Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hammer Complete by Howard Maxford

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

    The days when I bought everything I could find on British cinema are long gone- as are most of those little bookshops, I suspect.
    Quite a few of the independent bookshops are closing Paxton, I'm sorry to say. Up until a few years ago, there was one in the next village down from where I live which I used to go into regularly, and I got to know the guy who owned it quite well. He'd been there since the early 80's, and he could order any book you could ask for and have it within a day or two. I have emptied my wallet here on many occasions.

    Waterstones then opened up a store further down the street from his shop. Not long after it opened, one day when I popped into his shop he let me know that he'd be closing down within a couple of weeks. I asked him if Waterstones had affected his business and he actually said it wasn't because of them, but instead the landlord sharply increased the cost of the rent from the previous year and he could no longer afford to keep his shop open. I felt really sorry for him, as despite Waterstones, I always bought my books from him and I believe many of his other regular customers continued to do the same.

    Waterstones is a good shop and well stocked, but somehow it just doesn't have that level of service that a good independent shop can offer.
    Last edited by Carl V; 8th October 2019, 10:22 AM.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Carl V View Post

      Quite a few of the independent bookshops are closing Paxton, I'm sorry to say. Up until a few years ago, there was one in the next village down from where I live which I used to go into regularly, and I got to know the guy who owned it quite well. He'd been there since the early 80's, and he could order any book you could ask for and have it within a day or two. I have emptied my wallet here on many occasions.

      Waterstones then opened up a store further down the street from his shop. Not long after it opened, one day when I popped into his shop he let me know that he'd be closing down within a couple of weeks. I asked him if Waterstones had affected his business and he actually said it wasn't because of them, but instead the landlord sharply increased the cost of the rent from the previous year and he could no longer afford to keep his shop open. I felt really sorry for him, as despite Waterstones, I always bought my books from him and I believe many of his other regular customers continued to do the same.

      Waterstones is a good shop and well stocked, but somehow it just doesn't have that level of service that a good independent shop can offer.
      It is sad. The Larry Edmunds shop in LA is renowned for its stock, and it has a vast array of books, but it’s about as impersonal as it’s possible to get. I am not quite sure what sort of movies these guys are into but in 20 years I have been unable to engage them in any sort of meaningful conversation about them. Dark Delicacies, in Burbank, on the other only go for fantasy fiction and non-fiction, much, much smaller, and you can spend all day chatting.

      Print media, sadly, is on its way out.

      Incidentally, I looked up that Hammer book by Fellner, he was a member of the Chris Lee fan club on the 1960s. I have seen some of the newsletters from them and Lee is exceptionally frank about his movies and his relationship with Hammer, specifically the salary negotiations which seem to have vexed him A LOT. If Fellner manages to channel some of that, it will be an interesting read. Most of the later Hammer books seem to a rosy colored view of things, and Lee’s later comments all have the tone of someone keeping one eye on his screen legacy about them.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

        It is sad. The Larry Edmunds shop in LA is renowned for its stock, and it has a vast array of books, but it’s about as impersonal as it’s possible to get. I am not quite sure what sort of movies these guys are into but in 20 years I have been unable to engage them in any sort of meaningful conversation about them. Dark Delicacies, in Burbank, on the other only go for fantasy fiction and non-fiction, much, much smaller, and you can spend all day chatting.
        Just for interest, I had a quick look at the websites for Larry Edmunds and Dark Delicacies - the latter shop looks interesting. I'm guessing when you say it's hard to have a conversation with the staff at Larry Edmunds, it's probably down to them not having any interest or knowledge in the books they're selling. I've come across shops like that - it's almost like they're just going through the motions.

        Regarding the Fellner book, well if it revealed some more information about Lee's relationship with Hammer, I would indeed be interested. I've seen some of Lee's interviews on various DVD's over the years, and he seems quite content to talk about his films, but I don't recall him ever mentioning about his salary negotiations. This would indeed be fascinating to find out about.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post
          The Larry Edmunds shop in LA is renowned for its stock, and it has a vast array of books, but it’s about as impersonal as it’s possible to get. I am not quite sure what sort of movies these guys are into but in 20 years I have been unable to engage them in any sort of meaningful conversation about them.
          Sounds like things have changed, but on my first visit to LA in 1987, I found them very helpful and I managed to get a first edition of the (then rare) autobiography of Basil Rathbone and an original Rathbone autograph. Mind you, much of my holiday spending money was blown on that one visit, so no wonder they were helpful!

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

            Sounds like things have changed, but on my first visit to LA in 1987, I found them very helpful and I managed to get a first edition of the (then rare) autobiography of Basil Rathbone and an original Rathbone autograph. Mind you, much of my holiday spending money was blown on that one visit, so no wonder they were helpful!
            Definitely changed, Gerald. I was last there in August 2018 and it was they could do to run up the till, never mind engage in conversation, and that’s pretty much my experience on previous visits too. Great stock of books, be prepared to search through it on your own!

            how was Rathbone’s autobiography, btw? Great actor, but I know little about his life outside of the movies.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Carl V View Post
              Regarding the Fellner book, well if it revealed some more information about Lee's relationship with Hammer, I would indeed be interested. I've seen some of Lee's interviews on various DVD's over the years, and he seems quite content to talk about his films, but I don't recall him ever mentioning about his salary negotiations. This would indeed be fascinating to find out about.
              if you have an interest in either Lee or Hammer, or just 1960s films, I would definitely try to get hold of the newsletters, they offer a very different perspective from the actor than his later interviews where he reluctantly agrees to make yet another Dracula movie just to keep the technicians in work. His notes at the time are all about bickering with Hammer about his salary- AIP also comes in for a bit of stick on that score- and while he expresses lots of concerns about the quality of the Dracula scripts, he manages to live with these for the right price. No indication of emotional blackmail from James Carreras.

              You might be able to get them on eBay

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                if you have an interest in either Lee or Hammer, or just 1960s films, I would definitely try to get hold of the newsletters, they offer a very different perspective from the actor than his later interviews where he reluctantly agrees to make yet another Dracula movie just to keep the technicians in work. His notes at the time are all about bickering with Hammer about his salary- AIP also comes in for a bit of stick on that score- and while he expresses lots of concerns about the quality of the Dracula scripts, he manages to live with these for the right price. No indication of emotional blackmail from James Carreras.

                You might be able to get them on eBay
                Many thanks for the information Paxton, I'll see what I can find.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                  Definitely changed, Gerald. I was last there in August 2018 and it was they could do to run up the till, never mind engage in conversation, and that’s pretty much my experience on previous visits too. Great stock of books, be prepared to search through it on your own!

                  how was Rathbone’s autobiography, btw? Great actor, but I know little about his life outside of the movies.
                  Rathbone might have been an excellent actor, but he wasn't a great writer. It's all rather bitty and quite a difficult read. He could be quite sniffy about several of the films we regard well, but he didn't!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

                    Rathbone might have been an excellent actor, but he wasn't a great writer. It's all rather bitty and quite a difficult read. He could be quite sniffy about several of the films we regard well, but he didn't!
                    That’s a bit of a disappointment, but thanks for sharing

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I read this book some years ago.Unfortunately he came to hate Holmes because it typecast him.He didn't like modern films of tv.He thought that Robin Hood was a good not a great fil!.He was clearly at the time of writing the book not a happyt man.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I wonder how he felt about playing comedy in The Court Jester.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                          I read this book some years ago.Unfortunately he came to hate Holmes because it typecast him.He didn't like modern films of tv.He thought that Robin Hood was a good not a great fil!.He was clearly at the time of writing the book not a happyt man.
                          just been reading the latest issue of Little Shoppe of Horrors, the US magazine which has The Blood Beast Terror as it’s cover story this month. Mr Rathbone was originally cast as the villain, but unfortunately, or maybe fortunately- depending on your perspective- died just before shooting began. Not sure when he wrote his autobiography, but I don’t think appearing in this low-budget tosh would have improved his demeanor!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by cassidy View Post
                            I wonder how he felt about playing comedy in The Court Jester.
                            I'm curious to know how he felt about appearing in an Esther Williams musical called Bathing Beauty, from 1944. I don't ever recall seeing this, but it's not the kind of film I'd expect to find Rathbone in.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                              I'm curious to know how he felt about appearing in an Esther Williams musical called Bathing Beauty, from 1944. I don't ever recall seeing this, but it's not the kind of film I'd expect to find Rathbone in.
                              At the time, Rathbone was under contract to MGM who loaned him out to do the Sherlock Holmes films at Universal, but called him back to appear in Bathing Beauty. According to his biographer Michael B. Druxman, Rathbone said at the time:
                              "I really don't mind Metro's selling my services for the Holmes pictures at a much larger fee than they're paying me. That's just good business. But what does gripe me is the fact that, when I do a film for them, it's always a piece of junk like Bathing Beauty."

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

                                At the time, Rathbone was under contract to MGM who loaned him out to do the Sherlock Holmes films at Universal, but called him back to appear in Bathing Beauty. According to his biographer Michael B. Druxman, Rathbone said at the time:
                                "I really don't mind Metro's selling my services for the Holmes pictures at a much larger fee than they're paying me. That's just good business. But what does gripe me is the fact that, when I do a film for them, it's always a piece of junk like Bathing Beauty."
                                Excellent, thanks for that Gerald. His villainous roles such as the ones he played in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and The Mark of Zorro (1940) were more typical of him I guess. However with Bathing Beauty being a musical, I find it hard to imagine Rathbone performing a musical number alongside Esther Williams.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X