being held.

            • #9
              "A country house, a few miles north of London":

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              Is surely Heatherden Hall. But's it's a cheeky image used in the (OVERSEAS PRESS CLUB) EXCLUSIVE! episode "The Man Who Changed Faces" because that was made at ABPC in Elstree and not at Pinewood.

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              • #10
                Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                Here's the sign at the entrance to the garage in Upstairs and Downstairs:

                As both films were made at Pinewood, I would agree it was simply the economical use of an existing sign. I suspect Upstairs and Downstairs was made first
                Upstairs and Downstairs - March 1959
                The League of Gentlemen - November 1959

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                • #11

                  #8.1
                  Cooper S commented
                  18th January 2020, 09:59 PM
                  Probably the earliest use of this part of Pinewood was in Hitchcock's Young and Innocent, where it features as the entrance to the house where the children's party is being held.

                  And here it is:

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                  • #12
                    It's lovely to see Pinewood in it's infancy.
                    When I drove past Pinewood a couple of years ago and stopped to take a look, I thought it was a very soulless place.
                    You could just about make out the Bond sound stages from the Stoke Poges road, through the general junk and detritus and the high fencing.
                    The main entrance is on a big roundabout from the Uxbridge Road.

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                    • #13
                      Another early use of Heatherden Hall can be seen in Crackerjack (1938) where it "plays" Larch Hall:

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                      • #14
                        Here is Heatherden Hall once more, inevitably used as a location for INTERPOL CALLING "Dead on Arrival" in 1959 given the series was filmed at Pinewood. The gardens are used too in the climax to the episode:

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                        I think certain interiors of Interpol Headquarters in Paris were filmed inside the hall as well.

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