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  • #16
    Originally posted by Carl V View Post

    I could be completely wrong here, but did the BBC once have the screen rights to the RKO catalogue? I'm going back a very long time, so I may be confusing this with something else. I do recall the BBC showing lots of RKO's films back in the 80's and 90's, but these days not that many seem to get shown.
    The BBC were showing old RKO films on Saturday mornings on BBC2 until comparatively recently (bearing in mind that to me comparatively recently is twenty five years ago).

    Getting back to Bernard Herrmann, I remember listening to Brian Matthew introducing Saturday Club on the Light Programme and telling us that we would be hearing "Bernard Herrmann and the NDO" (the BBC's Northern Dance Orchestra). Even then, I knew that Bernard Herrmann was a famous movie composer and wondered what he was doing conducting the NDO. Of course, I subsequently discovered that the BBC's Bernard Herrmann was a completely different person!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Carl V View Post

      I could be completely wrong here, but did the BBC once have the screen rights to the RKO catalogue? I'm going back a very long time, so I may be confusing this with something else. I do recall the BBC showing lots of RKO's films back in the 80's and 90's, but these days not that many seem to get shown.
      I think there was an outcry from the film industry when the BBC acquired the RKO catalogue - was it in the 50s? - as the studios were still trying to convince themselves that television did not exist and encouraging the upstart small box to show feature films was simply not on!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

        I think there was an outcry from the film industry when the BBC acquired the RKO catalogue - was it in the 50s? - as the studios were still trying to convince themselves that television did not exist and encouraging the upstart small box to show feature films was simply not on!
        I'm glad you mentioned that as I was beginning to doubt myself. I suspect I probably read about this in the Radio Times sometime in the 1980's, and it may have been at the time when the BBC broadcast a documentary about RKO. Unfortunately I can't remember if the article mentioned any particular decade in which the BBC acquired the RKO films.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

          I think there was an outcry from the film industry when the BBC acquired the RKO catalogue - was it in the 50s? - as the studios were still trying to convince themselves that television did not exist and encouraging the upstart small box to show feature films was simply not on!
          In the UK the studios set up FIDO, the Film Industry Defence Organisation, specifically to buy the rights to any film that looked like it was heading for television. When Danny Angel threatened to sell his films to TV, Rank's John Davis used it as an excuse to dump Kenneth More, who had a contract with Angel.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

            In the UK the studios set up FIDO, the Film Industry Defence Organisation, specifically to buy the rights to any film that looked like it was heading for television. When Danny Angel threatened to sell his films to TV, Rank's John Davis used it as an excuse to dump Kenneth More, who had a contract with Angel.
            How many excuses are there for Kenneth More to be dumped? He was rude to Davis at an official gathering, his box-office appeal was wanning, he was actively canvassing a release from his contract...

            For an actor who appears to have hated being at Rank, he (or his fans) seem quick to pin the blame for his termination on Davis. Shouldn't this be a cause for celebration?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

              How many excuses are there for Kenneth More to be dumped? He was rude to Davis at an official gathering, his box-office appeal was wanning, he was actively canvassing a release from his contract...

              For an actor who appears to have hated being at Rank, he (or his fans) seem quick to pin the blame for his termination on Davis. Shouldn't this be a cause for celebration?
              As has been mentioned on here before, Rank were getting rid of most of their contract stars at the time. The beef with Davis isn't for dropping More, but for first withdrawing permission to loan him out for The Guns of Navarone, and (it is implied) blackballing him from the film industry for most of the rest of the decade. I couldn't say if the latter were true, but it is widely thought so.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                How many excuses are there for Kenneth More to be dumped? He was rude to Davis at an official gathering, his box-office appeal was wanning, he was actively canvassing a release from his contract...

                For an actor who appears to have hated being at Rank, he (or his fans) seem quick to pin the blame for his termination on Davis. Shouldn't this be a cause for celebration?
                Kenneth More explained all of this in his autobiography. More apologised to Davis for his outburst at the dinner, but Davis claimed that Angel's actions were the reason that he was not being released for Guns of Naverone. They later came to a settlement releasing More from his contract, but More found work hard to come by in the film industry, not helped by many of his "friends" shunning him after he left his wife and child to live with Angela Douglas.

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                • #23
                  BBC bought the RKO library in the late fifties.They were used as test films prior to the opening of BBC2 in1964.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Ian Fryer View Post

                    As has been mentioned on here before, Rank were getting rid of most of their contract stars at the time. The beef with Davis isn't for dropping More, but for first withdrawing permission to loan him out for The Guns of Navarone, and (it is implied) blackballing him from the film industry for most of the rest of the decade. I couldn't say if the latter were true, but it is widely thought so.
                    In other words, nothing to do with selling film rights

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

                      Kenneth More explained all of this in his autobiography. More apologised to Davis for his outburst at the dinner, but Davis claimed that Angel's actions were the reason that he was not being released for Guns of Naverone. They later came to a settlement releasing More from his contract, but More found work hard to come by in the film industry, not helped by many of his "friends" shunning him after he left his wife and child to live with Angela Douglas.
                      So Angel was only tangentially responsible, not the excuse Davis use. Assuming, of course, you believe More’s version of events

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                        So Angel was only tangentially responsible, not the excuse Davis use. Assuming, of course, you believe More’s version of events
                        On the subject of More and Angel, I gather Daniel Angel successfully sued More for libel over something in his autobiography. Does anyone know what the offending passage was? With both parties dead, I think we're safe to discuss the subject.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ian Fryer View Post

                          On the subject of More and Angel, I gather Daniel Angel successfully sued More for libel over something in his autobiography. Does anyone know what the offending passage was? With both parties dead, I think we're safe to discuss the subject.
                          I can’t tell you what it was but if it was a successful libel action, we are free to discuss it. If it was an out of court settlement, that’s quite different

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
                            Who owns the rights to Hitchcock’s films. I began viewing his films around the early 1950’s. Strangers on a Train, Dial M Murder, The wrong man, were released by Warner Brothers. Around 1955, To catch a thief, and future films up to 1958 Vertigo was released by Paramount Pictures. Future films after Vertigo were being released by Universal International pictures. Now a days, all DVD’s of his films, except the Warner brothers releases, are being released by Universal. I assume the heirs to the Hitchcock estate, has control over these films. It’s strange watching Vertigo, the Universal logo then a Paramount pictures logo.
                            It's only Hitchcock's Paramount films; Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo, where ownership changed to Universal. At some stage Hitchcock obtained rights to all the Paramount films and, apart from Psycho and To Catch a Thief, withheld rental rights, so they were unseen for very many years. Hitchcock subsequently sold the rights to Universal who gave the films major theatrical reissues in 1983 - I went to see them at the Plaza, London. Universal originally cut out the Paramount logos but fortunately they later re-inserted them, following the Universal logo.

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                            • #29
                              The first time I saw Psycho, it only had the Universal logo on it. To further confuse the issue, the Psycho house was/is on the Universal backlot where the film was shot, not at Paramount.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by vanmunchen View Post

                                It's only Hitchcock's Paramount films; Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo, where ownership changed to Universal. At some stage Hitchcock obtained rights to all the Paramount films and, apart from Psycho and To Catch a Thief, withheld rental rights, so they were unseen for very many years. Hitchcock subsequently sold the rights to Universal who gave the films major theatrical reissues in 1983 - I went to see them at the Plaza, London. Universal originally cut out the Paramount logos but fortunately they later re-inserted them, following the Universal logo.
                                During the 1950's Hitch made films for Warner Bros., Paramount and MGM as well as his own production companies:-

                                1950 Stage Fright - Warner Bros. Still with Warner.
                                1951 Strangers on a Train - Warner Bros. Still with Warner.
                                1953 I Confess - Warner Bros. Still with Warner.
                                1954 Dial M For Murder - Warner Bros. Still with Warner
                                1954 Rear Window - Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions/Paramount release. Now with Universal.
                                1955 To Catch a Thief - Paramount. Still with Paramount
                                1955 The Trouble With Harry - Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions/Paramount release. Now with Universal.
                                1956 The Man Who Knew Too Much - Filwhite Productions/Paramount release. Now with Universal.
                                1956 The Wrong Man - Warner Bros. Still with Warner.
                                1958 Vertigo - Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions/ Paramount release. Now with Universal.
                                1959 North By Northwest- MGM. Now with Warner via Turner.
                                1960 Psycho - Shamley Productions/Paramount release. Now with Universal

                                All of his films of the rest of the sixties and seventies were made by Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions for Universal, who still hold the rights.
                                Last edited by Odeonman; 1st September 2019, 05:02 PM.

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