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  • Bernard Herrmann

    He wrote several music scores for Alfred Hitchcock films. As I recall, Herrmann and Hitchcock had a falling out. What was the dispute over.

  • #2
    Universal wanted a more "commercial" score for Torn Curtain than Herrmann supplied, so bowing to pressure, Hitchcock replaced him with John Addison. I believe there had also been some disagreements between Hitch and Herrmann about which scenes should be scored.

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    • #3
      A genius ...

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      • #4
        Bernard also did the soundtrack for Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” released in 1976, just after Bernard’s death in 1975.

        Steve

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        • #5
          Hitch wanted a commercial song added e.g. Que serra serra but Hermann refused and this led to the break

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          • #6
            Who owns the rights to Hitchcock’s films. I began viewing his films around the early 1950’s. Strangers on a Train, Dial M Murder, The wrong man, were released by Warner Brothers. Around 1955, To catch a thief, and future films up to 1958 Vertigo was released by Paramount Pictures. Future films after Vertigo were being released by Universal International pictures. Now a days, all DVD’s of his films, except the Warner brothers releases, are being released by Universal. I assume the heirs to the Hitchcock estate, has control over these films. It’s strange watching Vertigo, the Universal logo then a Paramount pictures logo.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
              ...... It’s strange watching Vertigo, the Universal logo then a Paramount pictures logo.
              For years I always thought Hitchcock's Psycho was a Universal film, especially seeing as the house used is in Universal's backlot, until I watched the excellent blu-ray recently and it had the Paramount logo at the beginning - although it said 'A Paramount Release' rather than the usual 'A Paramount Picture'.

              All the sequels have the Universal logo, I'm pretty sure.

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              • #8
                Some years later a new version of Phycho was released. The interesting thing about this release it was the actually script used, same music score, only difference, in the original, 40,000.00 was taken by Marion Crane. In the new Version, 400,000.00 was taken. Anne Heche played the part of Marion Crane. OK remake, it, it did not have the Hitchcock direction.

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                • #9
                  In fact it is rare that the original production company of films in the period up to the fifties are still owned by their production companies.
                  in the UK Studio Canal own the majority of GB,ABC,,British Lion and Rank.
                  In the states MGM owned UA films,Universal owned Paramount,Warners 20th Fox .Turner have Warners pre 1950,MGM and RKO.Columbia's are owned by Sony.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                    For years I always thought Hitchcock's Psycho was a Universal film, especially seeing as the house used is in Universal's backlot, until I watched the excellent blu-ray recently and it had the Paramount logo at the beginning - although it said 'A Paramount Release' rather than the usual 'A Paramount Picture'.

                    All the sequels have the Universal logo, I'm pretty sure.
                    The film was made by Hitchcock's own production company, Shamley Productions, and released through Paramount, though Shamely retained the rights. The company, I believe, was later acquired by Universal. Hitchcock got shares in Universal in return.
                    Last edited by Paxton Milk; 21st August 2019, 05:53 AM.

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                    • Carl V
                      Carl V commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Wasn't Lew Wasserman associated with MCA earlier in his life, I seem to vaguely remember this from somewhere? I guess as he bought Universal, that might explain the earlier Universal logo where it said underneath "An MCA Company".

                    • Bonekicker
                      Bonekicker commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Wasserman started out as an agent with, and ended up running MCA, which was a powerhouse for talent. He figured out the tax friendly deal that meant James Stewart made a fortune out of Winchester 73, and pioneered the art of the film package. In 1962 MCA bought Universal (they had owned the lot for four years already) and Decca Records and merged them together. So yes, Universal for decades a 'MCA Company'.

                      In Steven Bach's 'Final Cut', Wasserman is mentioned with real admiration, compared favourably with the legendary Arthur Krim. Wasserman was tough, and was known for his behind the scenes influence (Valenti became head of the MPAA for 30 years thanks to him), and although a big Democrat donor, was also close to Reagan for decades.

                    • Carl V
                      Carl V commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thank you Bonekicker, that's great. When Paxton mentioned Wasserman, I seemed to recall some connection about him and MCA from an article I read some time ago. Glad to know my memory wasn't playing tricks thanks to your reply.

                  • #11
                    Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                    In fact it is rare that the original production company of films in the period up to the fifties are still owned by their production companies.
                    in the UK Studio Canal own the majority of GB,ABC,,British Lion and Rank.
                    In the states MGM owned UA films,Universal owned Paramount,Warners 20th Fox .Turner have Warners pre 1950,MGM and RKO.Columbia's are owned by Sony.
                    Which - if I understand your point correctly - makes Columbia the exception, as Sony bought the entire company (as opposed to just the rights to the back catalogue) in 1987, renamed it Sony in 1991, and have continued operating it as a film-making enterprise.

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Ian Fryer View Post

                      Which - if I understand your point correctly - makes Columbia the exception, as Sony bought the entire company (as opposed to just the rights to the back catalogue) in 1987, renamed it Sony in 1991, and have continued operating it as a film-making enterprise.
                      And just to complicate things even more, Sony, often trading as Columbia, operate their film-making enterprise out of what remains of the old MGM studios in Culver City!

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                      • #13
                        To take this a step further.T CM may own the actual RKO films they don't own the literary rights,these are owned by RKO Pictures.So if you wanted to remake Citizen Kane you would have to go not to TCM but to RKO to negotiate a rights deal.

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                        • #14


                          Which - if I understand your point correctly - makes Columbia the exception, as Sony bought the entire company (as opposed to just the rights to the back catalogue) in 1987, renamed it Sony in 1991, and have continued operating it as a film-making enterprise.
                          Many of the original studios from the 30's still exist, but the panic selling of supposedly unvaluable back catalogues in the 40's and 50's have distorted slightly who produced what. Add to that the time when multi nationals and asset strippers got to Hollywood, and its a bit of a mess. Content is king, and buying the rights to stuff is a way of making money for a very long time.

                          Columbia wasnt as big as the major five, and like UA, didnt own any theatres, so didnt suffer the shock of having to get rid of them in 1948. And they owned Screen Gems, which successfully produced TV programmes until it essentially owned the rest of Columbia. Basically, the studio survived with its back catalogue intact because the operation was cheap enough to survive without panic selling and then TV was its lifeline. Sony Pictures is the official title but I notice that the Columbia name and woman is still used.

                          UA also had its back catalogue intact until Transamerica sold it to MGM after the debacle of Heavens Gate (they possibly were going to sell it anyway, but that kind of pushed them).

                          Whats interesting is that not only have the names not actually hugely changed, but after years of the studios being owned by the likes of Coke, Transamerica, gambling corporations (MGM), asset strippers, an internet company (remember when AOL was worth far more than the rest of Time Warner?), a drinks company, and a water company,plus a load of holding companies, by and large, they have returned to the roots - they are owned by media companies, who make and distribute media. In the 20's, they would have been owned by parent groups who owned cinema chains, radio groups or industrial/electronic manufacturers.

                          So the cinema chains and radio have been replaced by the likes of Viacom (which owns Paramount and itself is owned by National Amusements, which owns cinemas like the Showcase chain, and will merge this year with CBS (which started as the radio Columbia Broadcasting System...), Comcast (which owns NBC Universal, which is TV , cable, etc), AT & T (huge telecommunications company, which is basically the old Bell telephone company put back together, who owns Warners, and strangely enough once owned the original NBC back in the early twenties), and Sony, who own Columbia. Which isnt so different from Sarnoff's RCA forming RKO in 1928.

                          The company that isnt owned by a parent media/tech group, and still makes most of its money in film and TV? Disney. Same as it ever was. But now they own Fox, the rights to Star Wars and Marvel.

                          Who owns the rights to stuff is stunningly complex, but its probably one of the above - they have hoovered up everything.

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                          • #15
                            Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                            To take this a step further.T CM may own the actual RKO films they don't own the literary rights,these are owned by RKO Pictures.....
                            I could be completely wrong here, but did the BBC once have the screen rights to the RKO catalogue? I'm going back a very long time, so I may be confusing this with something else. I do recall the BBC showing lots of RKO's films back in the 80's and 90's, but these days not that many seem to get shown.

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                            • Carl V
                              Carl V commented
                              Editing a comment
                              The BBC also showed a documentary about RKO back in the 80's at the same time they were showing a season of their films, which included most of the Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers films, as well as some lesser known films from the RKO catalogue. Funnily enough, I can't recall many RKO films in colour. The only one that springs to mind is 'Underwater' with Jane Russell - probably one of the many films the BBC screened in the 80's.

                            • Bonekicker
                              Bonekicker commented
                              Editing a comment
                              It turns out that RKO released Becky Sharp, the first 3 colour Technicolor feature film in 1935, but yeah, not that many colour films. I suppose B & W was still fairly standard in the era the studio effectively died, and looking at its track record from when Hughes bought the company, big budget colour productions were not on the agenda. Even Howard Hawks 1952 The Big Sky was in B & W.

                              The death of RKO looks like a really sad story - ups and downs until 1948 (including some real classics - the sublime Mr Blandings Builds his Dream House just got under the wire before the nightmare began), when Hughes took over, and then mismanagement and decay. And I remember that documentary series as well. Its not available on Iplayer https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00...episodes/guide , but its on Youtube! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY-HsTvu92A

                            • Carl V
                              Carl V commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Well spotted Bonekicker, and thanks for the link to the RKO documentaries. I'll enjoy watching those again.
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