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The East End in colour

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  • The East End in colour

    A nice article from the Guardian to co-incide with an exhibition and a book. There are some shots of locations used in Sparrows Can’t Sing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/artandde...-david-granick

    Nick

  • #2
    Looking at the last photo on that page:
    A Double Diamond Works Wonders
    but it can’t rebuild the buildings on either side

    Steve

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    • #3
      Yes, its a very interesting article, and its facinating to look at the same spots now. Actually, I just looked to see if the Old Red Lion was still next to Aldgate East Station, and Streetview shows the whole area totally changed, and certainly no pub. Its not even on the excellent Closed Pubs website, and had evidently long gone by the time the wonderful Derelict London website had a chance to record it.

      The photo of the homeless on the street brings to mind sequences in The London Nobody Knows, and reminds us that sadly, some things do not change. On the other hand, the Jewish cloth workers on the Whitechapel Road shows both continuity and change. The building on the corner housing the South Thames gas showroom still exists its much the same form, as are the buildings to the right of it. But instead of a gas showroom, its now a bank catering to the large Muslim community in the area - the London Muslim Centre is just down the road. The Jews came to the East End in the 19th century, and Muslims in the 20th - for much the same reasons.

      Comment


      • #4
        The old joke is that at Aldgate East they used to shout "Aldgate East, All get out"

        I'm not sure why though, I don't think that it was ever a teminus. It's on the District and the Hammersmith & City lines

        Steve

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
          The Jews came to the East End in the 19th century, and Muslims in the 20th - for much the same reasons.
          And the French Protestant Huguenots in the 17th century, the East End of London has often been a stopping off point for migrants escaping persecution, who then do well and spread out into the rest of the country

          Steve

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          • #6
            Exactly, which is perhaps the origin of the street name in that photo, Greatorex St.

            If your interested in old London, then I'd highly recommend the Museum of London's book, Dicken's Victorian London, which has 19th photos of places Dickens mentions or would have known. The change in much of London was radical in the 19th century, and the destruction of the old coaching inns breaks your heart. The book Shakespeare's Local describes them and Dickens mythology very well.

            Comment


            • #7
              I did some record sleeve recreations for a music site...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by zabadak View Post
                I did some record sleeve recreations for a music site...
                Great work, Zabadak!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ta........

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